Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Combination therapy dramatically improves function after spinal cord injury in rats

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Combination therapy dramatically improves function after spinal cord injury in rats

    Combination therapy dramatically improves function after spinal cord injury in rats
    A combination therapy using transplanted cells plus two experimental drugs significantly improves function in paralyzed rats, a new study shows. The results suggest that a similar therapy may be useful in humans with spinal cord injury. The study was funded in part by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health, and appears in the June 2004 issue of Nature Medicine.*
    About 10,000 people in the United States suffer spinal cord injuries each year. Studies in animals during the past decade have shown that supporting cells from nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, called Schwann cells, can be used to make a "bridge" across the damaged spinal cord that encourages nerve fibers to regrow. Other research has suggested that a substance called cyclic AMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) can turn on growth factor genes in nerve cells, stimulating growth and helping to overcome signals that normally inhibit regeneration. This study is the first to try a combination of the two approaches in an animal model of spinal cord injury.

    In the new study, Mary Bartlett Bunge, Ph.D., Damien Pearse, Ph.D., and colleagues at the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis at the University of Miami School of Medicine, found that spinal cord injury triggers a loss of cAMP in the spinal cord and in some parts of the brain. They then transplanted Schwann cells into the spinal cords of rats in a way that bridged the damaged area. The researchers also gave the rats a form of cAMP and a drug called rolipram, which prevents cAMP from being broken down.

    Treatment with the triple-combination therapy preserved and even elevated cAMP levels in nerve cells after
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-ctd052104.php
    http://stores.ebay.com/MAKSYM-Variety-Store

    #2
    This is great news, Bring It on!!

    What one man can do another can do
    A good friend is someone who will come to bail you out of jail. A TRUE friend is the guy sitting next to you behind the same set of bars saying, "boy we sure f*cked up this time huh?"

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks Max.

      The therapies tested in this study were selected for their likely feasibility in humans, Dr. Kleitman adds. Rolipram has already been tested in clinical trials for other disorders, and Schwann cells can be grown from patients' own peripheral nerves.

      The researchers are now planning follow-up studies to confirm their results and to try to learn more about how the triple therapy works, Dr. Bunge says. Their studies might also lead to the development of better drugs to prevent the breakdown of cAMP, she adds.
      Arg, doesn't sound like they're planning on starting human trials anytime soon. Hopefully, another group will take up the mantle.

      Comment


        #4
        Walking Ability Improves in Miami Paralysis Study


        By Jane Sutton

        MIAMI (Reuters) - Rats with spinal cord injuries regained 70 percent of their normal walking function with a three-part treatment hailed as a breakthrough in paralysis research at the University of Miami School of Medicine.


        The study at the university's Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, due to be published on Monday in the June issue of the journal Nature Medicine, produced results "by far greater than what we've seen in anything else," said the principal researcher, Dr. Mary Bartlett Bunge.


        "It opens up a potential new avenue of treatment for human spinal cord injury," said Bunge, who declined to speculate when human trials might be attempted.


        The spinal cord carries messages between the brain and the muscles through a network of nerve cells. Normally, chemical signals prevent those nerves from regrowing, resulting in paralysis when the network is severed by an injury.


        Regrowing nerve cells and reconnecting them is the holy grail of spinal cord research.


        The Miami study involved hundreds

        Source

        "I do not believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use."
        - Galileo Galilei

        Comment


          #5
          Rats Regrow Damaged Nerves

          Rats Regrow Damaged Nerves

          May 23, 2004



          (Photo: AP)



          "This work opens up new possibilities for treatments for spinal cord-injured humans."
          Mary Bartlett Bunge



          (AP) A combination of therapies helped damaged spines regrow nerve fibers, researchers report in a study of rats.

          Three separate therapies, each of which had shown promise in earlier tests, were combined in the new effort by a team at the University of Miami, according to Sunday's online edition of the journal Nature Medicine.

          The combination therapy was designed by Damien D. Pearse and Mary Bartlett Bunge, who were looking for a way to help damaged nerve cells overcome signals that limit their growth after an injury.

          They combined cell grafts with the administration of a messenger molecule and the drug Rolipram in animals with spinal injuries. The therapy, they found, helped protect nerve fibers from dying and promoted new growth of fibers into, as well as beyond, the area of injury.

          "This work opens up new possibilities for treatments for spinal cord-injured humans," Bunge said in a statement.

          Naomi Kleitman, director of spinal cord injury research at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, said that in the future "it should be feasible to consider developing a clinical trial in this area" for injured people.

          Each part of the therapy was hailed in its own day as promising, but none provided much nerve growth, Kleitman said.
          http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/...in580930.shtml
          http://stores.ebay.com/MAKSYM-Variety-Store

          Comment


            #6
            Wecome Sen

            Hope Mike will approve & will not move it & lock in news like he did with Neurosurgical robots thread recently [img]/forum/images/smilies/eek.gif[/img] [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img] [img]/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img]

            Happy freakin Rats, Indeed[img]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/img]
            http://stores.ebay.com/MAKSYM-Variety-Store

            Comment


              #7
              dang why cant we get some of this now? It sucks to know there is something out there that can help and we cant get it.
              A CURE NOW!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by QuadPro:

                dang why cant we get some of this now? It sucks to know there is something out there that can help and we cant get it.
                this is not new news. thats why it could happen this year.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by DA:


                  this is not new news. thats why it could happen this year.
                  DA, from the article I posted in this thread:
                  "It opens up a potential new avenue of treatment for human spinal cord injury," said Bunge, who declined to speculate when human trials might be attempted.
                  "I do not believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use."
                  - Galileo Galilei

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Faye:

                    Originally posted by DA:

                    this is not new news. thats why it could happen this year.
                    DA, from the article I posted in this thread:
                    "It opens up a potential new avenue of treatment for human spinal cord injury," said Bunge, who declined to speculate when human trials might be attempted.
                    "I do not believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use."
                    - Galileo Galilei
                    faaaaaaaaaaaaye, there are many labs doing the same or similar combo's. I AM VERY HAPPY TO SAY THE MIAMI PROJECT DOESNT SPEAK FOR ALL OF THEM. before you doubt me again, do you wanna bet? i say second generation will start this year.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I don't have the information in front of me but let me add some information that is not present n the article from memory and then correct it later.

                      1. Rats were injured with the Impactor spinal cord contusion model (12.5 mm weight drop).

                      2. A subcutaneous infusion of Rolipram (a phosphodiesterase 4 inibitor) was started using an Alzet pump that delivers it continuously at about 0.25 mg/kg per day (low dose).

                      3. At one week after the injury, they transplanted Schwann cells into the spinal cord above and below the injury site.

                      4. At the time of the transplantation, they injected a small volume (10 µliters) of 50 µM dibutyryl cAMP into the injury site.

                      5. They evaluated walking and regeneration of spinal cord tracts at 6-12 weeks after implantation, db cAMP, and rolipram, comparing the combination against each of the treatments alone. None of the treatments alone were as good as Schwann cells plus dibutyryl cAMP and rolipram.

                      How does this combination therapy work? Rolipram blocks phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), the enzyme that breaks down cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) which is a messenger for axonal growth. In other words, when PDE4 is blocked, the amount of cAMP inside cells increases. However, they found that cAMP levels dropped to low levels in the spinal cord shortly after injury and giving rolipram did not raise the levels of cAMP above normal levels. However, they found that they could raise the level of cAMP by injecting dibutyryl cAMP into the spinal cord at the time of the Schwann cell transplantation.

                      Note that there are very likely to be many different ways of increasing cAMP levels in the spinal cord. It is also possible that other cells, such as olfactory ensheathing glia will work as well or better.

                      Wise.

                      [This message was edited by Wise Young on 05-24-04 at 11:52 AM.]

                      Comment


                        #12
                        regained 70 percent of their normal walking function
                        I could live with that.

                        Was this breakthrough achieved on CHRONIC contusions???

                        Thanks MP, now move out of the way so someone can help us sooner.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          CBS news just did a 5 minute bit on the Nature article this sunday evening. It was some pretty impressive PR for the cause. They illustrated how the combination works and said the rats regained 70% of function.

                          "The essense of Greatness is the Perception that courage is enough." R. Waldo Emerson
                          www.ableminded.net

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I just posted the abstract of the article in the following topic in the SCI (Animal) Research Forum[/url]. Wise.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              DA;

                              you kick ass!

                              But be nice to Fae she works hard.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X