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Layton teacher heads to China for new umbilical cord stem cell transplant

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  • Layton teacher heads to China for new umbilical cord stem cell transplant

    Hope, a dream and pressing on
    Published 01/16/2007 | Stem Cells , January 2007 | Unrated

    By Bryon Saxton
    Standard-Examiner Davis Bureau

    Layton teacher heads to China for new umbilical cord stem cell transplant



    LAYTON -- Kirk Green makes his way through the halls of E.G. King Elementary School in Layton, pushing with leather-gloved hands the large wheels that make his wheelchair move forward.

    Many of the children he passes greet him with a large smile and a shout of "Hola" as their Spanish teacher rolls by.


    The 23-year-old Green remains hopeful one day he will be able to walk down the halls of the school.


    The former west Layton farm boy, who once loved to get his hands dirty, is pinning some of that hope on a trip to China. Green, his newlywed wife, Jessi, father, Jon, and grandfather Kelly Green, are traveling thousands of miles for a chance at his recovery.


    Green, a quadriplegic, will undergo a stem cell transplant, the cells surgically inserted into his spinal cord.


    On Dec. 18, 2004, Green broke two Vertebrae in his neck in a snowmobile accident in the Kamas woodlands.


    Green said he came off a jump awkwardly, tumbling head first over the front of his snowmobile. The machine landed on top of him, breaking the vertebrae and paralyzing him from the chest down.


    Three months later, Green was released from the University of Utah Medical Center and LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City, hoping that through Physical Therapy and faith he could regain feeling in his arms, legs and the trunk of his body.


    "Life just can't stop and end, you have got to press on," said Green, who was injured five months after returning from a mission in Mexico for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.


    After much study and talking to a Florida man who treated his paralysis with a similar stem cell transplant, Green opted to travel halfway around the world in search of a miracle cure.

    more:

    http://www.thescizone.com/news/artic...sing-on/1.html

  • #2
    Originally posted by manouli
    Green opted to travel halfway around the world in search of a miracle cure.
    A miracle cure currently does not exist. It is sad to see people treating their desires and hopes. This may ultimately lead to severe depression and exclusion from future clinical trials.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Schmeky
      A miracle cure currently does not exist. It is sad to see people treating their desires and hopes. This may ultimately lead to severe depression and exclusion from future clinical trials.
      I think that's how we think when we just become disable, in our mind it's impossible to believe that we can be paralyzed for the rest of our lives, and we look to see if we can cure ourselves some how. When I was hurt, 25 years ago, there wasn't any place that they could offer any therapy for recovery, they didn't even mention the word cure, it was a prohibit word. For many of us who are for many years like this we think in a different way.
      Schmeky, they've got to find the cure, I wish our goverment supported spinal cord injury it would have been much easier for doctors to solve the problem.
      Last edited by manouli; 01-19-2007, 12:22 AM.

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