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  • Breakthrough in repairing damage that causes MS

    09/10/07 - Health section

    Breakthrough in repairing damage that causes MS

    Scientists have developed a radical new drug that could reverse the effects of multiple sclerosis within weeks.

    Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have developed a human antibody administered in a single dose that can repair myelin, the insulating covering of nerves that when damaged can lead to multiple sclerosis.

    The breakthrough will be presented at the American Neurological Association meeting in Washington DC today and the researchers hope a treatment can be developed within years.

    The drug has already been successfully tested on mice and preliminary human trials have begun.

    "The findings could eventually lead to new treatments that could limit permanent disability," said Professor Arthur Warrington, who led the study.

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common disabling neurological condition affecting young adults. Around 85,000 people in Britain have MS. Symptoms range from muscle stiffness and spasms, to speech difficulties and tremors.

    Myelin repair normally occurs spontaneously in healthy humans but with multiple sclerosis and other disorders of the central nervous system the process is very slow or fails altogether.

    The antibody, which was genetically engineered from a single cell, binds to myelin and the surface of cells in the brain and spinal cord, then triggers the cells to begin the repair process, called remyelination.

    The antibody is the first known drug designed to induce repair by acting within the central nervous system on the damaged cells responsible for myelin synthesis.

    "The concept of using natural human antibodies to treat disease of this kind has not yet been tested in humans but these research findings are very promising," said Dr Moses Rodriguez.

    The study used laboratory mouse models of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis in humans.

    Researchers found a small dose equivalent to 5mg in humans of the antibody was needed and took five weeks to work on average.

    As a naturally occurring protein of the immune system, antibodies do not appear to have any side effects, nor are they toxic - even when administered at 4,000 times the minimal effective dose.

    Experts today hailed the discovery but warned that human trials were still some way off.

    Dr Laura Bell of the MS Society said: "Myelin repair is an exciting avenue of research that holds a lot of promise as an MS treatment, which is why we have invested more than £3 million into it at our research centres in Cambridge and Edinburgh.

    "This is an exciting study but it's early days - we'll be keen to see how it works in people with MS."


    Find this story at http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/liv...n_page_id=1774
    ©2007 Associated New Media
    "I QUESS THEY'LL HAVE TO RUN OUT OF RATS, BEFORE THEY TRY IT OUT IN HUMANS. WAKE ME UP WHEN IT'S OVER !!!"

  • #2
    If its so promising why do all the warnings say its still far away from the goal?

    Comment


    • #3
      Eric,

      I feel there is a very cautious attitude when the CNS is involved.

      Read this report carefully, it states even though this breakthrough is a naturally occurring protein safe at 4000 times the minimum effective dose, human trials are still some ways off.

      Like it or not, bitch and complain, clinical trials, even with something as promising as this, are a long-term slow moving process. I hate it.
      Last edited by Schmeky; 10-09-2007, 09:22 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        If aliens from space visit Earth and as gift gave us the cures to all. They would withold it. its about the research. they need the disable community to justify the research.

        Comment


        • #5
          Wonder which antibody they're referring to.

          The drug has already been successfully tested on mice and preliminary human trials have begun.
          Experts today hailed the discovery but warned that human trials were still some way off.


          Ah, here it is:

          The Mayo Clinic's Arthur Warrington, PhD, and colleagues tested a lab-made antibody called rHIgM22.

          http://www.webmd.com/multiple-sclero...src=RSS_PUBLIC

          Sounds like it would be a good candidate for the FDA's new fast track clinical trials program. Wonder if this could help SCI's suffering from demyelination.
          Last edited by antiquity; 10-09-2007, 10:56 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Sounds good.

            A recombinant human monoclonal IgM, rHIgM22, promotes the synthesis of new myelin when used to treat several animal models of demyelination. rHIgM22 binds to myelin and the surface of oligodendrocytes and accumulates at central nervous system lesions in vivo. The minimal dose of monoclonal IgM required to promote remyelination has a direct bearing on the proposed mechanism of action. A dose ranging study using rHIgM22 was performed in mice with chronic virus-induced demyelination, a model of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The lowest tested dose of rHIgM22 effective at promoting spinal cord remyelination was a single 500-ng intraperitoneal bolus injection. A time course study of spinal cord repair performed in chronically demyelinated mice revealed that remyelination plateaued by 5 weeks following treatment with rHIgM22...
            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/en...ubmed_RVDocSum

            Comment


            • #7
              Multiple Sclerosis Nerve Damage Repaired By Scientists

              Multiple Sclerosis Nerve Damage Repaired By Scientists

              quote:

              "The repair of chronic spinal cord injury is seldom modeled in laboratory studies, but it is an important reality for the treatment of humans. The concept of using natural human antibodies to treat disease of this kind has not yet been tested in humans, but these research findings are very promising," said author, Moses Rodriguez, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurologist.


              http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/85087.php

              Comment


              • #8
                Being a walking quad, im very excited about this!!!!!
                "I'm manic as hell-
                But I'm goin' strong-
                Left my meds on the sink again-
                My head will be racing by lunchtime"

                <----Scott Weiland---->

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ineedmyelin
                  Being a walking quad, im very excited about this!!!!!
                  this is win the lottery news for you and a large percent of sci people. its not toxic at high doses which is the common excuses for sci treatments. the focus now should be to get this to bedside.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I know and have worked with Moses Rodriguez. I have the highest respect for his work and his science. This is a very important discovery.

                    It is more than just the discovery of a natural IgM antibody that stimulates remyelination. This is one of the so-called germ cell line antibody, an antibody that is coded in the genome, an antibody that acts as a signal for certain biological activities such as remyelination.

                    Wise.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks Wise. Can this compound be easily obtained or reproduced by other labs. Is its scope limited to treating demyelination caused by disease? If not, would it have potential for treating SCI's with primarily white matter damage? Also, are those with UMN damage more likely to respond to remyelination therapies?
                      Last edited by antiquity; 10-13-2007, 10:20 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Compare to 4-AP

                        Dr. Young:

                        How does this compare to the way 4-AP works?

                        Will it slow down Acorda's trials?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by AHerzlich
                          Dr. Young:

                          How does this compare to the way 4-AP works?

                          Will it slow down Acorda's trials?
                          This is an antibody that stimulates oligodendroglial cells to remyelinate. It is probably a natural antibody and all (or most of us humans) should have the antibody, I believe.

                          You know that there is a treatment where they give IgG (immunoglobulins) from the blood bank to people with multiple sclerosis. In any case, Moses Rodriguez had found antibodies that stimulate the central nervous system to remyelinate. This may be why IgG treatments work. I believe that this is that treatment.

                          Wise.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Colin, our friend , Barbara, and I visited Dr. Rodriguez's lab at Mayo on June 15, 2007. The following is an excerpt of our visit summary (approved for publication by Dr. Rodriguez):



                            "...Dr. Rodriguez has developed antibodies that stimulate repair of the Central Nervous System. A culmination of more than two decades of work, this research holds great promise for people who have diseases and injuries that damage the CNS such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and SCI.

                            When a spinal cord is injured, there is often a combination of injury to the myelin sheath (the insulation around nerve cells) and cell death. One series of antibodies developed by Dr. Rodriguez that stimulates repair of the myelin sheath is very close to receiving FDA approval to move to human clinic trial in the MS patient model. Confident approval is imminent, Dr. Rodriguez is making plans to begin trials by the end of 2007. If results are as expected, he theorizes chronic SCI could be next.

                            Although he was very clear his research is geared toward MS patients, he has a secondary interest in the chronic SCI model and feels his research will be translatable from MS to SCI. Already, another series of antibodies look promising to stimulate axonal regeneration. Asked about the scar formation in the chronic SCI as a barrier, he shared he does not believe it presents an insurmountable problem.

                            With continued funding, his research to develop antibodies that stimulate axon regeneration will move forward. Repair of the myelin sheath along with axonal regeneration look promising to lead to meaningful functional recovery for people with SCI."

                            It was a very fascinating, exciting, and hopeful visit. Wise--Moses speaks very highly of you.

                            Definitely research our community should be watching and supporting.

                            Susan
                            Last edited by Susan M; 10-14-2007, 11:21 AM.
                            Please submit your photo and story of hope:

                            http://bridges2hope.unite2fightparalysis.org/


                            http://unite2fightparalysis.org/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Susan M
                              Colin, our friend , Barbara, and I visited Dr. Rodriguez's lab at Mayo on June 15, 2007. The following is an excerpt of our visit summary (approved for publication by Dr. Rodriguez):



                              "...Dr. Rodriguez has developed antibodies that stimulate repair of the Central Nervous System. A culmination of more than two decades of work, this research holds great promise for people who have diseases and injuries that damage the CNS such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and SCI.

                              When a spinal cord is injured, there is often a combination of injury to the myelin sheath (the insulation around nerve cells) and cell death. One series of antibodies developed by Dr. Rodriguez that stimulates repair of the myelin sheath is very close to receiving FDA approval to move to human clinic trial in the MS patient model. Confident approval is imminent, Dr. Rodriguez is making plans to begin trials by the end of 2007. If results are as expected, he theorizes chronic SCI could be next.

                              Although he was very clear his research is geared toward MS patients, he has a secondary interest in the chronic SCI model and feels his research will be translatable from MS to SCI. Already, another series of antibodies look promising to stimulate axonal regeneration. Asked about the scar formation in the chronic SCI as a barrier, he shared he does not believe it presents an insurmountable problem.

                              With continued funding, his research to develop antibodies that stimulate axon regeneration will move forward. Repair of the myelin sheath along with axonal regeneration look promising to lead to meaningful functional recovery for people with SCI."

                              It was a very facinating, exciting, and hopeful visit. Wise--Moses speaks very highly of you.

                              Definitely research our community should be watching and supporting.

                              Susan
                              So this is applicable to demyelination due to injury. Thanks Susan.

                              Wise, do you know of any animal studies involving rHIgM22 and SCI. I couldn't find any. Would they even be necessary if efficacy is shown in human MS subjects? Also, are those with UMN damage more likely to respond to remyelination therapies?

                              Comment

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