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University of Louisville C5 Quadriplegic | Stepping Experiment

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    University of Louisville C5 Quadriplegic | Stepping Experiment

    C5 Quadriplegic | Stepping Experiment https://youtu.be/enjqVbNvcHA via @YouTube
    "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

    -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

    #2
    that was awesome please keep updating thank u

    Comment


    • Norm
      Norm commented
      Editing a comment
      I suggest you sub to his youtube channel.

    #3
    New hope for people living with spinal cord injuries https://wisn.com/article/new-hope-fo...uries/41826293
    "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

    -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

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      #4
      can you put the text? I can't see it in my location.

      Comment


        #5

        New hope for people living with spinal cord injuries

        Patrick Paolantonio
        11-14 minutes


        As the 5 o'clock hour closes in, Stephanie Miller settles in to her position. A headset over her ears. A microphone in front of her mouth. Both will be her connection to her crew for the next 30 minutes. As a news and sports producer at WISN 12, Miller is the quarterback when her team is on the air. She's the one calling the shots, making sure reporters, anchors and the technical crew are all on the same page.It's a fast-paced, high-stress job that she's been doing for more than two decades.At work, and in life, nothing stops her. "I don't like to be told I can't do anything," Miller said. "And if you're gonna tell me I can't do something, I'm gonna want to do it 12 times over."She said that attitude and perseverance have kept her going since a life-altering car crash at the age of 17. She was in high school when it happened and lost movement from her chest down."I've never had an opportunity to do any sort of rehab that would have a promise of actually getting movement and or sensation back, " Miller said.Thirty years after her crash, Miller is determined to get back some of what she lost."Whether it's a wiggle of the toe, a bending of the finger, any sensation. Anything I get back at this point will be a blessing," she said.She's finding hope, hundreds of miles from home at the University of Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky. Miller is a participant in The Big Idea, a research study funded by the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation."Epidural stimulation is, works by putting an electrode in the lower part of the spinal cord where we know very important circuitry exists," said Susan Harkema, Ph. D., the principal investigator of the study. "And, so what we're able to do is use electric fields to enable the spinal cord to work more like it did before the injury."The device is surgically implanted. Miller received her device in late July.In mid-August, "We went to mapping, which is basically they turn on the stimulator for the first time and try to figure out how much juice it takes for each muscle to get going and for blood pressure as well," Miller said. The first time they turned on the stimulator, "I felt my leg jump was the first thing," she said. The stimulator is helping to reawaken and fire up her muscles. "My muscles are like, 'Hey, what are you doing to us?' And I think that's why, how I get so tired, too, because my muscles, even though I myself am not moving them, they're actually moving and doing things that they haven't done in 30 years."Starting in September, the research team strapped her into a harness that helps her stand."It was amazing," she said of her first time standing. "It was weird to be able to see eye to eye with people. It was weird to see out the window in full view. It was, I looked down at my feet, and I went, 'Wow, I'm not a very tall person, but my feet looked like they were super far away. It was amazing.'" Standing with the use of a harness is now a daily occurrence. Each weekday, Miller spends several hours in the clinic, where the research team gets her on her feet. She's monitored from head to toe, from her posture to her blood pressure. "I get my blood pressure taken probably 10, 11, 12 times a day, constantly have it on my arm," Miller said. "As we're doing the experiments and the training, they're taking my blood pressure."The research team turns on the stimulator during each session. A tablet allows them to control the amount of stimulation, which is specific to each individual and task. In early October, WISN 12 News went to the clinic at the University of Louisville, to see how Miller is progressing. The day we visited, she stood with the use of a harness for 30 minutes over three increments. At one point during our visit, "I was able to extend my right leg and squeeze it," she said. "I was also able to straighten my hip. This is the first time that I and since training started that I was able to will my leg and my hip to go into extension." WISN 12 News Anchor Patrick Paolantonio asked, "You were controlling it?" Miller responded, "They were telling me I was doing the controlling." Paolantonio followed up, "for the first time in 30 years?" "Yeah, I pretty much moved my leg and my hip in the standing position to hold myself up," said Miller. A significant moment, and she's just getting started.Our visit came during Miller's second week of training sessions. In all, she'll have approximately 160 sessions over several months. Core work is a big part of her training. Between the clinic and home, Miller said she's now doing core exercises for four hours each weekday and another three hours each day on the weekends. She can take a tablet home to control the stimulation, so she can get her required training assignments done. Miller also said she's now standing with assistance for two hours each day. Just weeks after our visit."The primary outcome measure of this study, the primary focus is if we can improve cardiovascular function," Harkema said. She said they're looking at the participants' overall health, adding that "unfortunately, people with chronic spinal cord injury have continuous medical issues. Bowel, bladder does not function well. Heart, respiratory problems. Skin breakdown. Infections. All those things are just ongoing medical issues." Researchers hope to one day put this treatment into widespread use. "It's not a cure. It certainly seems to be changing function, both motor and autonomic, sufficiently to really change quality of life," said Susan Harkema, Ph.D. Of the 36 people in this study, Miller has the second oldest injury. At this point, she doesn't know where it will lead, but she's hopeful. "I always call myself a guinea pig because that's basically what I am," she said. "I'm a guinea pig that, yes, who can help people hopefully down the road and hopefully maybe get a little bit out of it for myself as well."LINK to The Big Idea/Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation - https://reevebigidea.org/
        "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

        -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

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