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    Stem Cell Pills

    My trainer introduced me to this. One of his friends is part of the company and he wasn't too sure about how it works. I suggested that I would post it and let the carecure be the judge. If Dr. Young says it's ok than I would be willing to try it for all of us.


    StemTech HealthSciences



    The Story of StemTech


    StemTech HealthSciences was founded in 2005 in order to bring a new breakthrough product technology to the marketplace. The beginnings of this natural, phytoceutical dietary supplement started as a conceptual theory in the mind of a research scientist at the turn of the century.

    Prior to theory development, this scientist, Christian Drapeau, accumulated many years of experience observing the apparent health benefits derived from a remarkable fresh water plant. These beneficial results intrigued this young neurophysiologist, and he began intensive research to examine this phenomenon.
    Initial results of this research lead him and his colleague, Dr. Gitte Jensen, to hypothesize what appeared to be a very intriguing theory involving adult stem cells, and how isolated extracts of this aqua-botanical, seemed to work to optimize the natural behavior of stem cells in the body.
    In 2000, the two scientists shared their views with Howard Newman, the owner of Desert Lake Technologies (DLT). DLT is a company with vast experience in aquaculture and harvesting of this aqua-botanical raw material. Together, this team ventured forward with the vision, skill and courage required to undertake a radical, new way of thinking about how the body keeps itself healthy. Using science to unlock the secrets in nature, the theory began to take on a life of its own.
    In 2002, the theory was published in a medical journal named Medical Hypotheses, while other scientists from around the world also continued to publish research that further strengthened what Drapeau and Jensen believed they had discovered.
    In 2004, a U.S. patent was awarded to these inventors, and further internal and external studies continued to corroborate their position. Desert Lake Technologies was now ready to transition from research & development, and bring the concept and the product to market in 2005.
    The company then turned to a top industry professional, an MBA with a 17 year track record of success, to help guide them in the strategic planning process. After many months of analysis, Ray Carter recommended, and the team decided to form StemTech HealthSciences, in order to launch the product through the power of the network marketing industry. Mr. Carter accepted the company’s request for him to organize and run the new company, as they targeted a market pre-launch in the fall of 2005.
    The name of this product is StemEnhanceTM, and it is a breakthrough, natural botanical extract that supports wellness, by helping your body maintain healthy stem cell physiology. It is the very first product on the market from the latest phytoceutical product category called “stem cell enhancers”.
    When you take two capsules of StemEnhance, the ingredients help to support the release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. Through a natural process, those stem cells then travel to areas of the body where they are most needed.
    Recognizing that the novelty of this breakthrough product will require a great deal of consumer education, StemTech has put together a media campaign strategy in order to educate and create the awareness we desire, to give StemEnhance the brand name recognition that will assist all of our independent distributors to more successfully market the product, while generating countless leads.
    StemEnhance is only available through StemTech HealthSciences, Inc. and its independent distributors. The formulation is patented and is the first of its kind on the market. So whether you are a “baby boomer”, athlete, or anyone else looking to optimize health, StemEnhance is for you. Look for StemEnhance to be available in the marketplace November of 2005.
    Birds Fly in Flocks, but Eagles Fly Alone...

    #2
    [QUOTE=spidergirl]My trainer introduced me to this. One of his friends is part of the company and he wasn't too sure about how it works. I suggested that I would post it and let the carecure be the judge. If Dr. Young says it's ok than I would be willing to try it for all of us.

    Cheryl,

    I am sorry but this sounds like commercial hype. I did a search for Jensen and Drapeau and found the abstracts listed below. The hypothesis that natural compounds stimulate stem cells is not novel and has been proposed by many people. None of the papers provide any evidence that the material that they are selling do anything to stimulate stem cells.

    Their website http://www.stemtech-team.com/ claims that the product StemEnhance contains the ligand L-selectin and polysaccharide-rich migratose. L-selectin may play a role in vascular homing of peripheral blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (Biancone, et al., 2004) and two potential hematopoietic stem cell marker CD-44 (Sackstein, 2004) and CD-34 strongly bind L-selectin (Joseph, et al., 2003). L-selectin is an useful marker for separating lymphoid progenitors (Perry, et al., 2004) and bind onto other ligands such as VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and VAP-1 on progenitor cells (Lepique, et al., 2003). However, I was unable to find out any information about migratose and its effects on stem cells recruitment or migration.

    These are interesting molecules but I did not find any evidence that they would do anything to stimulate stem cells growth, release, or migration.

    Wise.
    • Jensen GS and Drapeau C (2002). The use of in situ bone marrow stem cells for the treatment of various degenerative diseases. Med Hypotheses 59: 422-8. The potential for tissue repair and regeneration is encouraging in the light of novel research on the plasticity of adult stem cells. Intense research efforts over the last 3 years have provided solid evidence for the continuous generation of many types of tissue cells from adult stem cells as a normal part of our physiology throughout development and adult life in mammals, including humans. This opens new therapeutic avenues for many clinical problems and provides alternative opportunities at a time when much attention has been brought to the issue of using embryonic stem cells for research purposes and for the development of treatments for various diseases. Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells characterized by nearly unlimited self-renewal and differentiation capacity. However, evidence has accumulated over the past few years, indicating that adult bone marrow stem cells might have pluripotent properties similar to those of embryonic stem cells. Based on a review of the literature we propose the hypothesis that in situ mobilization of stem cells from the bone marrow and their migration to various tissues is a normal physiological process of regeneration and repair and that therapeutic benefits can be generated with less invasive regimens than the removal and re-injection of stem cells, through the stimulation of normal stem cell migration. We further propose that effort should be made to identify natural compounds characterized by their ability to augment this normal process of mobilization and re-colonization of bone marrow stem cells for the potential treatment of various degenerative diseases. Holger NIS Inc., Port Dover, Ontario, Canada. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=12208182
    • Drapeau J, El-Helou V, Clement R, Bel-Hadj S, Gosselin H, Trudeau LE, Villeneuve L and Calderone A (2005). Nestin-expressing neural stem cells identified in the scar following myocardial infarction. J Cell Physiol 204: 51-62. Nerve fiber innervation of the scar following myocardial damage may have occurred either via the growth of pre-existing fibers and/or the mobilization of neural stem cells. The present study examined whether neural stem cells were recruited to the infarct region of the rat heart following coronary artery ligation. The neural stem cell marker nestin was detected in the infarct region of 1-week post-myocardial infarct (MI) male rats and cultured scar-derived neural-like cells. By contrast, nestin staining was undetected in either scar myofibroblasts or cardiac myocytes residing in the non-infarcted left ventricle. Reactive astrocytes were isolated from the infarct region and characterized by the co-expression of nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and vimentin. Specific staining of oligodendrocytes and neurons was also detected in the infarct region and cultured scar-derived neural-like cells. Furthermore, neurofilament-M positive fibers were identified in the scar and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was observed in peripherin-positive neurons. Neurite formation was induced in PC12 cells treated with the conditioned-media of primary passage scar-derived cells, highlighting the synthesis and secretion of neurotrophic factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were detected in myofibroblasts and neural cells, and both cell types expressed the NGF receptors trkA and p75. These data highlight the novel observation that neural stem cells were recruited to the infarct region of the damaged rat heart and may contribute in part to nerve fiber growth and subsequent innervation of the scar. Department of Physiology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15605421
    • De Kok IJ, Drapeau SJ, Young R and Cooper LF (2005). Evaluation of mesenchymal stem cells following implantation in alveolar sockets: a canine safety study. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 20: 511-8. PURPOSE: The overall goal of this project was to evaluate culture-expanded bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for alveolar bone repair in terms of safety and potential efficacy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MSCs isolated from bone marrow aspirations were culture-expanded and cryopreserved. Thawed cells were incubated with 3.2 x 5-mm hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) cylinders in a closed system containing 5 x 10(7) cells/mL. Cells alone, cell-free constructs, or cell-loaded constructs were rinsed in saline and implanted in extraction sockets in the mandibular second and fourth premolar sites of 14 beagle dogs. Acute reactions were evaluated histologically after 7 or 21 days, and bone formation was examined after 49 days. RESULTS: Neither implanted MSC-related inflammation nor ectopic osteogenesis was observed. At 7 and 21 days, dil-labeled canine MSCs were found in more than 80% of the implant sites. Few canine MSCs were found in neighboring tissue. Mild inflammation present at 7 days diminished by 21 days. After 49 days, measured bone formation was 34%, 25%, and 35% for cell-loaded, cell-free, and untreated sockets, respectively (P < .05). At 21 days, bone formation was evident in all sites. Wound dehiscence was a complication associated with cell exclusionary membranes and resulted in local inflammation. DISCUSSION: The extraction model indicates the safety of MSCs implanted adherent to HA/TCP. Local bone repair occurred in the absence of nonspecific differentiation or migration with distant osteogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: An alveolar socket model may be an appropriate model for initial clinical investigation of MSC-mediated bone repair. Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=16161734
    • El-Helou V, Dupuis J, Proulx C, Drapeau J, Clement R, Gosselin H, Villeneuve L, Manganas L and Calderone A (2005). Resident nestin+ neural-like cells and fibers are detected in normal and damaged rat myocardium. Hypertension 46: 1219-25. The present study examined whether nestin+ neural-like stem cells detected in the scar tissue of rats 1 week after myocardial infarction (MI) were derived from bone marrow and/or were resident cells of the normal myocardium. Irradiated male Wistar rats transplanted with beta-actin promoter-driven, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled, unfractionated bone marrow cells were subjected to coronary artery ligation. Three weeks after MI, GFP-labeled bone marrow cells were detected in the infarct region, and a modest number were associated with nestin immunoreactivity. The paucity of GFP+/nestin+ cells in the scar tissue provided the impetus to explore whether neural-like stem cells were derived from cardiac tissue. Nestin mRNA and immunoreactivity were detected in normal rat myocardium, and transcript levels were increased in the damaged heart after MI. In primary-passage, cardiac tissue-derived neural cells, filamentous nestin staining was associated with a diffuse, cytoplasmic glial fibrillary acidic protein signal. Unexpectedly, in viable myocardium, numerous nestin+/glial fibrillary acidic protein+ fiberlike structures of varying length were detected and observed in close proximity to neurofilament-M+ fibers. The infarct region was likewise innervated, and the preponderance of neurofilament-M+ fibers appeared to be physically associated with nestin+ fiberlike structures. These data highlight the novel observation that the normal rat heart contained resident nestin+/glial fibrillary acidic protein+ neural-like stem cells, fiberlike structures, and nestin mRNA levels that were increased in response to myocardial ischemia. Cardiac tissue-derived neural stem cell migration to the infarct region and concomitant nestin+ fiberlike innervation represent obligatory events of reparative fibrosis in the damaged rat myocardium. Department of Physiology, University of Montreal, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=16230517


    Cited L-selectin literature
    • Biancone L, Cantaluppi V, Duo D, Deregibus MC, Torre C and Camussi G (2004). Role of L-selectin in the vascular homing of peripheral blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells. J Immunol 173: 5268-74. Ex vivo expanded endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent a new potential approach for the revascularization of ischemic sites. However, local accumulation of infused EPCs in these sites is poor, and the mechanisms responsible for their homing are largely unknown. We observed the expression of L-selectin, an adhesion receptor that regulates lymphocyte homing and leukocyte rolling and migration, on ex vivo expanded blood-derived human EPCs. When EPCs were subcloned in SV40-T large Ag-transfected isolates, the copresence of L-selectin and endothelial lineage markers was confirmed. We therefore demonstrated that the expression of L-selectin by EPCs was functional because it mediates interaction with a murine endothelial cell line (H.end) expressing L-selectin ligands by way of transfection with alpha(1,3/4)-fucosyltransferase. Indeed, adhesion of EPCs after incubation at 4 degrees C on a rotating platform was enhanced on alpha(1,3/4)-fucosyltransferase-transfected H.end cells compared with control vector-transfected cells, and treatment with anti-L-selectin Abs prevented this event. We then studied the role of L-selectin in EPC homing in vivo. H.end cells were implanted s.c. in SCID mice to form endothelioma tumors, and EPCs were subsequently i.v. injected. L-selectin+ EPCs localized into alpha(1,3/4)-fucosyltransferase-transfected endothelial tumors to a greater extent than in control tumors, and they were able to directly contribute to tumor vascularization by forming L-selectin+ EPC-containing vessels. In conclusion, our results showed that a mechanism typical of leukocyte adhesion is involved in the vascular homing of EPCs within sites of selectin ligand expression. This observation may provide knowledge about the substrate to design strategies to improve EPC localization in damaged tissues. Department of Internal Medicine, University of Torino, Italy. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15470072
    • Sackstein R (2004). The bone marrow is akin to skin: HCELL and the biology of hematopoietic stem cell homing. J Invest Dermatol 122: 1061-9. The recent findings that adult stem cells are capable of generating new blood vessels and parenchymal cells within tissues they have colonized has raised immense optimism that these cells may provide functional recovery of damaged organs. The use of adult stem cells for regenerative therapy poses the challenging task of getting these cells into the requisite sites with minimum morbidity and maximum efficiency. Ideally, tissue-specific colonization could be achieved by introducing the stem cells intravascularly and exploiting the native physiologic processes governing cell trafficking. Critical to the success of this approach is the use of stem cells bearing appropriate membrane molecules that mediate homing from vascular to tissue compartments. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) express a novel glycoform of CD44 known as hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand (HCELL). This molecule is the most potent E-selectin ligand natively expressed on any human cell. This article reviews our current understanding of the molecular basis of HSC homing and will describe the fundamental "roll" of HCELL in opening the avenues for efficient HSC trafficking to the bone marrow, the skin and other extramedullary sites. Department of Dermatology and Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Skin Disease Research Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. rsackstein@rics.bwh.harvard.edu http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15140204
    • Perry SS, Wang H, Pierce LJ, Yang AM, Tsai S and Spangrude GJ (2004). L-selectin defines a bone marrow analog to the thymic early T-lineage progenitor. Blood 103: 2990-6. The recent description of an early T-lineage progenitor (ETP) population in adult mouse thymus implies the presence of a bone marrow predecessor that has not yet been identified. Here we describe a Lin(Neg) Sca-1(Pos) c-kit(Hi) Thy-1.1(Neg) L-selectin(Pos) adult mouse bone marrow population that resembles the thymic ETP in both antigen expression phenotype and posttransplantation lineage potential. These cells produce wavelike kinetics of thymic seeding and reconstitute the irradiated thymus with kinetics comparable to a thymocyte graft after intravenous transplantation. Transient B-lineage reconstitution is also observed, but little myeloid potential can be detected in transplant experiments. A second subset of progenitors is L-selectin(Neg) and is highly enriched for rapid and persistent T- and B-lineage potential, as well as some myeloid potential. L-selectin (CD62L) is therefore an effective marker for separating lymphoid progenitors from myeloid progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells in mouse bone marrow. Department of Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City 84132, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15070675
    • Joseph A, Hossain P, Jham S, Jones RE, Tighe P, McIntosh RS and Dua HS (2003). Expression of CD34 and L-selectin on human corneal keratocytes. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 44: 4689-92. PURPOSE: To investigate the expression of CD34, a hematopoietic stem cell marker and an adhesion molecule, and its ligand L-selectin in the human cornea. METHODS: Seventeen normal adult human corneal specimens were studied by immunohistochemistry using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against all three classes of the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 and its ligand L-selectin. An additional six corneal specimens were used for protein extraction and analysis by Western blotting, using the CD34 and L-selectin antibodies. PCR was used to determine expression of mRNA for CD34 and L-selectin in the corneal specimens. RESULTS: Only corneal keratocytes showed positive immunostaining for all three classes of CD34. Western blotting confirmed the expression of CD34 by these cells and mRNA expression for CD34 in the corneal stroma was demonstrated by PCR. For L-selectin, positive staining around keratocytes was noted on immunohistochemistry but L-selectin could not be detected either by Western blotting or PCR. CONCLUSIONS: Normal human corneal keratocytes express all three classes of CD34. The expression of this adhesion molecule on corneal keratocytes suggests that it may have a role in keeping the keratocytes anchored in their microniche, between the collagen lamellae. The positive staining for L-selectin found by immunohistochemistry but not by Western blotting or PCR would indicate the presence of either another ligand from the selectin family or a cross-reactive epitope on corneal keratocytes. Larry A. Donoso Laboratory for Eye Research, Division of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Centre, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=14578387
    • Lepique AP, Palencia S, Irjala H and Petrie HT (2003). Characterization of vascular adhesion molecules that may facilitate progenitor homing in the post-natal mouse thymus. Clin Dev Immunol 10: 27-33. T cell progenitors derive from the bone marrow but must migrate via bloodstream to the thymus in order to differentiate. The mechanism by which the thymus recruits progenitors from the blood is unknown. It is known, however, that there are receptive and refractory periods for progenitor recruitment and that when cells are imported, they enter the thymus through post-capillary venules. Therefore, recruitment is an active process temporally and spatially regulated. In order to characterize the mechanism of recruitment, we evaluated vascular signals known to regulate leukocyte extravasation, with respect to their intrathymic location and temporal fluctuations. We find that CD34, MECA79, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and VAP-1 are all expressed in thymic blood vessels. MECA79 and VAP-1 appear to be specific for post-capillary venules, while ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are also found on intrathymic stromal cells. MAdCAM is also expressed in the thymus, but is not associated with vascular tissues. Only MECA79 is upregulated during recruitment peaks, suggesting a role for this molecule in the periodicity of recruitment. Together, these studies reveal potential roles for L-selectin ligands, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and VAP-1 in progenitor recruitment to the thymus, and implicate the presence of other periodic signals, such as chemokines and cytokines, that cooperate to execute this essential function. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Box 341, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=14575155
    Last edited by Wise Young; 5 Mar 2006, 8:53 PM.

    Comment


      #3
      OMG!

      Dr. Young my love...


      That's so much information; your crazy in such a good way.

      I wont take it.
      Birds Fly in Flocks, but Eagles Fly Alone...

      Comment


        #4
        Spidergirl,

        I know wcrabtex, he is a (plastic) surgeon. Good guy. I think Dr. Young is also a good guy. Heed what they post.

        I doubt fowl tainted pond scum is a good investment, unless of course, you're the one selling it.

        Comment


          #5
          this stem cell pills reminds me of the the human growth hormone powder pills that is sold via internet sales. the HGH that these people sell is not related to the real human growth hormone that is manufactured by the drug companies.
          cauda equina

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Schmeky
            Spidergirl,

            I know wcrabtex, he is a (plastic) surgeon. Good guy. I think Dr. Young is also a good guy. Heed what they post.

            I doubt fowl tainted pond scum is a good investment, unless of course, you're the one selling it.
            David,

            I am sooooooooooooo OFF it. We all should be. This is why I posted. Besides, I refuse with a capital R to destroy my body more than it already is. My medication is already unbearable. I dont need a stem cell capsule to chase them down. Yuck.
            Birds Fly in Flocks, but Eagles Fly Alone...

            Comment


              #7
              Spidergirl,

              I think you are an intelligent person sharing your intelligence with the rest of us common folk.

              I give you an 10.5 on a scale of 1-10

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Schmeky
                Spidergirl,

                I think you are an intelligent person sharing your intelligence with the rest of us common folk.

                I give you an 10.5 on a scale of 1-10
                David,

                Ur very sweet. I don't know nearly as much as u about SCI. I learn from u. We all learn from eachother. (some more so than others)
                Birds Fly in Flocks, but Eagles Fly Alone...

                Comment


                  #9
                  When I was first injured I met a guy on CC (won't name names) that gave me his "recipe" for diferent type of pills. I was so desperate that I tried it for a couple of months at a huge expense. Needless to say it didn't do a darn thing but drain my bank account. When the real cure comes along believe me we will know because it will be plastered everywhere.

                  Deb
                  "Save the last dance for me!"

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Oddly, reminds me of "diet pills".

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Will this pills kill me if i take it?I m trying it tomorrow.Hope its help on my condition.I will give a reply if it shows some recovery.

                      Comment

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