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    Originally posted by George78 View Post
    Don't you think we should update the Clinical Trials sticky with a big warning refering to Dr. Davies recommandations?..

    I think that the discovery of the team of Dr. Davies is a major milestone, it could give an explanation of 20 years of unsuccesfull neural stem cells transplantations in the CNS..
    G78
    George,

    Geron, Stem Cell Inc., ChinaSCINet are now carrying out clinical trials transplanting cells into the spinal cord of people. In the case of Geron, they are transplanting oligodendroglial progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. Stem Cell Inc. is transplanting neural stem cells that include astrocytes into the spinal cord of people. ChinaSCINet is transplanting HLA-matched umbilical cord blood cells into the spinal cord. I know of at least half a dozen clinics around the world that have transplanted autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem and stromal cells intravenously, intra-arterially, or intrathecally to the spinal cord.

    Although some of the these transplants have been associated with transient (2-3 weeks) increase of neuropathic pain, most of these have not caused significant amounts of long lasting neuropathic pain or allodynia. In some of the cases, the transient onset of neuropathic pain seems to precede the recovery of sensory function in the patients. I would think that human clinical experience suggests that many types of cells can be transplanted into the spinal cord without the kinds of complications that Dr. Davies is talking about. It is important that limited animal experience not be used to stop clinical trials from going forward. If, for example, a cell transplant were to cause the kind of complications that Dr. Davies is talking about, one should be cautious about going forward with further clinical studies.

    It is not true that 20 years of experience with stem cell transplants has been completely negative. In the case of olfactory ensheathing glial cells, a uniform experience of over half a dozen groups suggest that the cells restore sensory function to several dermatomes below the injury site. Motor recovery is limited. We shall soon see if the current ciinical trials show signficant functional benefits. It is not a good idea to block progress in clinical trials based on limited animal data.

    The sparse motor recovery can be for many reasons besides the one that Dr. Davies is talking about. For example, most of the groups used non-HLA matched fetal allografts that are probably rejected within a few weeks after transplantation, leading short-term and limited recovery. Another reason for lack of recovery is that few of the groups have coupled their cell transplantation with intensive motor training. Evidence is accumulating that motor recovery requires training. Finally, there is an open question whether any single cell transplant would really do the job of allowing axons to grow across the injury site and extend all the way up and down the spinal cord. The transplants may have to be coupled with therapies such as chondroitinase, lithium, nogo antibodies, cethrin, etc. to yield signicant long distance regeneration for chronic spinal cord injury.

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 6 May 2011, 9:43 AM.

    Comment


      I would think that human clinical experience suggests that many types of cells can be transplanted into the spinal cord without the kinds of complications that Dr. Davies is talking about. It is important that limited animal experience not be used to stop clinical trials from going forward. If, for example, a cell transplant were to cause the kind of complications that Dr. Davies is talking about, one should be cautious about going forward with further clinical studies.
      It is my belief Davies is comfortable in the lab . . . . . . .

      Comment


        Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
        The transplants may have to be coupled with therapies such as chondroitinase, lithium, nogo antibodies, cethrin, etc. to yield signicant long distance regeneration for chronic spinal cord injury. Wise.
        And, potentially Decorin to eliminate the scar problem...
        http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

        Comment


          Grammy which stem cells Davies will be using and when he plans to start trials?

          Dr Wise if ur trials recover bladder bowel and sexual function in patients then do u think this treatment can work for conus injuries with bladder bowel and sexual problems?

          Comment


            Jawaid
            i am with you on bladder bowel and sexual problems? If we could get that back it would be nice to start with. and let the walking to come after ? well not that long after but you know what i main
            AS I SIT HERE IN MY CHAIR . I LOOK OUT UPON THE GROUND .I WONDER WILL I EVER GET UP AND WALK A ROUND ??


            http://justadollarplease.org

            Comment


              When ever he can he will.

              Comment


                Colorado Public Radio interview with Dr. Davies on 4/11/2011.

                Here is the original link:
                http://www.cpr.org/#load_article|CU_...s_Breakthrough

                The mp3 is attached just in the original link is no longer available.

                Comment


                  According to the interview remarks, it appears they are putting together information and coordinating future international clinical trials (China, Europe...) This is wonderful. Full steam ahead on getting this valuable research into human trials. Thanks litespeed4, for posting the radio webcast so we could all hear the interview.
                  http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by litespeed4 View Post
                    Colorado Public Radio interview with Dr. Davies on 4/11/2011.

                    Here is the original link:
                    http://www.cpr.org/#load_article|CU_...s_Breakthrough

                    The mp3 is attached just in the original link is no longer available.
                    Thanks for sharing!
                    Don't ask what clinical trials can do for you, ask what you can do for clinical trials.

                    Fenexy: Proyecto Volver a Caminar

                    http://www.fenexy.org (soon in english too)

                    Comment


                      Sweden is collaborating with Craig Hospital in Colorado, on some cell systems on SCI repair, if I am not too lazy remembering, stuff explained by the Swedes.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Leif View Post
                        Sweden is collaborating with Craig Hospital in Colorado, on some cell systems on SCI repair, if I am not too lazy remembering, stuff explained by the Swedes.
                        I'm not holding my breath on that one. Here is a link on that research:

                        http://www.proneuron.com/news/Cov03_04/Cov03_04_09.html

                        Nice article (especially since the first paragraph is one of the only times I have ever seen SCI's accurately described in the mainstream media), but note that the procedure must be implemented within fourteen days of the accident. Even worse, the article's date is 2004. What has happened since then?

                        I live about 35 miles from Craig. I have been there twice, once for an "outpatient evaluation" and once for one of Dr. Falci's "detethering" operations. I do not feel that they are leading the way. In fact, I think they are dragging their feet. Take a look at their "research" programs:

                        http://www.craighospital.org/Foundation/areasofneed.asp

                        Everything is based in the past. It's all about getting used to being paralyzed, nothing about getting cured.

                        Half of Craig is devoted to SCI patients. Half is devoted to traumatic brain injuries (TBI's). For decades they have been wallowing around doing ineffective therapies. There is one, and only one, treatment for TBI that actually works. It is called hyperbaric oxygen therapy or HBOT. Do an internet search for "hyperbaric OR hbot traumatic brain injury". There are dozens of peer reviewed studies that show that it works. The Army has pilot programs in place to treat Iraq war veterans with TBI's suffered from roadside bombs. It is incredibly effective.

                        How many hyperbaric chambers does Craig have?

                        None...

                        If TBI's and SCI's were cured, Craig would be out of business. They don't want that. They are a business.

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by litespeed4 View Post
                          Colorado Public Radio interview with Dr. Davies on 4/11/2011.
                          A lot of this we already knew from the PLoS paper. The new part to me was the emphasis he placed on the fact that:

                          a) The human-derived stem cells worked as well or better than the rat-derived stem cells.

                          b) This means that there is no reason why this technique won't work in humans also.

                          So it seems to me that he feels ready to take this technology to human trials. The difficulties, of course are:

                          1) Funding.

                          2) FDA approval.

                          But just keep your eyes on the prize!

                          Don't forget what he has demonstrated:

                          i) Partially paralyzed rats (fully paralyzed rats would die from starvation) can walk completely normally within a couple of weeks after applying the treatment.

                          ii) There is NO additional neuropathic pain (allodynia) involved in this technique.

                          Please compare these results against anything that any lab is doing anywhere in the world with any techniques. If you find something better, please let me know. If you don't, please contribute to help speed up Dr. Davies' research. Thanks!

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by Charles Hansen View Post

                            Please compare these results against anything that any lab is doing anywhere in the world with any techniques. If you find something better, please let me know. If you don't, please contribute to help speed up Dr. Davies' research. Thanks!
                            I think this group is ahead of Davies, given they have:

                            -published results with chronic injuries
                            -published results with larger mammals (pigs)
                            -are scheduled to actually start trials on humans this year

                            Here are some published results:

                            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16713677

                            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18813110

                            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16713677

                            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15129154

                            Comment


                              ii) There is NO additional neuropathic pain (allodynia) involved in this technique
                              -are scheduled to actually start trials on humans this year

                              Are these the 2 missing pieces?

                              1. I'm not seeing any reference to neuropathic pain in the publication. (extremely important) How much pain to expect?
                              2. I'm not finding the scheduled start on humans.
                              Last edited by GRAMMY; 13 May 2011, 10:38 AM.
                              http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by quadfather View Post
                                I think this group is ahead of Davies, given they have:

                                -published results with chronic injuries
                                -published results with larger mammals (pigs)
                                -are scheduled to actually start trials on humans this year

                                Here are some published results:

                                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16713677

                                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18813110

                                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16713677

                                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15129154
                                Thank you for the links. This is very interesting and I would like to read more. Is there any way to read the full text besides paying $31.50 per article?

                                Also, one of the links was a duplicate which may explain Grammy's question about the human studies. The most recent paper linked was three years old. I'm sure they have made progress since then. Is there a thread dedicated to this work?

                                Again, thank you for contributing this.

                                Comment

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