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Doctors might have figured out how to cure spinal cord injuries

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    Doctors might have figured out how to cure spinal cord injuries

    February 24th, 2021 at 8:06 PM
    By Chris Smith
    • Doctors from Yale successfully demonstrated a potential precursor for a paralysis cure following spinal cord injuries.
    • The researchers collected stem cells from the bone marrow of patients suffering from various types of spinal cord injuries and then injected the patients with their own stem cells.
    • Within weeks after the stem cell therapy, the doctors observed substantial improvements in more than half of the patients, including the ability to walk or use their hands.


    Accidents that impact the spinal cord can leave survivors with various degrees of paralysis. The worst type of spinal cord injuries can lead to permanent loss of sensory and motor function, meaning people will lose feeling below the region of the injury as well as movement. As it stands, there’s no way to restore spinal cord function.

    Researchers are studying various ways to treat spinal cord injuries, though. A team from Yale and the Sapporo Medical University in Japan has figured out a way to potentially cure paralysis and restore sensory and motor function. The doctors used stem cells procured directly from the injured volunteers to repair spinal cord injuries.

    The researchers collected stem cells (MSC) from a patient’s bone marrow, which were then injected intravenously into the same person. This led to significant improvement in motor function for more than half of the patients in the study. More than half regained the ability to walk or use their hands after receiving the treatment.

    [...]

    https://bgr.com/science/paralysis-cu...ry-yale-study/
    Last edited by Oddity; 7 Sep 2021, 11:13 AM. Reason: DO NOT POST COPYRIGHTED ARTICLES IN FULL
    C-5, 6 SCI. Took about 6 months to walk. Walking full time. Without any assistance since Nov. 2003 and will make a full recovery

    #2
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-20112-4

    Comment


      #3
      This is another wonderful leap forward for mice.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by mj23 View Post
        February 24th, 2021 at 8:06 PM
        By Chris Smith
        • Doctors from Yale successfully demonstrated a potential precursor for a paralysis cure following spinal cord injuries.
        • The researchers collected stem cells from the bone marrow of patients suffering from various types of spinal cord injuries and then injected the patients with their own stem cells.
        • Within weeks after the stem cell therapy, the doctors observed substantial improvements in more than half of the patients, including the ability to walk or use their hands.


        Accidents that impact the spinal cord can leave survivors with various degrees of paralysis. The worst type of spinal cord injuries can lead to permanent loss of sensory and motor function, meaning people will lose feeling below the region of the injury as well as movement. As it stands, there’s no way to restore spinal cord function.

        Researchers are studying various ways to treat spinal cord injuries, though. A team from Yale and the Sapporo Medical University in Japan has figured out a way to potentially cure paralysis and restore sensory and motor function. The doctors used stem cells procured directly from the injured volunteers to repair spinal cord injuries.

        The researchers collected stem cells (MSC) from a patient’s bone marrow, which were then injected intravenously into the same person. This led to significant improvement in motor function for more than half of the patients in the study. More than half regained the ability to walk or use their hands after receiving the treatment.

        [...]

        https://bgr.com/science/paralysis-cu...ry-yale-study/
        OK, this seems like it would be as easily done here in the US if we decided that having a SCI was worse than death. We have approved the same autosomal cell use in the treatment of cancer and one type, I believe, of anemia. They obviously also view the acute phase as longer than a week as most are not moved into rehab where they would be outfitted with cuffs and such for self feeding, etc by the end of week one and it takes about 40 days to extract, separate by type and grow the stem cells. The only hold up in Japan was putting the use of the cells in this condition and by IV through an ethics hearing. So, please, if you are a peer mentor to the still hospitalized acutely injured quit with the "you can still do everything just differently" and head into something like "oh, if you never liked hiking, being a soldier, making snowmen with your kids, any form of modesty, dancing and head banging sex including real orgasms you will love paralysis. If you enjoyed any of the above than learn enough to use a computer with a search engine on how to free yourself because noone really sees this as a terible, life shortening and miserable way to go on and find a way you can shorten your stay in this state."
        Or am I wrong and someone is fast tracking this to acute hospitals and neurosurgeons allover the US? Wise?
        Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

        Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

        Comment


        • SCI-Nurse
          SCI-Nurse commented
          Editing a comment
          Wise never comes to these forums anymore. You would do better to reach him by attending one of the virtual open house events for the Keck Center, as he does take questions there. (KLD)

        #5
        Been to many until we retired to the midwest. Now I plan on visits to more local labs that tend to collaborate in regenitive cures.
        Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

        Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

        Comment

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