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    from the article,

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    Our HuCNS-SC cells are already in clinical testing for the brain, and we have announced plans to initiate a clinical trial for spinal cord injury later this year. This collaboration advances our mission to develop novel treatments for diseases of all three elements of the central nervous system – the brain, the spinal cord and the eye.”

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    Originally posted by Bhaskar
    StemCells Employs Casey Eye Institute to Test Neural Stem Cell Product for Treating Retinal Degeneration

    StemCells will work with the Oregon Health & Science University Casey Eye Institute to evaluate its purified human neural stem cell candidate, HuCNS-SC®, as a treatment for retinal degeneration.

    The parties will investigate engraftment and function of HuCNS-SC cells in a well established rat model of the disease as preparatory studies for planned clinical trials. The research is expected to be concluded by year end, according to StemCells.

    More : http://www.genengnews.com/news/bnite...source=genwire
    http://justadollarplease.org/

    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member

    "You kids and your cures, why back when I was injured they gave us a wheelchair and that's the way it was and we liked it!" Grumpy Old Man

    .."i used to be able to goof around so much because i knew Superman had my back. now all i've got is his example -- and that's gonna have to be enough."

    Comment


      FRI., JAN 25, 2008 - 5:22 PM
      Keep politicians out of stem-cell science

      A Wisconsin State Journal editorial

      The work of world-renown scientist James Thomson and others at UW-Madison has made Wisconsin a leading center of stem-cell research.
      That research leadership has presented the state with a chance to also become a leading center for the translation of stem-cell research into businesses producing high-paying jobs for Wisconsin residents.

      It 's an opportunity the state cannot afford to squander.

      That 's why state lawmakers should have paid close attention to Gov. Jim Doyle 's State of the State speech this week, when he explained why Wisconsin has stayed at the forefront of stem-cell innovation:

      "Because we kept politicians out of it. "

      The politicians should remain out of it.

      more:

      http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/opin...9395&ntpid%3D1

      Comment


        Device able to pull stem cells from blood


        Published: Jan. 25, 2008 at 11:13 PM


        Font size:ROCHESTER, N.Y., Jan. 25 (UPI) -- A tiny, implantable device can pull adult stem cells out of a living rat with greater purity than any present technique, a U.S. study found.

        The device was designed by Michael R. King, who was studying how white blood cells, called neutrophils, know how to migrate to a point of infection. He observed that near an injury, the walls of the nearby blood vessels expressed an adhesive protein and if passing neutrophils brushed against selectins they stick to the vessel wall, but did remain struck, the neutrophils rolled to the site.

        more:
        http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Health/...om_blood/7082/

        Comment


          Stems here, stems there, stems cells in every part of our bodies. How doctors could not know this years ago?


          Scientists in stemcell world first

          26th January 2008, 11:30 WST



          Scientists from the University of WA have found readily available stemcells in human breast milk.

          The world-first discovery of a source of easily harvested stemcells promises to remove the ethical and practical barriers that now limit the extraction of the precursor cells from embryos and through cloning.

          Biomedical scientist Mark Cregan, who headed the work to be presented at next week’s international conference of the Society for Research on Human Milk and Lactation in Perth, said the findings of potentially reprogrammable breast and immune stemcells in human milk could lead to regeneration of some mammary tissues following surgery and treatments to overcome breastfeeding problems.

          more:

          http://www.thewest.com.au/default.as...ontentID=55998

          Comment


            Blind man now has partial vision thanks to stem cell surgery

            Posted

            By Elizabeth Donatelli

            LOUISVILLE (WAVE) -- A California man set world records skiing, worked as a CIA analyst, and inventor all while blind in both eyes. Now, after more than four decades of living life blind, a rare stem-cell surgery has given him the gift of sight. He can now see colors, shapes -- and his children for the first time. WAVE 3's Elizabeth Donatelli has his story.

            Mike May recalls the first time the darkness was lifted. "He took the bandages off and then woosh!" said Mike May. "All this light comes in, and I'm seeing somebody standing next to me like you and I'm seeing objects around and all this visual information starts flooding in at this incredible rate and I thought: 'Oh my gosh! I can see! This is amazing.

            more:

            http://www.wave3.com/Global/story.as...1&nav=menu31_6

            Comment


              Turning on adult stem cells may help repair bone

              Potential new approach to treating osteoporosis, other degenerative conditions

              The use of a drug to activate stem cells that differentiate into bone appears to cause regeneration of bone tissue and be may be a potential treatment strategy for osteoporosis, according to a report in the February 2008 Journal of Clinical Investigation. The study – led by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) – found that treatment with a medication used to treat bone marrow cancer improved bone density in a mouse model of osteoporosis, apparently through its effect on the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that differentiate into several types of tissues, according to a press release issued by EurekAlert

              more:

              http://www.thehindu.com/holnus/008200801261621.htm

              Comment


                Saturday, January 26, 2008 :: Alina Boey
                Adult Stem Cells Beneficial in Heart Failure Recovery

                Administration of adult bone marrow stem cells and mesenchymal stems cells can aid in the recovery of heart attacks,

                Melbourne, Australia - infoZine - A study in the Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology published by Wiley-Blackwell shows that administration of adult bone marrow stem cells (BMC) and mesenchymal stems cells (MSC) can aid in the recovery of myocardial infarction (MI) - commonly known as heart attack - and consequently increase survival rates.

                The study - "Systemic Delivery of Adult Stem cells Improves Cardiac Function in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats" - is designed to evaluate the impact of systemic delivery of BMC and MSC on spontaneously hypertensive rats induced with MI.

                more:

                http://www.infozine.com/news/stories...iew/sid/26649/

                Comment


                  Money for stem cell research - Borough could be home to groundbreaking new therapies

                  Two borough not-for-profit research institutions were among 25 institutions statewide to receive one-year development grants to support stem cell research and training.

                  The SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue in Flatbush, received $192,267, and Polytechnic University, 6 MetroTech Center in Downtown Brooklyn, re-ceived $100,000.

                  The $14.5 million total in first grant awards comes through the state’s $600 million multi-year stem cell research initiative that Gov. Eliot Spitzer funded in the 2007-08 budget.

                  “Innovative stem cell research has the potential to yield therapies that may prevent, treat and perhaps even cure many debilitating and life-threatening conditions,” said Spitzer.

                  more:

                  http://www.parkslopecourier.com/site...d=560112&rfi=6

                  Comment


                    Diabetes: Pancreas Progenitors - several sources/contacts/photos

                    Hurt an Organ, Help a Disease?

                    Researchers report that by injuring an animal's pancreas, they have found a population of cells that naturally become insulin-producers. It's not clear whether the find will impact diabetes patients, but researchers are intrigued by the discovery and what it might reveal about the transformative ability of pancreatic cells.In people with diabetes, insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, have been destroyed or may behave sluggishly. This leaves the body unable to regulate its blood sugar. Coaxing the
                    pancreas to make new beta cells is one of the great goals of diabetes research. Scientists debated for years whether the pancreas holds stem cells that could replenish beta cells, but in 2004, biologists led by Douglas Melton at Harvard looked for these stem cells in the pancreas of mice and failed to find them. His team instead reported that existing beta cells could multiply to form new ones (ScienceNOW, 5 May 2004).

                    Harry Heimberg of Vrije Universiteit in Brussels, Belgium, wondered whether there were additional sources of new beta cells. Earlier experiments in rats had found that clamping a pancreatic duct and stopping digestive enzymes from entering the small intestine roughly doubles the mass of beta cells in the pancreas. But which cells in the pancreas were generating these extra beta cells?

                    More : http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi...ull/2008/124/4

                    http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=...ncreas-healing

                    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-epp012508.php

                    Comment


                      Osteop - turning on the bone makers

                      Turning on adult stem cells may help repair bone
                      Potential new approach to treating osteoporosis, other degenerative conditions
                      The use of a drug to activate stem cells that differentiate into bone appears to cause regeneration of bone tissue and be may be a potential treatment strategy for osteoporosis, according to a report in the February 2008 Journal of Clinical Investigation. The study – led by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) – found that treatment with a medication used to treat bone marrow cancer improved bone density in a mouse model of osteoporosis, apparently through its effect on the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that differentiate into several types of tissues.

                      "Stem cell therapies are often thought of as putting new cells into the body, but this study suggests that medications can turn on existing stem cells that reside in the body's tissues, acting as regenerative medicines to enhance the body's own repair mechanisms," says David Scadden, MD, director of the MGH Center for Regenerative Medicine and HSCI co-director. "Drugs that direct immature cells to become a particular cell type, like in this study, could potentially be very useful."

                      More : http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-toa012508.php

                      http://uk.reuters.com/article/health...37473620080125

                      Comment


                        Embryos Discarded During IVF Create Stem Cell Lines

                        Study says it's a possible source for such cell lines without the ethical issues
                        Posted 1/28/08

                        MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Embryos discarded from in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics can be used to create stem cell lines, new research suggests.

                        Researchers from Children's Hospital Boston said this is the first study to show it's possible to derive stem cells from poor-quality IVF embryos, which could prove to be an important source of stem cells for research. Their report is published in the Jan. 27 online edition of Nature Biology.

                        more:

                        http://health.usnews.com/usnews/heal...cell-lines.htm

                        Comment


                          Stem cell transplants may be beneficial for stroke victims


                          Washington, January 28 (ANI): Two separate studies have shown that human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) and bone marrow stromal cell (BMSCs) transplantation, respectively, may be beneficial for stroke victims.
                          Both studies tracked the migration of chemically tagged transplanted stem cells to determine the degree to which the transplanted cells reached damaged areas of the brain, and became therapeutically active.

                          One of the studies was conducted by Korean researchers, wherein hMSCs were transplanted into animal stroke models with cerebral artery occlusion and tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at two days, one week, two weeks, six weeks and ten weeks after transplant.

                          more:

                          http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/..._10014977.html

                          Comment


                            NYU gets $1.5m for stem cell research

                            Jane C. Timm and Reem Nasr
                            Issue date: 1/28/08 Section: University


                            more:

                            Two NYU research institutions received a combined grant of $1.5 million from New York State to fund stem cell research, the state press office announced Jan. 7.

                            The NYU Medical Center and the Office of the Dean for Science were awarded $999,715 and $553,000, respectively, from a $14.6 million fund that the state hopes will jump-start its biomedical research capabilities.

                            continue:
                            http://media.www.nyunews.com/media/s...-3171422.shtml

                            Comment


                              Flawed embryos seen as source for stem cells


                              By Colin Nickerson

                              Globe Staff / January 28, 2008

                              From what is now considered medical waste might be fashioned bio-treasure: stem cells able to form into any of the body's 220 cell types, including blood, nerves, bone, and skin tissue, new research suggests.

                              The poor quality embryos are "an ethically acceptable source" for

                              the creation of stem cell lines.

                              Scientist George Q. Daley


                              Scientists at Children's Hospital Boston have forged stem cells from the "flawed" and "poor quality" early-stage embryos that in vitro fertilization clinics discard by the hundreds of thousands every year, according to research published yesterday in the journal Nature Biotechnology.

                              These are embryos created by IVF technicians but culled because abnormalities make them unsuitable for implantation into the wombs of women unable to conceive naturally. The embryos, usually containing no more than a few score cells, are deemed medical waste and simply tossed away.

                              Such embryos can "provide a reliable source for embryonic stem derivation," said Dr. Paul H. Lerou, lead author of the study and a neonatologist at Children's and Brigham & Women's Hospital.

                              Stem cells are thought to represent medicine's single best hope for healing damaged heart cells, mending shattered spinal cords, and curing or treating an array of other horrendous afflictions.

                              The cells derived from low-quality embryos may be limited to use in general stem cell research because they might carry tiny abnormalities making them too risky for direct patient therapy, said George Q. Daley, a stem cell scientist at Children's and the study's senior author.

                              more:

                              http://www.boston.com/news/science/a...s+paper+A+to+Z

                              Comment


                                Pahang to Host World's Largest Stem Cell Manufacturing Plant

                                By Jeeva Arulampalam

                                THE East Coast Economic Region (ECER) will host the world's largest stem cell manufacturing facility when US-based Bio-Cellular Research Organisation (BCRO) sets up operations there.

                                Pahang Technology Resources Sdn Bhd and BCRO Stem Cell Xenotransplantation Sdn Bhd will sign a memorandum of understanding on January 28, witnessed by Prime Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, the ECER Secretariat said in a statement issued yesterday.

                                more:

                                http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/...ource=r_health

                                Comment

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