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colours portable hand controls (pics) -- updated w/ photo of MPDs installed

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    colours portable hand controls (pics) -- updated w/ photo of MPDs installed

    I have a new-to-me car that I've been using my portable hand controls in before getting my MPDs transplanted in... figured I'd snap a couple pics if any of you are interested in seeing them.

    My injury level is C6/7. These are the only mods to the car. These controls are meant to be operated by using your thumb to push the gas... I don't have the motor fxn to do so, so I just use my palm, removing my hand from the brake. It works well, although it's not as responsive of a setup as a permanent set. Works fine for the short term though.
    Last edited by -scott-; 8 Sep 2008, 11:48 AM.

    #2
    how it mounts: screws that hold two plates on either side of each pedal. crank 'em tight & nothing moves.

    the length adjusts w/ the pins you see in each rod. pretty simple.

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      #3
      I use the same kind but mine are tnt's. Does your thumb ever fatigue from holding the gas in place? I have gotten used to it. I don't have cruise control on my chevelle

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        #4
        I can't move my thumbs; I use my palm. Yes, my forearm can get a little fatigued, but it hasn't been anything major, even for 100-150mi trips, which is the farthest [trip] I've driven w/ this setup as of yet.

        I'm used to moving my hands around more. I have a set of SureGrips (in another vehicle) & a set of MPDs, both of which allow for holding the wheel steady (if not making any big turns) w/ the left hand.

        This setup rests on my lap. It's not as ideal.

        Cruise control helps big time though.
        Last edited by -scott-; 1 Sep 2008, 4:39 PM.

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          #5
          Is it possible to press the gas and brake at the same time in an emergency braking situation?

          Dave
          Dave

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            #6
            Originally posted by Herco16
            Is it possible to press the gas and brake at the same time in an emergency braking situation?

            Dave
            yup, easier than permanent sets actually. the rod connected to the gas pedal operates independently of the brake. it just slips through a hole on the brake handle to keep the two together.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Scott Pruett
              yup, easier than permanent sets actually. the rod connected to the gas pedal operates independently of the brake. it just slips through a hole on the brake handle to keep the two together.
              YIKES!! LOL

              I have a set of PHC III temps that I like, but I wish there was a bend in them so they didn't ride so low.

              Dave
              Dave

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                #8
                Originally posted by Scott Pruett
                It works well, although it's not as responsive of a setup as a permanent set. Works fine for the short term though.
                This type of control strikes me as unsafe even for the "short term". How far or how long does one have to drive before one should worry about having an accident? Is it OK to not wear a seatbelt or a helmet if one is just running to the grocery store? I don't think so. I certainly wouldn't think it was safe if one were taking a 100+ mile trip. Please be careful out there.

                C.

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                  #9
                  These are what I use when I rent cars. I have driven 800 mile (each way) trips without any issues. I also have a set of these in our shop car, for 2.5 years and have never had a problem with them either.

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                    #10
                    If you don't mind me asking, how much are these? We're thinking about a second vehicle here, and I would like a small SUV like a Ford Escape, Saturn Vue or Honda CRV .. a second set of hand controls would be perfect for an occassional driver like me (leaning towards the Vue).
                    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Tiger Racing
                      This type of control strikes me as unsafe even for the "short term". How far or how long does one have to drive before one should worry about having an accident? Is it OK to not wear a seatbelt or a helmet if one is just running to the grocery store? I don't think so. I certainly wouldn't think it was safe if one were taking a 100+ mile trip. Please be careful out there.

                      C.
                      I wouldn't compare this to not wearing a seatbelt or helmet. I don't advocate using these as an everyday set, but they're not hazardous to use. They do require a little extra attention, but that's all, IMO.

                      They're more annoying than unsafe, as they have to be moved aside for transferring. Additionally, getting my legs positioned around them take a little extra effort.

                      I appreciate your concern for safety though. I lost a friend to an OHV accident that could've been prevented. To further the discussion, what about these appears unsafe to you?

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by lynnifer
                        If you don't mind me asking, how much are these? We're thinking about a second vehicle here, and I would like a small SUV like a Ford Escape, Saturn Vue or Honda CRV .. a second set of hand controls would be perfect for an occassional driver like me (leaning towards the Vue).
                        I don't recall what I paid... think it was just under $300. Too much, whatever it was. At least they're well-constructed.

                        Sportaid has them for $310: http://www.sportaid.com/product.php?...sa&prdID=45556

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Scott Pruett
                          To further the discussion, what about these appears unsafe to you?
                          In case of an emergency, these controls don't look as secure and steady to use as permanent hand controls. We already suffer in the upper body stability department. During evasive maneuvers, these controls would flop around. That worries me.

                          Whenever safety concerns are raised people tend to talk about how many years they've been doing something with "no problems". Usually that time was incident free. That doesn't then prove that the safety concerns are irrelevant. For instance, my husband has been racing cars for well over 20 yrs. During that time, he has never had a fire. Does that mean that he would consider climbing into the cockpit without his firesuit? Hel, no.

                          Some things we do in order to help avoid a problem. Some things we do in case there happens to be one and some things we should NOT do in case there happens to be a problem. I would not use these controls in case there happened to be a problem.

                          C.

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                            #14
                            ?

                            Originally posted by Tiger Racing
                            In case of an emergency, these controls don't look as secure and steady to use as permanent hand controls. We already suffer in the upper body stability department. During evasive maneuvers, these controls would flop around. That worries me.

                            Whenever safety concerns are raised people tend to talk about how many years they've been doing something with "no problems". Usually that time was incident free. That doesn't then prove that the safety concerns are irrelevant. For instance, my husband has been racing cars for well over 20 yrs. During that time, he has never had a fire. Does that mean that he would consider climbing into the cockpit without his firesuit? Hel, no.

                            Some things we do in order to help avoid a problem. Some things we do in case there happens to be one and some things we should NOT do in case there happens to be a problem. I would not use these controls in case there happened to be a problem.

                            C.
                            T,
                            I have a 6 mile offroad race track on my property that we do a rally school, rally and offroad races, car testing, etc. My "shop" car is a 1996 Crown Vic, 505 Big Block and I've used this car on the track, at high speed, drifting in rough uneven terrain and haven't had any issues. Is there a possibility to have problems? Hell yeah! But I have 3 able bodied friends who have driven the car without hand controls that have had off track experiences. So,..maybe you and your husband with all your experience should just not drive a car if you have that many issues with safety, because you can't ever guarantee 100% safety all of the time in any driving situation.

                            Video of the course

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srvBq4J-ROM
                            Last edited by gpbullock; 1 Sep 2008, 10:57 PM.

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                              #15
                              I used something like that for over a year on the first car I had out of the hospital. Mine had a velcro strap that kept them up by the steering wheel so I ddin't have to always move them when transfering. Kept them at the right length for driving or getting in and out. I never had any problems or accidents with them.

                              I used them not long ago on a rental and tore them apart the other day to put on a lawn mower brake.
                              If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


                              Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

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