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    #31
    Originally posted by carbar
    Is this what you are referring to?
    "The research teams at BCM and the University of Rochester Medical Center took embryonic glial precursor cells and, in the laboratory, induced them to differentiate into a specific type of embryonic astrocyte that is highly supportive of nerve fiber growth. The scientists transplanted these cells into cuts in the spinal cord of adult rats and measured the growth of nerve fibers.
    They then compared healing and recovery in these rats with the recovery in spinal cord injured rats that received either undifferentiated glial precursor cells or no treatment at all.
    The transplants of the precursor-derived astrocytes promoted rapid growth of 40 percent of sensory nerve fibers across the cuts and also suppressed the formation of scar tissue."

    taken from
    http://www.bcm.edu/fromthelab/vol05/is4/06may_n1.html

    Barbara,

    Yes, but my research paper was generated at Baylor in Houston, Texas, and their results were 60%, as stated in the paper, dated March 2006.

    I think your reference is at a collaborating lab. They are constantly improving the results. I suspect a paper may be coming where they combined Decorin with GDAs, if so, this could knock our socks off.

    This is only speculation on my part, but it is logical to combine the two.

    Comment


      #32
      My feet are ready and waiting to have their socks knocked off!! Take 'em away!

      Comment


        #33
        Originally posted by Schmeky
        I suspect a paper may be coming where they combined Decorin with GDAs, if so, this could knock our socks off.
        So we have to stand barefoot in the bar now? Thanks Schmeky for your trip and report.

        Comment


          #34
          schmeky,
          hi, how are you? I have a question. is dr. davies planning to do the combination of the cell and decorin transplant on cats and / or dogs that already have sci (complete chronic sci due to accident or injury) any time soon ? or will he wait until he sees the results of the rats first before he goes to cats or dogs ?
          thanks

          Comment


            #35
            Originally posted by Schmeky
            Seneca,

            The BBB scale is no longer used. It has been replaced by a walking grid, which provides a more accurate measurement. The grid walk is a sensitive measurement of the ability of the rats to step rhythmically and to coordinate accurate placement of both fore and hind limbs. The score is based on the number of missed steps in 3 series of "runs".

            Normal, uninjured rats missed a total of 2 steps. In the case of the 26 rats studied in the acute setting after being injured and then treated with GDAs, after 28 days they missed 2.5 steps, essentially being "normal". Incidentally, all 26 rats scored the same 2.5, or 100%.

            This is incredible documented recovery.
            Wow, that is huge. Thanks Schmeky!

            Comment


              #36
              Originally posted by kz
              schmeky,
              hi, how are you? I have a question. is dr. davies planning to do the combination of the cell and decorin transplant on cats and / or dogs that already have sci (complete chronic sci due to accident or injury) any time soon ? or will he wait until he sees the results of the rats first before he goes to cats or dogs ?
              thanks
              kz,

              I have no idea if Davies is even planning to do a combination Decorin/cell transplanation. He did mention carrying out further studies on naturally SCI injured dogs and perhaps pigs.

              The combination of Decorin and GDA's is purely speculation on my part.

              Comment


                #37
                Hey Schmeky,

                A big thank you, I've just seen small labs, this must have been amazing and from your report it was.

                rock on
                http://justadollarplease.org/

                2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member

                "You kids and your cures, why back when I was injured they gave us a wheelchair and that's the way it was and we liked it!" Grumpy Old Man

                .."i used to be able to goof around so much because i knew Superman had my back. now all i've got is his example -- and that's gonna have to be enough."

                Comment


                  #38
                  Originally posted by Schmeky
                  kz,

                  I have no idea if Davies is even planning to do a combination Decorin/cell transplanation. He did mention carrying out further studies on naturally SCI injured dogs and perhaps pigs.

                  The combination of Decorin and GDA's is purely speculation on my part.
                  Dogs did somebody say DOGS?
                  Oh we have dogs for you Dr. Davies. Mostly SCI due to IVDD. And mostly dachshund..but we got DOGS.
                  Life isn't about getting thru the storm but learning to dance in the rain.

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Decorin and type-1 GDAs

                    Originally posted by Schmeky
                    carbar,

                    Decorin is a trade name for a substance that is naturally occurring in the body. It is being manufactured for lab use and in the future can be scaled up for large scale distribution. As I understand, it will be generic, i.e., one size fits all.

                    Yes, Jeannette Davies is Stephens wife. She is a neuroscientist as well. Very pretty too.
                    Hi David and all,
                    Actually Decorin is the scientific name for the molecule and it does not yet have a trade name. I am working closely with a couple of biotech companies who have already cracked the problem of making large quantities of pharmaceutical grade human decorin.

                    Yes Jeannette is my wife and colleague, though we were married before we decided to work together. Her expertise is in development of glial support cells which fits very well with our program to generate the right kind of spinal cord support cells (such as type-1 astrocytes) from stem cell-like precursor cells to repair adult spinal cord injuries.

                    Please note that our work with type-1 astrocytes derived from glial restricted precursors (Glial restricted precursor Derived Astrocytes or GDAs) is designed to promote nerve fiber regeneration and new connections in the injured spinal cord and is therefore not the same as Hans Keirsteads approach which is designed to re-myelinate (re-ensheath) nerve fibers that were spared after the original injury. We are attempting to bridge the actual injury site rather than trying to re-myelinate spared nerve fibers next to or away from the injury site.

                    Please Note: In both instances scar tissue presents a potential obstacle to the integration of either transplanted cells to "bridge" the growth of nerve fibers across the injury site or, transplanted cells designed to re-myelinate (re-ensheath) spared nerve fibers next to the injury site (such as those used by Hans Keirstead).

                    My lab has shown however that type-1 GDAs themselves have the ability to transiently suppress scar formation when transplanted into acute spinal cord injuries. We think this ability to transiently suppress scar formation in part supported the rapid growth of 40% of sensory axons across the injury site. However we have also shown that decorin can suppress scar formation for an even longer period of time (the study that won the Erica Nader award) and we are therefore now testing whether a combination treatment of GDAs and decorin can further increase the efficiency of nerve fiber regeneration across acute injujuries.

                    Chronic Injuries
                    However as I have already mentioned we are also currently investigating whether Decorin can promote the breakdown or "degradation" of chronic scar tissue. We have recently shown that decorin can induce the spinal cord to make an enzyme called Plasmin which other labs have shown can breakdown molecules found in scar tissue that are known to inhibit growth of nerve fibers. The ability to modify or breakdown chronic scar tissue in a controlled manner that does not create an even bigger injury, should allow better integration of transplanted cells within or adjacent to sites of injury, and therefore hopefully increase recovery of spinal cord function.

                    Transplantation of GDAs alone to chronic injuries may promote recovery of function (next round of studies) however to my mind all transplanted cells be they GDAs, OECs, Bone Marrow cells or oligodendrocyte precursors will be far more effecient at promoting recovery if they do not find themselves within or next to dense, fibrotic scar tissue.

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by Schmeky
                      Barbara,

                      Yes, but my research paper was generated at Baylor in Houston, Texas, and their results were 60%, as stated in the paper, dated March 2006.

                      I think your reference is at a collaborating lab. They are constantly improving the results. I suspect a paper may be coming where they combined Decorin with GDAs, if so, this could knock our socks off.

                      This is only speculation on my part, but it is logical to combine the two.
                      Hi David,
                      Percents of axon growth
                      Please note that our study showed that over 60% of sensory axons responded to the transplanted GDAs and grew into the center of the injury site and that over 60% of these axons were then able to leave the injury site and re-enter the spinal cord beyond the injury site. Several labs have shown that nerve fibers or "axons" can enter grafts placed within injury sites but very few if any of these axons can re-enter spinal cord beyond. That is why we stressed the percents of axons making it into the injury site and how many were then able to keep going and leave the other side of the injury. We make it clear in the paper that the overall efficiency of sensory axon growth completely across the injury was therefore 40% (in just 8 days).


                      Stephen.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Originally posted by kz
                        schmeky,
                        hi, how are you? I have a question. is dr. davies planning to do the combination of the cell and decorin transplant on cats and / or dogs that already have sci (complete chronic sci due to accident or injury) any time soon ? or will he wait until he sees the results of the rats first before he goes to cats or dogs ?
                        thanks
                        At present we are planning to wait until we have seen significant results in rats before we test any potential therapies in larger animals. As Schmeky mentioned I would like to if possible set up SCI studies in dogs that are the victims of naturally occuring accidents. To my mind testing potential therapies in large mammals that have not first shown ROBUST results in rats, is very poor science. Without robust results in rats these experiments would be more about PR and soaking up funding resources and than actually adding significantly to our scientific knowledge of treating SCI.

                        Comment


                          #42
                          Supporting our SCI research

                          Hi everyone,
                          I have received several enquiries as to how to make donations to our SCI research program at Baylor.

                          Here below are three different ways to make a donation. Unfortunately we have been informed by Baylor that they are unable to set up a PayPal account.

                          Many thanks to all those that support our work.


                          Dr. Stephen Davies, Ph.D.
                          Spinal Cord Injury Research Program
                          Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine


                          Donating by Telephone – Credit Card

                          Call Debby Chambers at US 713 798-1216

                          Online Donations - Credit Card

                          Go to the main Baylor College of Medicine website – www.bcm.edu
                          Select “Giving” from the top menu
                          Select “Giving to BCM” from the menu on left side of page
                          Select “Online Giving”
                          Select “online form”
                          Complete page 1 of form and select “Continue”
                          Complete page 2 of form – in designation drop down box, select “Spinal Cord Injury Research – Dr. Stephen Davies”
                          Proceed to verification


                          Sending donations by Mail - Credit Card or Check

                          Print the attached form if applicable or print the form on the web site, and specify that your gift should be designated to support:
                          Dr. Stephen Davies Spinal Cord Research Program
                          Davies Research Account 2330029201
                          Mail the completed form to:
                          Debby Chambers, MBA
                          Administrator
                          Department of Neurosurgery
                          Baylor College of Medicine
                          1701 Dryden Road, Suite 750
                          Houston, TX 77004-3411


                          Comment


                            #43
                            I sent my measely donation. I wish I could do more ... thank you Dr Davies. This information makes me really excited for those who haven't been injured that long (I put that at around 5yrs for some reason, lol).
                            Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                            T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                            Comment


                              #44
                              Originally posted by lynnifer
                              I sent my measely donation. I wish I could do more ... thank you Dr Davies. This information makes me really excited for those who haven't been injured that long (I put that at around 5yrs for some reason, lol).
                              Hi Lynnifer. As I think you are the first person so far on the CareCure forum to give your financial support to our SCI research you get an extra special thankyou from me and my research team.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Thank you Dr. Davies

                                Comment

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