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  • Brain can heal the spine

    Brain can heal the spine
    Marlowe Hood
    Tue, 08 Jan 2008

    Tiny nerves crisscrossing the spine can bypass crippling injuries recently written off as irreversible, scientists reported in a study published on Monday.

    Experiments conducted on mice at the University of California in Los Angeles showed for the first time that the central nervous system can rewire itself to create small neural pathways between the brain and the nerve cells that control movement.

    This startling discovery could one day open the way to new therapies for damaged spinal cords and perhaps address conditions stemming from stroke and multiple sclerosis, according to the study.

    Normally, the brain relays messages that control walking or running via neural fibers called axons.

    When these long nerves are crushed or severed — in a road crash or sports accident, for example — these lines of communication are cut, resulting in reduced movement or paralysis.

    "Not long ago, it was assumed that the brain was hard-wired at birth and that there was no capacity to adapt to damage," explained neurobiologist Michael Sofroniew, who led the research.


    more:

    http://health.iafrica.com/healthnews/770345.htm

  • #2
    brain can heal the spine?hmmm...
    why my brain did not help my spine to heal?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by adi chicago
      brain can heal the spine?hmmm...
      why my brain did not help my spine to heal?
      i had the same thoughts. what is the brain waiting for?

      this is another waste of money bull crap study used to waste sci money and time.

      Comment


      • #4
        I think it can happen but only very seldom and we could spend a life time waiting but you can never count out the resiliency of the CNS to repair itself. My own opinion is it would be more with incompletes than completes though. Just my .02.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by DA
          i had the same thoughts. what is the brain waiting for?

          this is another waste of money bull crap study used to waste sci money and time.
          It was an alright experiment. It showed there may be alternate routes. The propriospinal connections are in the core of the spinal cord.

          May explain many walking injuries..when other similar injuries don't regain function. Is it the core of the spinal cord that decides if you will or won't? Since the nerves are so short might also explain why they don't seem to last as long. Maybe enhancing them would save alot of the function of some on this board with SCI that are losing it. Who knows?

          And would it be possible to regenerate this shorter nerve bunch with non-controversial types of treatments?

          The body is capable of rerouting itself. We know this from the motorneurons taking over roles of lost neurons in polio. We know this from arteries bypassing themselves. And without a functioning brain..well.
          Life isn't about getting thru the storm but learning to dance in the rain.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by manouli
            Brain can heal the spine
            Marlowe Hood
            Tue, 08 Jan 2008

            Tiny nerves crisscrossing the spine can bypass crippling injuries recently written off as irreversible, scientists reported in a study published on Monday.

            Experiments conducted on mice at the University of California in Los Angeles showed for the first time that the central nervous system can rewire itself to create small neural pathways between the brain and the nerve cells that control movement.

            This startling discovery could one day open the way to new therapies for damaged spinal cords and perhaps address conditions stemming from stroke and multiple sclerosis, according to the study.

            Normally, the brain relays messages that control walking or running via neural fibers called axons.

            When these long nerves are crushed or severed — in a road crash or sports accident, for example — these lines of communication are cut, resulting in reduced movement or paralysis.

            "Not long ago, it was assumed that the brain was hard-wired at birth and that there was no capacity to adapt to damage," explained neurobiologist Michael Sofroniew, who led the research.


            more:

            http://health.iafrica.com/healthnews/770345.htm

            This is the same study discussed in /forum/showthread.php?t=93805

            Wise.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Wise Young
              This is the same study discussed in /forum/showthread.php?t=93805

              Wise.
              These types of articles are more suited for the research forum..just my humble opinion. It's hard to follow a certain study as it advances or declines when it's all over the place.
              Life isn't about getting thru the storm but learning to dance in the rain.

              Comment


              • #8
                guys a question please ...most of the humans use only 10%of their brain?true or not?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by adi chicago
                  guys a question please ...most of the humans use only 10%of their brain?true or not?
                  Adi, please. It is a myth that we only use 10% of our brain. It is true that some of the time only 10% of our brain may be active but almost all of it is active at different times. In fact, if any part of it is not active for even a couple of days or weeks, it probably will change its function or undergo atrophy.

                  For example, as you know, the visual cortex is responsible for seeing things. When a person is blindfolded for a week, the activity level in the visual cortex declines precipitiously inititally and then is taken over for other activities, such as reading braille with one's fingertips. This occurs in less than a week after blindfolding with dramatic improvement in ability to read braille and visual cortex activity associated with using the fingertips to read braille. It takes a few days for a person to recover sight after the blindfold is removed. This is strong evidence for the plasticity of the brain.

                  Imagine what happens to somebody with spinal cord injury. A person with cervical spinal cord injury has just lost about a third of all the sensory and motor connections to the cortex. That cortex must be doing something else. I have often joked with friends that they should start learning a new language right away. They have all this cortex available. Of course, when the cure happens, you can give it back.

                  Wise.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Wise Young
                    Adi, please. It is a myth that we only use 10% of our brain. It is true that some of the time only 10% of our brain may be active but almost all of it is active at different times. In fact, if any part of it is not active for even a couple of days or weeks, it probably will change its function or undergo atrophy.

                    For example, as you know, the visual cortex is responsible for seeing things. When a person is blindfolded for a week, the activity level in the visual cortex declines precipitiously inititally and then is taken over for other activities, such as reading braille with one's fingertips. This occurs in less than a week after blindfolding with dramatic improvement in ability to read braille and visual cortex activity associated with using the fingertips to read braille. It takes a few days for a person to recover sight after the blindfold is removed. This is strong evidence for the plasticity of the brain.

                    Imagine what happens to somebody with spinal cord injury. A person with cervical spinal cord injury has just lost about a third of all the sensory and motor connections to the cortex. That cortex must be doing something else. I have often joked with friends that they should start learning a new language right away. They have all this cortex available. Of course, when the cure happens, you can give it back.

                    Wise.
                    thank you sir ,great analogy.i will try to keep my cortex busy.cc helped me a lot regarding my written english and grammar.
                    ps.is any evidence for the plasticity of the spinal cord?
                    http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/...neuro.24.1.807
                    Last edited by adi chicago; 01-10-2008, 04:26 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Why am I under the impression this only explains why my leg will move away from hot water without feeling it. Even if you are complete, the same thing will happen. I don't think that's called healing, but your brain is skipping over and telling your body to move. Could be wrong.

                      UCLA is well known for 'finding things out' but then leaving the subject matter for someone else to 'go deeper' into. They hardly ever continue with their findings. So annoying.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        the brain send signals thru the body via spinal cord ...when a shortcut occures[sci] the signals are chaotic .[spasms ,etc.]depends of the severity of injury.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Imight
                          Why am I under the impression this only explains why my leg will move away from hot water without feeling it. Even if you are complete, the same thing will happen. I don't think that's called healing, but your brain is skipping over and telling your body to move. Could be wrong.

                          UCLA is well known for 'finding things out' but then leaving the subject matter for someone else to 'go deeper' into. They hardly ever continue with their findings. So annoying.
                          Its called a reflex.
                          "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

                          -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

                          Comment

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