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UCSD Scientists Demonstrate Use of 3D Printing with Stem Cells

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  • #16
    Originally posted by niallel View Post
    I'm not so sure that this is all about the stem cells or growth factors, its might be about the way that they are put into the cord so that axons align properly (or at least go in the right direction).

    Take a look at the pictures at the following link that shows the growth of the axons with the 3d printed scaffold and when the stem cells are put in without this method. You might be right that they won't align properly at each end, but isn't that what plasticity is all about? As long as there is a connection we can "learn" to make the connections work.
    Hey Niallel, yes I see your point, it sounds logical by the way they present it too... I'm still not convinced that this will ever work. by just cutting a minor incision to the cord to implant it will likely "disconect" good pathways, the cord can't even survive a bruise, an inflamation or even a minor swelling can kill a cord , I just not convinced that it can't be done without damaging the cord even more to insert the "implant"

    Too dangerous for human trials, over the years I learned not to believe everything the media publishes, no matter how much someone worships them by playing wannabe news anchor. Fundraising is all it matters to some and I find it discusting
    Last edited by Moe; 06-10-2019, 03:56 PM.
    "Talk without the support of action means nothing..."
    ― DaShanne Stokes

    ***Unite(D) to Fight Paralyses***

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    • #17
      ----
      Originally posted by niallel View Post
      So would you say the take away from all of this is that this is a much better way of doing scaffolding?

      A much better method of scaffold than all the others that have been tried over the last several decades. Each has had their own set of downfalls. This scaffold is unique in that each one is customized to an individual injury, channels help control the guidance of axons, it's stable and the scaffold is loaded with H9-NSC whereas other's have not been able to support the cells for a long period. Over 80% of the axons reach the distal site.

      They may or may not be using the best stem cells, and could enhance whatever they use with growth factors, but the real news is the 3d scaffolding?

      The stem cells they've settled on have been chosen after some 15 years of regeneration research and successes in this lab. So, yes, the real news is combining both an excellent scaffold and implanting the stem cells for a long lasting tissue integration. In essence, this strategy may be as good as any toward a regenerative chronic SCI therapy. (The InVivo scaffold is empty and only suited for acute injury). Perhaps this will make it over the finish line in the coming years.
      Last edited by GRAMMY; 06-10-2019, 11:55 PM.
      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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      • #18
        you still re-editing yesterday's responses??? it's not fair changing responses especially if they were allready responded...
        "Talk without the support of action means nothing..."
        ― DaShanne Stokes

        ***Unite(D) to Fight Paralyses***

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        • #19
          people can see the last editeddate in case you didn't knew...
          "Talk without the support of action means nothing..."
          ― DaShanne Stokes

          ***Unite(D) to Fight Paralyses***

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
            That's still all you've got?

            You're lonely, desperate for attention and come to CareCure to post silly redundant responses because you enjoy reading the media about the SCI research but don't understand any of it nor the biology of the cord. Or, is it the trolling you find entertaining?

            Repairing a spinal cord is more complicated than filling it with WD-40 and frosting it with glue. If it was easy, those defenseless rats you talk about could have strapped on new limbs with duct tape, saved their money and started wealthy rodent colonies instead.

            The article I just posted here in the SCI Nurse's thread from January was from the NIH Directors blog. Dr. Collins is not fundraising, he's reporting on research already funded by National Institute of Health in the U.S. He did not ask you for any Canadian money, so cry more.



            Actually, you DID ask. I'll continue to post articles/abstracts and comment on them whenever I please. You own nothing here.

            If you can't post anything but the same old butt hurt topics to be pissed off about, then stop trolling my posts and launching childish tantrums when I post articles at the forum. The blubbering and nutty insults you post in all the threads have grown tiresome. You've paid for nothing, contributed nothing and you get nothing. Nobody posting information here at carecure owes you anything. That includes me. Get over it.



            Someone is in dire need of a nap and dad burn discusting spell checker app...


            Why did you re-edited yesterday's entire conversation Grammy? Doesn't atch with anything in the original conversation anymore Not really fair... This wasn't about you, I don't understand the personal attacks that are irrelevant. Sorry about the typos you mentioned, my left eye is nearly blind plus I'm a quad, so I make mistakes sometimes, no need to tell me what to do, again nobody asked you.

            Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post

            Dr. Collins is not fundraising, he's reporting on research already funded by National Institute of Health in the U.S. He did not ask you for any Canadian money, so cry more.
            makes sense... "not fundraising cause it was allready funded..."
            Last edited by Moe; 06-11-2019, 10:41 AM.
            "Talk without the support of action means nothing..."
            ― DaShanne Stokes

            ***Unite(D) to Fight Paralyses***

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            • #21
              Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
              The stem cells they've settled on have been chosen after some 15 years of regeneration research and successes in this lab.
              Good point, but there are additional reasons for the use of these cells, such as the patents have expired. Could be a double edged sword - if its successful anyone can use them, but on the other side will anyone invest to take it further as there is no IP to protect. Although I suppose the IP for the scaffolding could negate this issue.

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              • #22
                big difference if the 15 year research was based on acute rats or with chronic humans though
                "Talk without the support of action means nothing..."
                ― DaShanne Stokes

                ***Unite(D) to Fight Paralyses***

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by moe View Post
                  you still re-editing yesterday's responses??? It's not fair changing responses especially if they were allready responded...
                  trolling and
                  http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by moe View Post
                    people can see the last editeddate in case you didn't knew...
                    thread crapping
                    http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by moe View Post
                      why did you re-edited yesterday's entire conversation grammy? Doesn't atch with anything in the original conversation anymore not really fair... This wasn't about you, i don't understand the personal attacks that are irrelevant. Sorry about the typos you mentioned, my left eye is nearly blind plus i'm a quad, so i make mistakes sometimes, no need to tell me what to do, again nobody asked you. makes sense... "not fundraising cause it was allready funded..."
                      is a blind mans
                      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by moe View Post
                        big difference if the 15 year research was based on acute rats or with chronic humans though
                        biggest attribute.
                        http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by niallel View Post
                          Good point, but there are additional reasons for the use of these cells, such as the patents have expired. Could be a double edged sword - if its successful anyone can use them, but on the other side will anyone invest to take it further as there is no IP to protect. Although I suppose the IP for the scaffolding could negate this issue.
                          For now, the work is still in proof of principle with rodent and primate. It's not to say they are ready for final animal testing to head to the FDA with. I would imagine the IP details will all be worked out if the lab results give them all the right go ahead signals. Cells can be easily manipulated. It's early in the process of loading scaffolds with cells to get functional results. It's worth keeping abreast of their developments. This is one of the best SCI labs in the US.
                          http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                            For now, the work is still in proof of principle with rodent and primate. It's not to say they are ready for final animal testing to head to the FDA with. I would imagine the IP details will all be worked out if the lab results give them all the right go ahead signals. Cells can be easily manipulated. It's early in the process of loading scaffolds with cells to get functional results. It's worth keeping abreast of their developments. This is one of the best SCI labs in the US.
                            unfortunately, nothing said here has proved anything.Just personal assumptions. Thanks anyways.
                            "Talk without the support of action means nothing..."
                            ― DaShanne Stokes

                            ***Unite(D) to Fight Paralyses***

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Moe View Post
                              unfortunately, nothing said here has proved anything.Just personal assumptions. Thanks anyways.
                              and public spectacle.
                              http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                              • #30
                                Back to the original topic by SCI Nurse, I see reality in 3D printing cell matching organs for transplanting, but only the ones that do heal such as skin tissue, heart, ear, lungs, nose, eyes....these were allready transplanted by organ donors way before 3D printing... Spinal cord tissue if different, it may be 3D printed but then what.... how to insert unhealable tissue or 'scaforld' without further damaging the existing one? just one nerve fiber disruption can paralyse the rest of the body. Makes more sense to me if just using the growth syrop alone to the existing cord to repair itseft
                                "Talk without the support of action means nothing..."
                                ― DaShanne Stokes

                                ***Unite(D) to Fight Paralyses***

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