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    Berkeley Electronic's eLegs

    Has anyone ever seen these? WOW, I would love to figure out how much they cost and if they are in the marketplace yet.

    Would you use them? I have never seen anything like them.

    http://www.crunchgear.com/2010/10/07...her-legs-back/

    #2
    Here is another link.
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/...alk-again.html

    They will be going for about $100K, according to that site I hope that price will go down drastically so we can all get one

    Comment


      #3
      if it's as good as these reports lead one to believe, I'll find a way to drum up $100k.

      looks badass.

      Comment


        #4
        What a great step in the right direction. Pun intended. I'm in when they can run, for sure. Just hobbling around with a walker? Not quite worth $100k for that, but I sure hope lots of other people think it is, so products like this continue to develop.
        "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

        "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

        Comment


          #5
          I've just gotten [mentally] tired of wheeling around after almost 12yrs. I almost feel like this is a "price is only an issue in the absence of value" kind of thing, even if only used part time. But yeah, $100k is an awful lot for a 1st gen product.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by DaleB View Post
            What a great step in the right direction. Pun intended. I'm in when they can run, for sure. Just hobbling around with a walker? Not quite worth $100k for that, but I sure hope lots of other people think it is, so products like this continue to develop.
            i am in wish i could get hooked up in a study like that

            Comment


              #7
              I saw a live demonstration of the made in Israel ReWalk exoskeleton and while impressive, I think that most of the people in attendance left feeling that the technology is a far way off from practical. The eLegs doesn't seem to offer any functional difference. With respect to the ReWalk, aside from the para who demonstrates it in the video, none of the research subjects trialing it have used it outside of an institutional setting. Walking on uneven surfaces was still a hurdle to be solved. The list of "What ifs?" and "What happens when?" was a long one.

              I would love to try one out as well, but until the cost comes WAY down, I wouldn't expect to see one (let alone own one) in the real world for a very long time.

              BTW, the ReWalk has not yet been adapted for injuries above ~T4.
              stephen@bike-on.com

              Comment


                #8
                I happen to be one of those (annoying) paras who can (barely) walk. If I have a walker, and some smooth ground, I can motor along at about half normal speed for decent distances. After about 400 yards my legs are shaking and I have to give them a break. If the ground is not smooth (like a carpet), then speed drops fast.

                What is my point?

                Well, basically, I can walk slightly better than any of the demonstrations in the video, and yet I would not classify my ability as a means of transport. It's slightly better than a party trick. Although standing up at home helps around the kitchen etc.

                So, while this is a tantalizing video and may offer a glimpse of things to come....I wouldn't recommend anyone shelling out $100k. The novelty of standing and hobbling around wears off pretty fast.



                Having said that, I was really touched by the reaction of that lady.....it took me back to my first steps.....

                Comment


                  #9
                  This is what I want.....would be great with my walker.....full steam ahead

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EdK2y...layer_embedded#!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Stand and walk- introducing eLegs

                    http://berkeleybionics.com/

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Lightweight Exoskeleton Gives Paraplegics New Legs

                      SAN FRANCISCO — A Berkeley company on Thursday introduced a battery-powered exoskeleton to get paraplegics out of their wheelchairs and walking on their feet.
                      Called eLEGS, the exoskeleton consists of a robotic frame controlled through crutches. The crutches contain sensors; putting forward the right crutch moves the left leg, and vise versa. The eLEGS battery can enable a user to walk for one day before it needs to be recharged, according to the product’s developer Berkeley Bionics. (See video below.)
                      “With every step I feel more confident, and it’s truly liberating,” said Amanda Boxtel, a paraplegic for 18 years who demonstrated the eLEGS exoskeleton at a press conference Thursday. “I’m usually in a wheelchair and 4 feet tall, staring up at people’s nostrils. Now I’m able to look at the world.”
                      Exoskeletons — wearable, artificially intelligent bionic devices — have primarily been developed for military usage to enhance soldiers’ strength and endurance in the battlefield. In the medical industry, doctors are also studying exoskeleton applications to assist the physically disabled.
                      The implications of exoskeletons in the health field go beyond giving paraplegics robotic legs. They could also teach people to learn how to walk on their own again. Currently, rehabilitation centers use much larger, stationary and extremely expensive devices to assist with temporary walking. (Wired.com’s Tim Carmody points out that “Getting time on these devices is like getting telescope time for an astronomer.”)


                      Being able to walk with an exoskeleton enables users to do rehabilitation anywhere and anytime — and that could be especially beneficial to people who are recently injured, Boxtel says in the video below, because they can begin load-bearing rehabilitation exercises while they still have the muscle memory for walking.
                      “There’s huge therapeutic benefits for this device that will then become a preventative measure in the long term because our bodies are meant to be walking upright and moving,” Boxtel said.
                      Berkeley Bionics based the eLEGS exoskeleton design on Lockheed Martin’s Human Universal Load Carrier (HULC) exoskeleton, a system designed to help military soldiers traverse through rough terrain without injuries.
                      Berkeley Bionics modified the HULC to make the eLEGS extremely user friendly with a Velcro strap, backpack-style clips and shoulder straps; anybody should be able to slip it on and off in a minute or two. The eLEGS will fit most people between 5′ 2″ and 6′ 4″, weighing 220 pounds or less, and Berkeley Bionics said it was especially important to make the exoskeleton thin, lightweight and very quiet when operated.
                      “Today I’m going to rekindle a hope among [those with] spinal cord injuries,” said Eythor Bender, CEO of Berkeley Bionics. “[eLEGS] will help people to get out of wheel chairs, stand up, walk, sit down and do other things as we develop it forward.”
                      The eLEGS will initially be available at select rehabilitation centers starting July 2011, according to Bender.
                      The company also plans a mobile version of eLEGS for home use. People will be able to strap it on in the morning and use to walk around as they go about their days, according to CEO Eythor Bender.

                      Read More http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/...#ixzz11mCA8xkw

                      <LI class=entryAuthor _extended="true">By Brian X. Chen <LI class=entryDate _extended="true">October 7, 2010 | <LI class=entryTime _extended="true">5:12 pm | <LI class=entryCategories _extended="true">Categories: R&D and Inventions
                      T5/6, ASIA A, injured 30 Nov 08
                      Future SCI Alumnus.
                      I don't want to dance in the rain, I want to soar above the storm.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        eLEGS - Lightweight Exoskeleton

                        SAN FRANCISCO — A Berkeley company on Thursday introduced a battery-powered exoskeleton to get paraplegics out of their wheelchairs and walking on their feet.
                        Called eLEGS, the exoskeleton consists of a robotic frame controlled through crutches. The crutches contain sensors; putting forward the right crutch moves the left leg, and vise versa. The eLEGS battery can enable a user to walk for one day before it needs to be recharged, according to the product’s developer Berkeley Bionics. (See video below.)
                        “With every step I feel more confident, and it’s truly liberating,” said Amanda Boxtel, a paraplegic for 18 years who demonstrated the eLEGS exoskeleton at a press conference Thursday. “I’m usually in a wheelchair and 4 feet tall, staring up at people’s nostrils. Now I’m able to look at the world.”
                        Exoskeletons — wearable, artificially intelligent bionic devices — have primarily been developed for military usage to enhance soldiers’ strength and endurance in the battlefield. In the medical industry, doctors are also studying exoskeleton applications to assist the physically disabled.
                        The implications of exoskeletons in the health field go beyond giving paraplegics robotic legs. They could also teach people to learn how to walk on their own again. Currently, rehabilitation centers use much larger, stationary and extremely expensive devices to assist with temporary walking. (Wired.com’s Tim Carmody points out that “Getting time on these devices is like getting telescope time for an astronomer.”)


                        Being able to walk with an exoskeleton enables users to do rehabilitation anywhere and anytime — and that could be especially beneficial to people who are recently injured, Boxtel says in the video below, because they can begin load-bearing rehabilitation exercises while they still have the muscle memory for walking.
                        “There’s huge therapeutic benefits for this device that will then become a preventative measure in the long term because our bodies are meant to be walking upright and moving,” Boxtel said.
                        Berkeley Bionics based the eLEGS exoskeleton design on Lockheed Martin’s Human Universal Load Carrier (HULC) exoskeleton, a system designed to help military soldiers traverse through rough terrain without injuries.
                        Berkeley Bionics modified the HULC to make the eLEGS extremely user friendly with a Velcro strap, backpack-style clips and shoulder straps; anybody should be able to slip it on and off in a minute or two. The eLEGS will fit most people between 5′ 2″ and 6′ 4″, weighing 220 pounds or less, and Berkeley Bionics said it was especially important to make the exoskeleton thin, lightweight and very quiet when operated.
                        “Today I’m going to rekindle a hope among [those with] spinal cord injuries,” said Eythor Bender, CEO of Berkeley Bionics. “[eLEGS] will help people to get out of wheel chairs, stand up, walk, sit down and do other things as we develop it forward.”
                        The eLEGS will initially be available at select rehabilitation centers starting July 2011, according to Bender.
                        The company also plans a mobile version of eLEGS for home use. People will be able to strap it on in the morning and use to walk around as they go about their days, according to CEO Eythor Bender.
                        See below for a video from Berkeley Bionics explaining eLEGS.


                        Read More http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/...#ixzz11mCM7DJh
                        T5/6, ASIA A, injured 30 Nov 08
                        Future SCI Alumnus.
                        I don't want to dance in the rain, I want to soar above the storm.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          While I would love to walk again...I am wondering how heavy this is and how reliable it is. I also want to make sure I am independent...if I need to walk with crutches...then I am not going to be able to carry things, etc...just like I am with my RGOs.

                          Would love to see more come out of this...along with the price tag coming significantly down.
                          "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

                          Comment


                            #14
                            eLegs in action

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Hey, remember when we could walk on our own and sometimes after walking for a bit we'd have the sudden urge to drop a deuce? Yeah, I can see that happening.

                              Comment

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