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Dr Martin Schwab - Switzerland.

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  • #31
    Thanks Wilfried for the info, I find your posts uplifting for the future. Any idea where to find translated copies for "Regeneration" publication.

    Thanks, Jeremy
    "I QUESS THEY'LL HAVE TO RUN OUT OF RATS, BEFORE THEY TRY IT OUT IN HUMANS. WAKE ME UP WHEN IT'S OVER !!!"

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    • #32
      wilfried,

      Your updates are very much appreciated.

      Comment


      • #33
        [such as ATI355 & Chondroitinase, which was obviously tested in animal experiments by Dr. Schwab.]

        That`s right Wilfried, in June 2005 Dr. Schwab exlained on startrampe.net, that they are testing a combination of anti nogo & Chondroitinase on rats

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Chester80
          [such as ATI355 & Chondroitinase, which was obviously tested in animal experiments by Dr. Schwab.]

          That`s right Wilfried, in June 2005 Dr. Schwab exlained on startrampe.net, that they are testing a combination of anti nogo & Chondroitinase on rats
          Finally.

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          • #35
            Did Phase 1 begin???
            "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

            -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Chester80
              [such as ATI355 & Chondroitinase, which was obviously tested in animal experiments by Dr. Schwab.]

              That`s right Wilfried, in June 2005 Dr. Schwab exlained on startrampe.net, that they are testing a combination of anti nogo & Chondroitinase on rats
              Rats my friends RATS.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by KIM
                Rats my friends RATS.
                I knew that. Thanx.

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                • #38
                  And this was two years ago.

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                  • #39
                    I telephoned Prof Schwab, it said to me that phase II on the acute lesions will start. He also said to me that they tested their drug on chronic rats and that there were much less results, but when they combine with other molecules it went much better. In light, he said to me that to have good performances on the chronic lesions, one needs combinations of molecules.

                    french version

                    I telephoned Prof Schwab, it said to me that phase II on the acute lesions will start. He also said to me that they tested their drug on chronic rats and that there were much less results, but when they combine with other molecules it went much better. In light, he said to me that to have good performances on the chronic lesions, one needs combinations of molecules.


                    it my also to send an email

                    Merci de votre email. A propos des thérapies de combinaison, Martin Schwab voulait souligner que chez le patient chronique le tissu cicatriciel empêche la croissance des fibres nerveuses (le tissu cicatriciel agit comme une barrière). Donc, des nouvelles thérapeutiques doivent être (et sont actuellement) développées pour remplacer le tissu cicatriciel ou le rendre plus permissif. Actuellement, aucune de ces approches n'est prête pour s'appliquer dans des essais cliniques. Nous sommes en contact étroit avec d’autres équipes travaillant dans le domaine et il y a un grand intérêt - du côté des patients et du côté des chercheurs - de trouver une bonne solution à ce problème.


                    ===========================
                    TEXTE ORIGINAL EN ANGLAIS
                    ===========================


                    Dear Mr Guerdener

                    Thank you for your email. With combination therapies Martin Schwab was pointing at the fact that the in the chronic patient the scar tissue inhibits outgrowing nerve fibers from crossing (scar tissue acts as a barrier). So new therapeutics have to be (and are being) developed to either replace the scar tissue or to make it more permissible. Currently, none of these approaches are ready to apply in clinical trials. We are in close contact with groups working in the field and there is certain a big interest – from the patient side and the researcher’s side – to find a good solution to this problem.

                    Kind regards,

                    Anita Buchli

                    Anita Buchli, PhD
                    Scientific Coordinator
                    Brain Research Institute
                    University of Zurich
                    Winterthurerstrasse 190
                    CH-8057 Zurich
                    Switzerland

                    phone +41 44 635 32 66
                    fax +41 44 635 33 03
                    email buchli@hifo.uzh.ch

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                    • #40
                      Thank you for the update FTI.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Schmeky
                        There will first have to be something to make the scar penetrable, which doesn't exist yet. Chondriotinase hasn't gotten off the ground yet.
                        I remember hearing about Chondoritinase what feels like a long time ago now but I have not heard any thing since about 2002 when I remember reading that in rat experiments it had demonstrated its potential as part of a tool-kit needed to tackle SCI. Since then I have heard nothing about it other than that clinical trials in which chondroitinase was part of an eye experiment had benn abandoned:
                        Human trials with chondroitinase were curtailed without data being released. Studies were presented that showed an effective liquefaction and posterior vitreous separation in cadaver eyes, which had chondroitinase injected into the mid vitreous cavity.
                        http://www.nature.com/eye/journal/v1.../6700193a.html
                        I have e-mailed Kings College London to ask about progress relating to SCI but have heard nothing back yet. Does anyone else know of any news on this enzme?

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                        • #42
                          Ask Dr. Fawcett

                          The Swiss IFP institution which has founded Schwab's research from the very beginning, has as well heavily spent money for Dr. Fawcett's work ( http://www.brc.cam.ac.uk/JamesFawcett.htm )
                          on neutralizing the inhibitory effect of glial scars on axon regeneration: http://www.brc.cam.ac.uk/Axonregeneration.htm

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                          • #43
                            Wilfried,

                            Great links, thank you. Very interesting reading.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Acorda Therapeutics licensed chondroitinase from Dr. Fawcett and his group. The one company (Seikagaku in Japan) that made clinical grade chondroitinase apparently has stopped doing so. Many papers have been published showing that chondroitinase stimulates sprouting and enhances plasticity in the central nervous system. Acorda is trying to raise the funds to develop chondroinase.

                              Martin Schwab's anti-nogo antibody should be finishing its trial in Switzerland and Germany. They have been doing the trial for two years and I am anticipating that they will have some results soon. The trial is sponsored by Novartis. I have heard that the trial is going well and that there may be positive results.

                              In the meantime, Cethrin was licensed from Bioaxone by Boston Life Science who changed their name to Alseres which reorganized itself to pursue Cethrin as its lead product. It is going into phase 2 trial and hopefully into phase 3 trial. I am excited about this treatment and think that it is very promising.

                              Wise.

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                              • #45
                                Dr. Young

                                According to the information I collected, phase I of the anti-nogo antibody study was performed on 17 candidates and it lasted for one and a half years. Results were beyond expectation - zero side-effects as already seen in the animal experiments.

                                Prof. Schwab said already more than a month ago that they are about to start with phase II which will be carried out on 100-200 patients in Europe and North America.
                                So I wouldn't be surprised if they are already ramping up the dosage on the first patient in Zurich.

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