Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Park, et al. (2005). Treatment of complete spinal cord injury patients by autologous bone marrow cell transplantation and administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Park, et al. (2005). Treatment of complete spinal cord injury patients by autologous bone marrow cell transplantation and administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    This is the first reported study of bone marrow stem cell transplants into patients with spinal cord injury. They transplanted the cells alongside giving a hormone that stimulates the cells. They found significant improvements.


    Park H, Shim Y, Ha Y, Yoon S, Park S, Choi B and Park H (2005). Treatment of complete spinal cord injury patients by autologous bone marrow cell transplantation and administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. Tissue Eng. 11: 913-22. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into the injured spinal cord has been found to improve neurologic functions in experimental animal studies. However, it is unclear whether bone marrow cells can similarly improve the neurologic functions of complete spinal cord injury (SCI) in human patients. To address this issue, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of autologous bone marrow cell transplantation (BMT) in conjunction with the administration of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in six complete SCI patients. BMT in the injury site (1.1 x 10(6) cells/microL in a total of 1.8 mL) and subcutaneous GM-CSF administration were performed on five patients. One patient was treated with GM-CSF only. The follow-up periods were from 6 to 18 months, depending on the patients. Sensory improvements were noted immediately after the operations. Sensory recovery in the sacral segment was noted mainly 3 weeks to 7 months postoperatively. Significant motor improvements were noted 3 to 7 months postoperatively. Four patients showed neurologic improvements in their American Spiral Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades (from A to C). One patient improved to AIS grade B from A and the last patient remained in AIS grade A. No immediate worsening of neurologic symptoms was found. Side effects of GMCSF treatment such as a fever (>38 degrees C) and myalgia were noted. Serious complications increasing mortality and morbidity were not found. The follow-up study with magnetic resonance imaging 4-6 months after injury showed slight enhancement within the zone of BMT. Syrinx formation was not definitely found. BMT and GM-CSF administration represent a safe protocol to efficiently manage SCI patients, especially those with acute complete injury. To demonstrate the full therapeutic value of this protocol, long-term and more comprehensive case-control clinical studies are required. Department of Neurosurgery, Inha University College of Medicine, Inchon, South Korea. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...231&query_hl=2

    #2
    Isn't this what Dr.Kleinbloesem is doing? [minus the factor, of course]

    Comment


      #3
      How recent were these patients' injuries?

      I can't tell from the article, but it sounds like they were all acutes. Do we know if they're working with any chronics?

      Comment


        #4
        This is great news. Not only because improvement was noted, but rather because humans are starting to benefit.

        Comment


          #5
          Dr. Y,

          Those S. Korean's!! Thanx for the info Dr. Y.

          ip,

          Not enough data to compare this to Dr. Kleinbloesem. I undestand he is going to incorporate a "growth factor" at the first of 2006. He is supposed to publish soon; then we can make a better comparison.

          Comment


            #6
            Is ambulation possible at ASIA C ?

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by ip
              Isn't this what Dr.Kleinbloesem is doing? [minus the factor, of course]
              YES!

              Notice this one too is from South Korea. Korean scientists mean business!!

              They ACT on going from lab to bedside.

              My next trip will be to Turkey or Korea!!

              If we have some Korean scientists involved in the decision making at the China SCI Network, I have no doubt things could move fast there too!!

              Comment


                #8
                ASIA A - You can drink beer with a straw.
                ASIA B - You can drink beer from a cup.
                ASIA C - You can waddle to the refrigerator for a beer.
                ASIA D - You can walk to a bar for a beer [can't walk back, though]

                Comment


                  #9
                  ip,

                  You're nuts! Don't ever change

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Kate, that was my question, too, when I saw this abstract. I am fairly certain that this is in chronic spinal cord injury and not acute or else the abstract would have mentioned a variety of other issues associated with acute spinal cord injury. However, it is not possible to tell from the abstract alone. I had to pay for a subscription to the journal Tissue Engineering and unfortunately their web site would not allow me to download the file after I paid (Grrrr... especially since I am friends with Mary Ann Liebert, since I helped them start one of the their most successful journals "Journal of Neurotrauma"). I wanted to look at the full paper to answer some of the questions here. I called and contacted them through email and hope to get the reprint soon, and can answer the question.

                    Faye, please know that Darwin Prockop has been trying now for over 2 years to get funding from NIH to initiate a bone marrow stem cell transplantation trial for spinal cord injury, in the United States. I am writing a grant to do a bone marrow stem cell trial right now to the state of New Jersey to support his trial to be done in New Jersey. The passage of CRPA would help accelerate the availability of federal funding for such trials. Regarding ChinaSCINet, bone marrow is one of the therapies that we are considering.

                    Schmeky, ASIA C implies that that the motor control is not sufficient to be "useful" in the legs.

                    IP, you make me laugh and cry. I wish that your scale were true. Christopher Reeve had recovered enough to be an ASIA C but probably would not have been able to "waddle to the refridgerator". A person with ASIA D would have been able to do so. Please note that the paper was published in May and probably was submitted 6 months ago. In the paper, they reported 18 month followup studies on some of the patients. This suggests that they started doing this trial about 2 years ago. The results are impressive, nevertheless.

                    Wise.
                    Last edited by Wise Young; 3 Aug 2005, 6:56 PM.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Wise Young
                      please know that Darwin Prockop has been trying now for over 2 years to get funding from NIH to initiate a bone marrow stem cell transplantation trial for spinal cord injury, in the United States. I am writing a grant to do a bone marrow stem cell trial right now to the state of New Jersey to support his trial to be done in New Jersey. The passage of CRPA would help accelerate the availability of federal funding for such trials. Regarding ChinaSCINet, bone marrow is one of the therapies that we are considering.


                      Are you or Darwin Prockop proposing a treatment involving bone marrow stem cell transplants by themselves or in some form of combination?
                      ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Dr Y,

                        When I drove down to Tulane about a year ago to tour the research facility, I met with the program director, Dr. Brian Butcher. He indicated their funding was secure and they were setting up their GMP lab and coordinating with their research partners in Sweden. I met Darwin Prockop briefly as he was heading out to catch a flight home.

                        The last time I spoke with Dr. Butcher (3-4 months ago), he indicated the delay was due to the loss of some key personnel. Not disputing what you have said, it's just different from what I've been told.

                        Lastly, Dr. Butcher indicated their BMSC therapies (at their facility) would not be applied to chronics in my lifetime. This obviously has no direct implications for other research facilities.
                        Last edited by Schmeky; 4 Aug 2005, 10:35 AM. Reason: Changed Switzerland to Sweden

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Dr. Young, if you say that this is good news, I am very very happy! Whenever you have time, can you axplain please how to they do it from bone marrow? Is it easy to do? Where do they need to get the bone marrow? From relatives? ty,manouli.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by manouli
                            Dr. Young, if you say that this is good news, I am very very happy! Whenever you have time, can you axplain please how to they do it from bone marrow? Is it easy to do? Where do they need to get the bone marrow? From relatives? ty,manouli.
                            Manouli, Dr. Kleinbloesem's procedure uses your own bonemarrow. My son Jason's bone marrow was already collected from one of the two locations they had prepared.
                            We were told that everyone is different.....sometimes they can't get enough even from both areas....It turned out needle insertion in just one location was needed for Jason even though both areas had been numbed with a local anesthetic. Jason's bonemarrow came gushing out, it was hard to keep up with the 25 or so collection vials that needed filling. Apparently that was unusual, it was the first time the doctor had seen this. ( it was funny ...he spoke german to me and I aswered him in english....and we could understand each other perfectly)

                            The areas used were on the back, near where I would normally expect the sacro-iliac joint.
                            Last edited by Faye; 3 Aug 2005, 9:34 PM.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              bone marrow

                              DR.wise how about TM like me would this procedure be good for TM patients?anty
                              For every minute you're angry you lose a second of happiness

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X