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Severed Spinal Cord Recovery

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
    Eisenhower.
    You don't go by Wise anymore?

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    • #17
      Dear Dr. Young,
      I had a severe accident causing me to be a T-10 complete.My spine was displaced from a construction accident. I went to Thomas Jefferson in Philly. My suregeon was Dr. Ratliff. He told my wife the cord was a mess and severed. Is there any tests like an MRI that would show a break in the cord? Or do you have to open the person back up again to see all of the damage. If my cord is seperated, would you recommend having a doctor like Dr. Cheng put me back together. I would just like your opinion so if there is hope with the stem cell sometime in the next few years, I would be a candidate too. Thank you.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Buck_Nastier View Post
        You don't go by Wise anymore?
        LOL. It is my iPad spelling corrector. It apparently thought that Wise was not an appropriate ending to my post and substituted Eisenhower. Wise.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JoeMonte View Post
          Dear Dr. Young,
          I had a severe accident causing me to be a T-10 complete.My spine was displaced from a construction accident. I went to Thomas Jefferson in Philly. My suregeon was Dr. Ratliff. He told my wife the cord was a mess and severed. Is there any tests like an MRI that would show a break in the cord? Or do you have to open the person back up again to see all of the damage. If my cord is seperated, would you recommend having a doctor like Dr. Cheng put me back together. I would just like your opinion so if there is hope with the stem cell sometime in the next few years, I would be a candidate too. Thank you.
          Joe, a severe injury at T10 that caused extensive destruction of the lumbosacral cord will require more than bridging of the "gap" and growth factors to stimulate regeneration of axons. It will require neuronal replacement. There is no question that stem cells will play an important role in the reconstruction of the spinal cord. We need more reseArch in the area.

          Wise.

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          • #20
            Joe, a severe injury at T10 that caused extensive destruction of the lumbosacral cord will require more than bridging of the "gap" and growth factors to stimulate regeneration of axons. It will require neuronal replacement.
            Wise, would polymer scaffolds be used in this situation? If not could you elaborate a little more as to what would be required? Maybe this isn't a question for you but isn't this an area that Invivo Therapeutics is working on?
            Thanks,
            Litespeed

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
              Clementine, there is a doctor (Henreich Cheng in Taiwan... You can search for more information about him in this forum) who specializes in the treatment of severed spinal cords, using peripheral nerve bridges and a cocktail of growth factors. Stem cell therapies alone are not likely to rebuild and reconnect a severed spinal cord, in my opinion. You have to do something to get the two ends of the spinal cord together. However, as I have said, I am skeptical about claims of severed spinal cords. They are very rare. Eisenhower.
              Thank you so much Dr. Young.

              Thank you too ButterflyMom.

              Comment


              • #22
                Dear Wise,
                Thank you for the reply. I fully understand what you are saying. Do we have digital imaging machines that see the spinal cord? Just wondering when they do work on a patient , they must want to see what is inside before they cut you open? Or would they need to cut you open to fully examine what has happened over time with scar tissue and age? It just seems interesting to figure out how doctors perceive chronic injuries and how they will confront the different levels of injury. Thanks again.

                Litespeed4, you mentioned Invivo. I have been looking for more information on them. It has been quite on this company lately. Ameritrade had some information on them getting a grant but you can't find there stock trade anywhere. I put in the symbols and nothing comes up. Have you heard anything on the polymer scaffolds?

                Wise,
                What is your theory on the polymer scaffolds? Its purpose is mainly to connect nerves.

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                • #23
                  Joe, Frank Reynolds, CEO of Invivo will be at Working to Walk so hopefully he will have news of their future plans. Their stock shows up on Schwab as NVIV:OTC. There has been a lot of work with scaffolds using different materials, growth factors, manufacturing process, etc... but Invivo will most likely be the first to apply to humans. Their work with primates looks impressive but to my knowledge they have not worked with chronic injuries yet. If you haven't seen his presentation at TEDXBoston it's worth a look.
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtPwGZ4y428

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                  • #24
                    Litespeed4,
                    Thanks for the update. I can't make it to the Working to walk. If you do , let me know what is said from Frank Reynolds. I would appreciate it. I have seen the video and it is impressive. Hopefully, he is really focused on the research instead of the money. Take care and thanks again. My email incase you get some more info. joemonte@nep.net. Best regards,
                    Joe

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by litespeed4 View Post
                      to my knowledge they have not worked with chronic injuries yet. If you haven't seen his presentation at TEDXBoston it's worth a look.
                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtPwGZ4y428
                      Reynolds explains their chronic work at about the 9:00 point
                      in that vid. He said they extract stem cells from the patient,
                      grow them for a few months, attach them to their device,
                      remove the "scar" tissue, implant the device with the stem
                      cells and bridge healthy tissue.

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                      • #26
                        Reynolds indicates the scaffold with autologous hNSC's works for chronic monkies. According to his estimated time line to trials, the scaffold with hNSC's will go to trial for chronics sometime in 2013, or about 2-3 years away.

                        At least it ain't 5.

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                        • #27
                          Schmeky, do you know if Reynolds has actually done the tests with chronic SCI in monkeys? My understanding is that this is planned for the future but has not actually been done. I don't want to be pessimistic but his explanation of how his technology would be applied to chronic SCI seems be over simplistic and or lack details. How does one just get rid of the "scar" tissue? If he is collaborating with Davies or incorporating chrondroitinase ABC then this would really be exciting.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by litespeed4 View Post
                            his explanation of how his technology would be applied to chronic SCI seems be over simplistic and or lack details. How does one just get rid of the "scar" tissue? If he is collaborating with Davies or incorporating chrondroitinase ABC then this would really be exciting.
                            I thought so too. I was hoping Reynolds might answer that
                            question at W2W because it looks like they plan on just
                            cutting out a chunk of spinal cord tissue, and that doesn't
                            make sense to me.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              do you know if Reynolds has actually done the tests with chronic SCI in monkeys?
                              Reynolds states in his presentation InVivo's 4 therapies are on the only spinal cord therapies in the world tested on primates with successful results. So essentially, based on the companies research, restorative therapies are a reality, at least in primates.

                              My guess is the reason for delaying the chronic trials is final FDA submittals and funding for the human trials. It appears as thought one trial (scaffolding) will be a precursor for the next trial, then followed by the next, etc. Reynolds is talking about 4 distinctly different treatments.

                              He is apparently planning the chronic thing last.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                                Clementine, there is a doctor (Henreich Cheng in Taiwan... You can search for more information about him in this forum) who specializes in the treatment of severed spinal cords, using peripheral nerve bridges and a cocktail of growth factors. Stem cell therapies alone are not likely to rebuild and reconnect a severed spinal cord, in my opinion. You have to do something to get the two ends of the spinal cord together. However, as I have said, I am skeptical about claims of severed spinal cords. They are very rare. Eisenhower.
                                Hi Dr. Wise,

                                I am a c6/7 complete inury from a motor vehicle accident, and no bone or object penetrated my cord. Yet, i saw an MRI of my spinal cord and above and below the injury site was the cord but at the injury site was a gap, full of celebralspinal fluid. So my spinal cord is severed from a contusion injury, otherwise there would be no gap with fluid in it. So my question is, why wouldn't you consider that a severed spinal cord? and how would repairing my injury be any different than the one you are reffering to above in Clementine's case? Does that make sense? thank you Dr. Wise

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