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    Rerouting Nerves May Aid Bladder Control

    Surgery seen to aid bladder control

    Published Yesterday | December 2006 , Quality of life | Unrated

    By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer
    WASHINGTON - Needing a wheelchair isn't always the biggest complaint of people left paralyzed by spinal cord injury — it's also the loss of bladder control. On Monday, Michigan doctors began a unique experiment to see if rerouting patients' nerves just might fix that problem.

    It's a delicate operation: Surgeons cut open a spot on the spine and sew two normally unrelated nerves together — one from the bladder to one from the thigh — with a single hair-thin stitch. It will take months for this new nerve bridge to heal, an anxious waiting period for the first volunteers.

    But if it works, merely scratching the thigh should signal the bladder to empty, allowing patients to ditch their despised catheters and restore a longed-for degree of freedom, as well as fewer bladder infections and other serious complications.

    "I've got nothing to lose by doing this," is the way a cautiously hopeful Kevin Bryant, 19 and paralyzed from the waist down by a car crash, approached the experiment.

    It's a technique pioneered in China that is starting to garner international attention — and surgeons at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., hope their new U.S. study will prove if the approach really is a solution for at least some patients.



    more:

    http://www.thescizone.com/news/artic...control/1.html

    #2
    Rerouting Nerves May Aid Bladder Control

    Not quite a cure but I am all for this treatment! (although at $30,000 it does seem really expensive)

    http://www.todaysthv.com/news/news.aspx?storyid=38833

    Needing a wheelchair isn't always the biggest complaint of people left paralyzed by spinal cord injury, it's also the loss of bladder control. On Monday, Michigan doctors began a unique experiment to see if rerouting patients' nerves just might fix that problem.

    It's a delicate operation: Surgeons cut open a spot on the spine and sew two normally unrelated nerves together, one from the bladder to one from the thigh, with a single hair-thin stitch. It will take months for this new nerve bridge to heal, an anxious waiting period for the first volunteers.

    But if it works, merely scratching the thigh should signal the bladder to empty, allowing patients to ditch their despised catheters and restore a longed-for degree of freedom, as well as fewer bladder infections and other serious complications.

    "I've got nothing to lose by doing this," is the way a cautiously hopeful Kevin Bryant, 19 and paralyzed from the waist down by a car crash, approached the experiment.

    It's a technique pioneered in China that is starting to garner international attention, and surgeons at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., hope their new U.S. study will prove if the approach really is a solution for at least some patients.

    "We're very excited," says Dr. Kenneth Peters, Beaumont's urology research chief, who headed a team of doctors that traveled to China last February to watch Dr. Chuan-Gao Xiao operate at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology.

    "We said, 'This is something we need to study ... to see if we can reproduce this in the U.S.,'" adds Peters, who in turn invited Xiao into Beaumont's operating room Monday. If the results hold up, "it would allow us to treat those patients who have no other alternatives."
    Last edited by carbar; 19 Dec 2006, 11:54 AM.

    Comment


      #3
      That's my boy!
      His surgery will be on Thursday. His will be a little different than originally planned. They will be rerouting a nerve from above his injury level, due significant perifrieal (sorry, this is spelled wrong and I don't have time to check) nerver damage from the accident. It will, as a result, most likely take longer to heal (18 vs. 9 months), but will provide actual sensory control. They will also decompress his spinal cord and remove any scar tissue.
      BeeBee

      Comment


        #4
        Keep us posted BeeBee, and all the best to your son.

        Comment


          #5
          good luck to your son beebee.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by BeeBee
            That's my boy!
            His surgery will be on Thursday. His will be a little different than originally planned. They will be rerouting a nerve from above his injury level, due significant perifrieal (sorry, this is spelled wrong and I don't have time to check) nerver damage from the accident. It will, as a result, most likely take longer to heal (18 vs. 9 months), but will provide actual sensory control. They will also decompress his spinal cord and remove any scar tissue.
            BeeBee, thank you for posting the information. I spent several days with Dr. Chuan-Gao Xiao at the Fifth Asia-Pacific Neural Regeneration Symposium where he presented his latest results. He has now done several hundred patients, including children with spina bifida and people with chronic spinal cord injury. The patients that he did at NYU were in a clinical trial funded by NIH. About 80% of the people are able to urinate by stimulating the skin of the spinal cord segment whose ventral root has been re-routed to the nerves to the bladder. I am quite impressed by the procedure. Apparently, he will soon be publishing some additional changes in the procedure that improves the reliability of the method. Interestingly, he says that some patients also have improvement of their anal sphincter. However, there is not much information about sexual function. The most impressive cases were the children with spina bifida where they apparently not only recover bladder function but often regain voluntary control of their bladder.

            Wise.

            Comment


              #7
              BeeBee, I wish Kevin and your family the best.
              wildwilly
              “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

              Comment


                #8
                Detour nerves to control bladder

                http://www.mlive.com/news/fljournal/...770.xml&coll=5
                sigpic

                Stay safe my son. See you around thanksgiving!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Kevin's surgery is this morning around 11 am (eastern). Can I ask for crossed fingers?
                  He will have a more extensive procedure than previously planned and as reported. His reroute will be from ABOVE the level of injury to the bladder. In addition, he will be further decompressed and scar tissue removed. Could end up as the best Christmas present ever.
                  BeeBee

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Many Hugs to Kevin I will be praying for him What a great christmas present....
                    Be always determined in Life and Love

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by BeeBee
                      Kevin's surgery is this morning around 11 am (eastern). Can I ask for crossed fingers?
                      He will have a more extensive procedure than previously planned and as reported. His reroute will be from ABOVE the level of injury to the bladder. In addition, he will be further decompressed and scar tissue removed. Could end up as the best Christmas present ever.

                      Go get it Kevin! I am smelling big success! XXOOXXOO TO U.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        http://www.beaumont.edu/pls/portal30...w?xstoryid=616

                        A little info on the person with the check book. J. Peter Minestrelli is funding these procedures.

                        Thanks, Anty
                        BeeBee

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Wise Young
                          BeeBee, thank you for posting the information. I spent several days with Dr. Chuan-Gao Xiao at the Fifth Asia-Pacific Neural Regeneration Symposium where he presented his latest results. He has now done several hundred patients, including children with spina bifida and people with chronic spinal cord injury. The patients that he did at NYU were in a clinical trial funded by NIH. About 80% of the people are able to urinate by stimulating the skin of the spinal cord segment whose ventral root has been re-routed to the nerves to the bladder. I am quite impressed by the procedure. Apparently, he will soon be publishing some additional changes in the procedure that improves the reliability of the method. Interestingly, he says that some patients also have improvement of their anal sphincter. However, there is not much information about sexual function. The most impressive cases were the children with spina bifida where they apparently not only recover bladder function but often regain voluntary control of their bladder.

                          Wise.
                          Wise what was the median age of the kids with SB that he was doing this on?

                          Is there a cut off age/# of years post?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Canuck: I know he's done children as young as 6-ish and another recent surgery this Monday (12-18) on a 49 yr old man injured in 1979 (follow Robynbird's link for this info).
                            BeeBee

                            Comment


                              #15
                              He's finally out of surgery. It took almost 5 hours. They rerouted the nerve, removed additional bone fracments, decompressed the spine, and removed scar tissue. Given the extreme damage to his cord, they now say 60% chance of this working . We'll see.....
                              BeeBee

                              Comment

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