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Drug Shows Promise in Spinal Cord Injury Treatment/Cethrin

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  • #16
    Alseres expands Cethrin Phase I/IIa clinical trial

    28th September 2007
    By Staff Writer

    Alseres Pharmaceuticals has reported that an independent data safety monitoring board has unanimously authorized expanding its Phase I/IIa clinical trial in acute spinal cord injury to allow subjects with cervical SCI to be treated with a 9mg dose of Cethrin.

    more:
    http://www.pharmaceutical-business-r...1-B4EF7D86F4CE

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    • #17
      This is only for fresh injuries. How will it help us?
      Last edited by Norm; 09-29-2007, 09:44 PM.
      "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

      -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

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      • #18
        Norm, yes, although it may be applicable in chronics as well.
        ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

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        • #19
          Drug can help patients heal from spinal cord injuries

          Drug can help patients heal from spinal cord injuries
          9/20/2007 3:43 PM
          By: Ivanhoe Broadcast News
          According to the Spinal Cord Injury Information Network, there are about 11,000 new spinal cord injuries each year. Car accidents have been responsible for nearly 50 percent of spinal cord injuries since 2000, and falls have been the second most common cause of spinal cord injuries. Currently, about 253,000 Americans are living with a spinal cord injury.
          Dr. Michael Fehlings from Toronto Western Hospital is studying a new drug to treat spinal cord injuries soon after they happen. The drug, called Cethrin, is applied during surgery to the injury site in a fibrin glue type of material. Cethrin is a recombinant protein that is made through artificial DNA technology. The protein inhibits Rho, a key pathway that triggers cell death and increases damage after a spinal cord injury.
          "You apply [Cethrin] directly to the damaged spinal cord and then the medication penetrates the damaged spinal cord," Fehlings said.
          Cethrin is still under study, but early results look promising. Results from a one-year study of the drug in 37 patients were presented in April, 2007 at the annual meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons in Washington, D.C. All patients in the study had "A" grade injuries, which are the most serious. Injuries are graded from A to E, with A being the most serious and E being the least serious.
          Patients received Cethrin an average of 53 hours after their injury occurred. After six months, 28 percent of patients improved by one or more grades. Five patients improved to a "C" grade, and two improved to a "D" grade.Typically, there is some recovery that occurs after an injury, but the rates of recovery are quite low, in the range of 5 percent to 10 percent.

          http://www.news8austin.com/content/h...192303&SecID=2
          http://stores.ebay.com/MAKSYM-Variety-Store

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Scott Buxton
            I forget which med, but I heard just recently of a med that will help dissolve the glial "scar". Then Lithium will help the stems to proliferate and the Cethrin will keep cells fom dying. Hmmm.
            Dr.Young,

            Is Cethrin still being looked at by the China SCI Network as a possible third part to the UCBC+Lithium combination? Also, in terms of the glial 'scar', in your studies with ucbc, do axons manage to cross the 'scar' without a problem? Thanks in advance.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by zokarkan
              Dr.Young,

              Is Cethrin still being looked at by the China SCI Network as a possible third part to the UCBC+Lithium combination? Also, in terms of the glial 'scar', in your studies with ucbc, do axons manage to cross the 'scar' without a problem? Thanks in advance.
              Zok, yes we continue to be interested in Cethrin. Regarding "glial scars", as you know, I don't like the term "glial scar". Scar to me means a fibrous scar made by fibroblasts. A collection of glial cells is called a gliosis. Some gliosis are associated with chondroitin-6-sulfate proteoglycan, perhaps secreted by macrophages. In such cases, the axons will stop growing. However, in other situations, glia facilitates growth of axons.

              Wise.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Wise Young
                Zok, yes we continue to be interested in Cethrin. Regarding "glial scars", as you know, I don't like the term "glial scar". Scar to me means a fibrous scar made by fibroblasts. A collection of glial cells is called a gliosis. Some gliosis are associated with chondroitin-6-sulfate proteoglycan, perhaps secreted by macrophages. In such cases, the axons will stop growing. However, in other situations, glia facilitates growth of axons.

                Wise.
                Dr.Young,

                I was just wondering, as I remember reading your post once before with you stating that you think that you should first bridge the gap and get the axons to sprout out using the ucbc+lithium combo and the add an inhibitor after a while, if you give Cethrin to people that will be involved in the phase 3 trial of the combo after say about a year of their transplant if there would be any of those cells left alive for Cethrin to show its full potential, or does it work in another way than that? Thanks

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by zokarkan
                  Dr.Young,

                  I was just wondering, as I remember reading your post once before with you stating that you think that you should first bridge the gap and get the axons to sprout out using the ucbc+lithium combo and the add an inhibitor after a while, if you give Cethrin to people that will be involved in the phase 3 trial of the combo after say about a year of their transplant if there would be any of those cells left alive for Cethrin to show its full potential, or does it work in another way than that? Thanks
                  I don't know the answer to your question. We may have to retransplant if the cells do not survive. The optimal timing of the components of the combination is not known. Wise.

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                  • #24
                    Breakthrough for Spine Injuries

                    Breakthrough for Spine Injuries


                    POSTED: 1:28 pm EDT October 1, 2007
                    UPDATED: 1:33 pm EDT October 1, 2007


                    BACKGROUND: According to the Spinal Cord Injury Information Network, there are about 11,000 new spinal cord injuries each year. Car accidents have been responsible for nearly 50 percent of spinal cord injuries since 2000, and falls have been the second most common cause of spinal cord injuries. Currently, about 253,000 Americans are living with a spinal cord injury.

                    A PROMISING NEW DRUG: Michael Fehlings, M.D., Ph.D., from Toronto Western Hospital is studying a new drug to treat spinal cord injuries soon after they happen. The drug, called Cethrin, is applied during surgery to the injury site in a fibrin glue type of material. Cethrin is a recombinant protein that is made through artificial DNA technology. The protein inhibits Rho -- a key pathway that triggers cell death and increases damage after a spinal cord injury. Dr. Fehlings says, "You apply [Cethrin] directly to the damaged spinal cord ... and then the medication penetrates the damaged spinal cord."

                    CHANGING LIVES: Cethrin is still under study, but early results look promising. Results from a one-year study of the drug in 37 patients were presented in April, 2007 at the annual meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons in Washington, D.C. All patients in the study had "A" grade injuries, which are the most serious. Injuries are graded from A to E, with A being the most serious and E being the least serious. Patients received Cethrin an average of 53 hours after their injury occurred. After six months, 28 percent of patients improved by one or more grades. Five patients improved to a "C" grade, and two improved to a "D" grade. Typically, there is some recovery that occurs after an injury, but the rates of recovery are quite low -- in the range of 5 percent to 10 percent. Dr. Fehlings says, "In this trial, fully a third of patients showed significant recovery, and almost 20 percent of the patients showed a major degree of recovery. In my own clinical experience, this type of recovery is very unusual."


                    http://www.wyff4.com/health/14243904/detail.html
                    http://stores.ebay.com/MAKSYM-Variety-Store

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                    • #25
                      Alseres Pharma announces expansion of the Cethrin acute spinal cord injury phase I/II

                      Alseres Pharma announces expansion of the Cethrin acute spinal cord injury phase I/IIA clinical trial

                      Mon Sep 24, 2007 9:56am EDT
                      Co announces that its independent Data Safety Monitoring Board has unanimously authorized expanding the co's Phase I/IIa clinical trial in acute spinal cord injury to allow subjects with cervical SCI to be treated with a 9 mg dose of Cethrin.
                      http://www.reuters.com/article/inPla...17ALSE20070924
                      http://stores.ebay.com/MAKSYM-Variety-Store

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                      • #26
                        Alseres Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to Present at Windhover's Therapeutic Area Partnerships

                        Alseres Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to Present at Windhover's Therapeutic Area Partnerships Conference
                        October 18, 2007: 10:15 AM EST

                        HOPKINTON, Mass., Oct. 18 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Alseres Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that Dr. Frank Bobe, Executive Vice President and Chief Business Officer of Alseres Pharmaceuticals, Inc., will be presenting at Windhover Information's 2nd Annual Therapeutic Area Partnerships in Philadelphia, PA October 24-26, 2007. Dr. Bobe will be presenting an overview on Alseres Regenerative Therapeutics program. Cethrin(R), the Company's lead regenerative therapeutic for acute spinal cord injury, was named one of the "Top 10 Licensable Neuroscience Projects" by Windhover.

                        http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/...18102007-1.htm
                        http://stores.ebay.com/MAKSYM-Variety-Store

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                        • #27
                          Alseres completes enrollment in Phase I/IIa spinal cord injury trial

                          Alseres completes enrollment in Phase I/IIa spinal cord injury trial Tuesday, January 08, 2008; Posted: 09:32 AM

                          -- Alseres Pharmaceuticals has concluded enrollment in the Phase I/IIa clinical trial of Cethrin in acute spinal cord injury. A total of 48 subjects have been enrolled at 9 sites in the US and Canada.
                          The subjects in the Cethrin Phase I/IIa trial suffered a complete thoracic or cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and were thus classified as an A on the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale at the time of enrollment in the trial. The six month interim data on 37 of these subjects treated with doses of up to 6mg indicate that 27% of the Cethrin treated subjects improved from ASIA A to ASIA B or better. When subjects with cervical injuries who were treated with Cethrin were analyzed separately, about 46% of the subjects exhibited a conversion rate from ASIA A to ASIA B or better. Moreover,



                          http://www.tradingmarkets.com/.site/...20News/967087/
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                          • #28
                            Yay for Alseres!

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                            • #29
                              Great news.

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                              • #30
                                Wow. I think this is the first time I have actually heard of a successful clinical trial with tangible results (if they are truly accurate). Cool, SCI history in the making!
                                No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

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