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    $40,000,000 Stem Cell Donation

    from Hong Kong billionaire
    Source

    HK billionaire donates Berkeley $40M for stem cell research

    www.chinaview.cn 2005-06-27 12:48:10

    BEIJING, June 27 (Xinhuanet) -- Charitable foundation of Hong Kong billionaire Li Ka-shing has donated $40 million to the University of California at Berkeley, campus officials said Thursday.
    Hong Kong billionaire Li Ka-shing's charitable foundation has donated $40 million to fund a center to research stem cell and brain imaging technology at the University of California at Berkeley.

    This donation from the Li Ka Shing Foundation will be used to establish a research center focused on new scientific fields including stem cell biology and brain imaging, according to campus officials.

    "I am a firm believer in the spirit of public-private partnership, and I am excited by the advanced work Berkeley is undertaking," says billionaire philanthropist Li Ka-shing in a statement. "The work and research being done there will result in phenomenal benefits to mankind."

    Li's donation will jump-start planning on a new $160 million scientific research center slated for construction in 2007. Construction will be completed in 2009.

    The building will be named the "Li Ka-shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences."

    It is the largest international gift in the university's history.

    Li's wealth is a far cry from his humble beginnings in Chaozhou, mainland China where his work ethic and strong commitment to learning grew after his own education took a back seat after his father died when he was 12.

    He established the Li Ka-shing Foundation in 1980 to coordinate donations for education, medicine, and cultural and community welfare. Enditem

    (Agencies)

    #2
    i think its great all the attention new research is getting..i also thinks awsome that somone see,s the potential enough to donate this kind of money...but wouldnt it be wiser to donate to an already established research facility rather than donate it to a group who needs to build a new building..seems kind of foolish to me..shit the building wont be completed till 2009.how is this going to bennifit anyone in the near future?but then,,with all the phases of trials,safety testes,compiling of datta and waiting to see any side effects..i guess we are still a very longs ways away form any cures anyhow..

    scott r
    scott r

    Comment


      #3
      Very generous of him but I kinda wish he had donated it to the HKU-SCI fund instead. [img]/forum/images/smilies/frown.gif[/img]

      [This message was edited by seneca on 06-28-05 at 10:44 AM.]

      Comment


        #4
        Hey Steve, thanks for posting.

        It is very encouraging to see philanthropists put such huge amounts of money into this revolutionary medicine.

        ~ The recipe for perpetual ignorance is: be satisfied with your opinions and content with your knowledge ~ Elbert Hubbard (1856 - 1915)
        www.CureParalysisNow.org

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by seneca:

          Very generous of him but I kinda wish he had donated it the the HKU-SCI fund instead. [img]/forum/images/smilies/frown.gif[/img]
          I was just thinking the same thing. Perhaps Suzanne will be or has contacted him.
          Please submit your photo and story of hope:

          http://bridges2hope.unite2fightparalysis.org/


          http://unite2fightparalysis.org/

          Comment


            #6
            where's Bill Gates?

            Comment


              #7
              Call me a party pooper [img]/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img] but I think it's a wasted opportunity. It's going towards a $160m building only scheduled to be completed in 2009. Sad. If the guy was that interested in helping people, he would have found current projects to fund anonymously, not built some building that will no doubt have his name emblazed on it for eternity.

              --
              Lack of money is the root of all evil.
              _____oOo_____
              Phil C6
              "If you can't explain it to me in less than 10 seconds, it's probably not worth knowing anyway..." - Calvin

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Phil:

                Call me a party pooper [img]/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img] but I think it's a wasted opportunity. It's going towards a $160m building only scheduled to be completed in 2009. Sad. If the guy was that interested in helping people, he would have found current projects to fund anonymously, not built some building that will no doubt have his name emblazed on it for eternity.

                --
                Lack of money is the root of all evil.
                i agree. wasted $40 million. no wonder why new therapies stay in the research phase.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I think he should have donated the money to the Miami project to build more buildings to compliment that one beautiful building they now have.

                  I think that money would have been much better donated to the Koreans who recently announced the major breakthrough in Stem Cells.
                  "Life is about how you
                  respond to not only the
                  challenges you're dealt but
                  the challenges you seek...If
                  you have no goals, no
                  mountains to climb, your
                  soul dies".~Liz Fordred

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The building will be named the "Li Ka-shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences."
                    Great donation, but his name will be on the building, forever [img]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/img]!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      A new building will entise strong researchers to come on board. The best researchers should be able to aquire grant money to do the work.


                      JJG
                      Jake's Pop

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I wish to disagree with the opinions expressed.

                        There is no question that, like all other great human endeavors, science requires a place to be done, a place that has the equipment and facilities to attract great scientists and allow them to do their work. How come we don't hear complaints when AT&T builds a new building in Manhattan to house their business activities, when a hospital is built for taking care of children, or when a university puts up a new building for AIDS research?

                        Whether the building is scheduled to be completed in 2009 or not is irrelevant. The fact that the building is being built will attract scientists to come to Berkeley. I am currently hearing arguments against brick and mortar here in New Jersey, politicians and others who are saying that they don't think that stem cell research bond should be paying for brick and mortar. It is sad because they don't understand how science is done, the need for new facilities, and the importance of achieving critical mass with a building.

                        Stem cell research cuts across all life science disciplines. That is one of the reason why the NIH has had such a difficult time identifying more stem cell researchers. There is superb stem cell science being done in zoology, veterinary medicine, medicine, cell biology, molecular biology, neuroscience, oncology, hematology, physiology, biomedical engineering, and many other disciplines. How does one get everybody together?

                        There are certain common and expensive equipment that stem cell scientists need. These include state-of-the-art cell sorters, proteomics, gene expression laboratories, tissue culture robots, imaging, transgenic animal facilities, and clinical facilities for collecting and implanting stem cells. In order for these activities to be carried out in an existing institution, stem cell scientists and clinicians have to spend a great deal of time displacing and competing for space and resources within a university. These kinds of activities take up a lot more time and energy than you think.

                        Should we be expecting that we can get world class interdisciplinary science without a facility? Universities have to work very hard to attract the right people, put them close to each other, provide them with shared equipment so that they have to work with each other, and protect them from the ravages of public opinion so that they can get their work done.

                        I know Li Ka-shing and am proud that he is the first major Chinese philanthropist to invest seriously in American stem cell science. I am glad that he recognizes that stem cell research in the United States is worth investing $40 million into. Can you imagine the pressure he has to invest in Chinese or Hong Kong stem cell stem cell research? The fact that he chose to do so in California is also a testament to the beneficial effects of Proposition 71.

                        Finally, what is in a name? If you donate $40 million, the institution usually will insist on putting the donor's name on the facility, usually in the hopes of getting another generous donation. Before people start criticizing this donation, perhaps they should ask the question why Li Kashing (who is an astute businessman) is investing in Berkeley. Find out more about what is so special about Berkley stem cell science that this businessman from Hong Kong would be putting this kind of money there.

                        Wise.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Wise Young:

                          Find out more about what is so special about Berkley stem cell science that this businessman from Hong Kong would be putting this kind of money there.

                          Wise.
                          They're doing some good work with neural stem cells. Combined with Li Ka-Shing's interest in brain imaging, it seems that his interest is in halting/helping neurological problems.

                          His foundation donated $60 million to HKU in April "to establish an institute of health sciences and to fund clinical studies". He followed that up with a $168 million donation to HKU in May.

                          The foundation has helped millions of disabled people with its donations in the past. Overall, Mr. Li sounds pretty cool.

                          -Steven
                          ...got a little secret, I ain't gonna tell
                          ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Wise,

                            Shouldn't it be the science that attracks the scientists and not so much bricks and mortar?

                            Sue

                            [This message was edited by Susan M on 06-28-05 at 08:50 PM.]
                            Please submit your photo and story of hope:

                            http://bridges2hope.unite2fightparalysis.org/


                            http://unite2fightparalysis.org/

                            Comment


                              #15
                              This will be state of the art. And bring in old and new scientific genius.

                              Now what color scheme would you like for your new office Dr. Wise?

                              [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img]

                              This philanthropist knows what he's doing..and what a wonderful heart to go along with his great mind.

                              I feel a bad moon rising~~
                              Life isn't about getting thru the storm but learning to dance in the rain.

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