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    CRISPR technology

    Does anyone know anything about this gene editing technology? I would enjoy a discussion about all the potential uses, and the many ethical questions they raise, but most immediately I am wondering if anyone sees a way that you could help us. I am also surprised that I haven?t heard more people talking about it. How is something so huge not getting more attention? Do you think fear has people holding back?

    And does anyone know if it is a proprietary technology controlled only by that company ? ? CRISPR Technologies ? or if any enterprising scientist or company could use it to develop their thing?

    #2
    Watch Unnatural Selection on Netflix if you can, its very interesting - but also kind of scary.
    https://www.netflix.com/gb/title/80208910

    You can buy the crispr kit the guy sells here https://www.the-odin.com/diy-crispr-kit/
    Last edited by niallel; 24 Nov 2019, 7:29 AM. Reason: added Netflix url

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      #3
      I don't think there's any way gene editing could help spinal cord injuries. There's nothing wrong with our genes (well, nothing that caused a spinal cord injury), and I don't see how editing DNA would cause nerves to magically grow back.

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        #4
        Gene therapy is a wide field with many opportunities. Imagine cells that
        • express ChABC
        • are "immune" to its own suppressors like Nogo, MAG OMgp
        • express a higher amount of growth factors
        • or all of the above at the same time. You can even insert "switches" for the genes in order to turn them off after you are cured. Development takes unfortunately a bit longer

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          #5
          Originally posted by funklab View Post
          I don't think there's any way gene editing could help spinal cord injuries. There's nothing wrong with our genes (well, nothing that caused a spinal cord injury), and I don't see how editing DNA would cause nerves to magically grow back.
          Perhaps for those with spinal cord disorders that are hereditary or have a hereditary component, such as MS, SMA (spinal muscle atrophy), or HSP (Hereditary spastic paraplegia), or other hereditary diseases that can cause paralysis and serious disability, ranging from MD (muscular dystrophy) to Huntington's chorea.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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            #6
            Originally posted by LukeTheDuke View Post
            Gene therapy is a wide field with many opportunities. Imagine cells that
            • express ChABC
            • are "immune" to its own suppressors like Nogo, MAG OMgp
            • express a higher amount of growth factors
            • or all of the above at the same time. You can even insert "switches" for the genes in order to turn them off after you are cured. Development takes unfortunately a bit longer
            Not suggesting anyone try this (please don't even think about it), but there is an example that illustrates your point.
            There have been a few trials using IGF1 (Insulin-like growth factor 1) and there is this: https://www.the-odin.com/frog-ge-kit/
            Last edited by niallel; 24 Nov 2019, 7:09 PM.

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              #7
              There is some interesting research into axolotls (Mexican salamanders). They have the ability to regrow limbs and their spinal cord and we share the same protein, but in humans it takes a different path.

              Echeverri's team traced the molecular mechanisms at work in each case. They found a particular protein called c-Fos, which affects gene expression, is essential to the processes axolotls use to repair injured nerves. While humans also have c-Fos, in humans the protein functions in concert with other proteins, in the JUN family, that cause cells to undergo reactive gliosis, which leads to scar formation. In axolotls, this molecular circuitry is carefully regulated to direct axolotl glial cells toward a regenerative response instead.



              https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-04-endangered-salamander-clues-spinal-cord.html
              Canadian bacon is a fraud !!!!

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                #8
                Originally posted by Random View Post
                Does anyone know anything about this gene editing technology? I would enjoy a discussion about all the potential uses, and the many ethical questions they raise, but most immediately I am wondering if anyone sees a way that you could help us. I am also surprised that I haven?t heard more people talking about it. How is something so huge not getting more attention? Do you think fear has people holding back?

                And does anyone know if it is a proprietary technology controlled only by that company ? ? CRISPR Technologies ? or if any enterprising scientist or company could use it to develop their thing?
                Hello Random, nice to see you around
                CRISPR technology it is very interesting also for SCI in my opinion (google ?CRISPR neurons? and you get an idea), but first we would need to have a map of the genes involved in the growth plan of neurons. I wish there were more research money directed to that area of research, but it does not seem a priority as much as it should be in my opinion.

                Paolo
                In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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