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    #16
    Originally posted by kate
    Time for lunch . . . I think I get to share a meal with my best buddy Leschinsky, whom I just met. She's great!

    While the battery charges and I get some nourishment, get ready for the next act . . keynote speech by Wise.
    Kate you are doing greatttttt girl! I can't wait for Dr. Young to speak lol. Have a nice lunch, and come baCK SOON! You are better than TV reporters.
    manouli.

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      #17
      Originally posted by manouli
      Kate you are doing greatttttt girl! I can't wait for Dr. Young to speak lol. Have a nice lunch, and come baCK SOON! You are better than TV reporters.
      manouli.
      I agree. I already feel shamed by Dogger and Carbar's attendance and now Kate's commentary is making me want to be there even more. Especially if she's lunching with Kinky Les!

      Thanks Kate
      C5/6 incomplete

      "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

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        #18
        great job kate and all cc members who are there.god bless you.i wished i was able to be there .

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          #19
          Thank You Kate!!!

          Your "blow by blow" is fabulous! Thank you so much for being there for those of us who couldn't make it this year.
          Mimi

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            #20
            THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU! This is great Kate, you rock

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              #21
              Many, many thanks, Kate. You've made it so we're there even when we're physically not.

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                #22
                Originally posted by RehabRhino
                I agree. I already feel shamed by Dogger and Carbar's attendance and now Kate's commentary is making me want to be there even more. Especially if she's lunching with Kinky Les!

                Thanks Kate
                Seconded, especially lunch with LesKinky.

                Will have to conquer the fear of the aisle chair by next year!

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                  #23
                  A

                  THANK YOU A MILLION TIMES OVER KATE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This is so great, I am so so sad that I'm not there today. Thank you, thank you, thank youi!! Be sure to take a big group photo and post it!
                  Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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                    #24
                    Sue is introducing Dr. Young. She describes her first meeting with Wise, in which she thought she might get a photo op and a few minutes--and ended up talking for 2 hours. (Not a surprise to anyone who has met him.)

                    So looking forward to this . . . last year he only got a few minutes.

                    He says he's thought a bout what to say a lot since he was asked . . . I need to speak fast because there's so much material to cover.

                    Starting historically . . .slide is up that begins at 3000 bc . . .a papyrus that said "do not treat."

                    Not much happened until the end of 1960's which is when Dr. Young got "dragged into" this area.

                    The 1990's are thought by some to be the "decade of the brain", but he thinks of it as the decade of the spinal cord.

                    axonal growth inhibitors, cell transplants, apoptosis in subacute injury, learned non-use in the scntral nervous system, plasticity of the cord, remyelination of axons, first gene therapy

                    so, in 2000-2010, cell therapies

                    Closer look at the 1990's, listing what we've all been hearing about for so long.

                    Surgical therapies, and the difference in treatment between 1990 and today. Before 1990, sci was a "vale of tears" for hospitals, and no one wanted to take patients because they stayed forever and were very difficult to treat. Today hospitals enthusiastically treat sci patients (and make a lot of money off them.)

                    Syrineomyelic cysts used to have an 80% surgical failure rate--now have 80% success rate. Urological problems used to kill more sci people than any other problem now is not even in the top five.

                    Peripheral nerve bridging --even the "crude" early attempts -- taught him to have confidence that if axons are given a path to grow, they'll take it, and they'll reconnect, and there will be functional recovery.

                    He met a man Xiao in 2001 who figured out how to bridge spinal nerves below the injury to the bladder . . . people dismissed him. Wise and this man worked in the same place for 20 years . . .tells us that we need to invite this person to come here and talk with us. He has video showing men peeing in 3-foot streams! We laugh, but Wise says this is amazing because what the guy has done is shown that the cord is EXTREMELY plastic. It can learn how to do things that are, like, none of its business.

                    I'm not saying that rats are walking and therefore people will walk. I'm telling you that we can get axons to grow, and when they do we can teach them what to do.
                    On to Medical Therapies (We're still looking at what's happend in recent years . . . the first part of this speech is all about history . . . ) a lot of things here about treatment of neuropathic pain, none of which will be new to you all

                    On to Rehabilitative Therapies

                    FES, Central Pattern Generator, Locomotor training, Reverse of Learned Non-Use, Locomotor Devices

                    Talking about the clinical trial in CA in which 90% of incompletes in both the locomotor group AND in the standard rehab walked . . . key seems to have been that ALL the patients were told that there was a chance.

                    On to Regenerative Therapies

                    Axon growth inhibitors--lists 6 of them, some of which have already been shown to work at blocking the inhibitors from shutting down axonal growth.

                    Purine nucleotides--3 of these, Therapeutic vaccines, growth Factors, Cyclic AMP, c1 Cell Adhesion Molecule

                    On to Cell Transplant Therapies, and then Remyelinative Therapies

                    And . . . Emerging Promising Therapies. He says we have an embarrassment of riches! We have so many promising areas to explore that we're having a hard time deciding which ones to use.

                    Why have so many promising therapies been left alone when so many people need them? $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

                    He lists recent clinical trials. This is one of Wise's overwhelming slides with a ton of technical information, which I'll let you get off the video or from his papers.

                    2 years ago when he went to Asia, he found that Dr. Huang had done more than 500 patients with OEG cells . .

                    I'm looking at this list 9 Chinese researchers who have collectively worked on more than a thousand patients. Sadly, most of these trials have not been well-structured. Wise's plan was to superimpose a clinical trial structure on this energetic but haphazard situation. Working . . .

                    New slide about OEG cells. Fetal OEG cells were injected into animals . . . results were that you needed cyclosporin to keep the cells from dying after about 4 weeks. The OEG slides are amazing. They mylenate axons extremely successfully, and (Wise is saying) this is not just pie in the sky.

                    The problem is that we have not had a cell that we transplant that is immunologically the same. The one place this has been done with OEGs is in Brisbane, Australia. Wise says that he's eagerly awaiting those results, (us too, Dr. Young).

                    Says that neural stem cells are much easier to grow than hesc. (Where do we get neural stem cells?)

                    Talking about how you can use lithium together with neural cells to get a big boost in growth. The great thing about lithium is that it's "cheap as dirt" and already tested for safety.

                    Generations of SCI Therapies

                    We're now finishing the 1st generation of therapies, which had modest results for only a limited number of people.

                    We're ready to go crazy on the 2nd generation, but need a great deal more $$$$$$$$

                    The 3rd generation will be standardized treatments that look awfully like cures.

                    We need to bridge the injury site, get the axons to grow, and stop the growth blockers . . . combinations of things which it would be ridiculous to do test one at a time because we already know that we need the combinations. They must be systematically tested.

                    China SCI Network

                    There are 15 leading centers

                    BEgan in February 2004, had the first investigator meeting that September.

                    Now have a single standard used all across the country.

                    List of 5 Clinical trials, ending with a Phase 3 on chronics, will get umbilical cord blood cell transplants and either lithium or placebo and followed up for 1 year. This trial is called CN 103. Probably in 2008. Will involve 400 patients.

                    How is this funded? Right now, from private donations of $6 million in Hong Kong. Hope is that if the early trials are successful, corporate money would follow.

                    Posting, time for questions

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                      #25
                      So, thx for all your comments; I so wish you were here too--while people are milling around, if anybody has anything they want asked, post it and I'll try to ask when it's question time.

                      Professorix is right here in front of me, he says hello everybody!

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                        #26
                        "List of 5 Clinical trials, ending with a Phase 3 on chronics, will get umbilical cord blood cell transplants and either lithium or placebo and followed up for 1 year. This trial is called CN 103. Probably in 2008. Will involve 400 patients."

                        Supposing this therapy was successful, would the patient have a second transplant or would this be a single treatment? Just wondering what their thoughts are.

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                          #27
                          Kate,

                          Excellent job. Thanx.

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                            #28
                            My thoughts exactly

                            Originally posted by RehabRhino
                            Kate's commentary is making me want to be there even more. Especially if she's lunching with Kinky Les!

                            Thanks Kate
                            Yeah, thanks Kate.
                            And thanks to eveybody that is there to give you something to write about.

                            Jeff
                            Doh!

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                              #29
                              it would be ridiculous to do test one at a time because we already know that we need the combinations. They must be systematically tested.
                              Thank goodness Wise doesn't work for MP
                              Last edited by Schmeky; 22 Apr 2007, 3:25 PM.

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                                #30
                                NOTE: This is John Smith. Kate is running an errand. I will live blog until she returns.


                                The afternoon events begin with Joeseph Canose, of the CDRF. He laments having to follow, first of all Dr. Young's definitive presentation and secondly, the lunch break.

                                His topic is the North American Clinical Trial Network.

                                Safety is the primary consideration in early phases of CTs.

                                It comes witht the territory that CTs take a long time. Safety, efficacy, and liability considerations take a long long time. The purpose of the NACTN is to speed up this process by providing collaboration of effort. A uniform clinical trial design aimed speifically at SCI makes for a more efficient effort with better outcomes.

                                The establishment of criteria for inclusion in a CT helps researchers to better understand the trial results. SCI is a dynamic condition subject to changes as the body heals and the symptoms evolve. Individuals also intervene in their SCI condition based on their resources and support. Consequently, trials must consider the history of the participants in CTs in order to analyse and understand the results.

                                The NACTN is, therefore, creating a database of SCI individuals and establishing centers where procedures are standarized by those enrolled in the network. In effect, the CDRF is creating a control group from which to draw participants. The data registry was established in 2005. This is a new development and they are evaluating SCIs based on things such as hand function, etc.

                                CDRF was awarded a $3M Dept. of Defense grant to include military and VA hospitals. This will expand the network significantly. Next up is a partnership endeavor with academia and industry to improve communication and recommendations.

                                On a side note, this effort is similar to what Dr. Young is doing in China.

                                The NACTN is a public health initiative. The program, therefore, deserves involvement from the federal government. That is part of the message to our legislatiors and a big portion of the CDRPA message. The training with the centers is in place, occurring, and could be significantly improved by the passage of the CDRPA.

                                What I am hearing from this Canose is the good news that there is an intellectual infrastructure to bringing SCI research to human clinical trials. We cannot skip the strict FDA regulatory process, but we can and are already making important strides in creating an clinical trial network that will be much better.

                                Kate is back!

                                John

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