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Technology and therapy help individuals with chronic spinal cord injuries take steps

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  • Technology and therapy help individuals with chronic spinal cord injuries take steps

    Check this out.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0924112757.htm

  • #2
    Hype.

    Remember these 4? Same study, is it not?

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    • #3
      Impossible to tell from your photo what study these men were in, but the study sited above had female members, so certainly not the same subjects if it was the same study.

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
        Impossible to tell from your photo what study these men were in, but the study sited above had female members, so certainly not the same subjects if it was the same study.


        (KLD)

        Its the follow on study from the picture. From the article:
        This latest study builds on initial research published in The Lancet in 2011 that documented the success of the first epidural stimulation participant, Rob Summers, who recovered a number of motor functions as a result of the intervention. Three years later, a study published in the medical journal Brain discussed how epidural stimulation of the spinal cord allowed Summers and three other young men who had been paralyzed for years to move their legs. Later research from UofL demonstrated this technology improved blood pressure regulation.

        This study will run and run and at the end we won't have it. It should be given out to everyone today, but no they need to do more and more research.

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        • #5
          Why is there so much skepticism towards epi stim? I understand Hakermas implanted stim is still old medtronic device but Edgertons stim is coming to Chicago this year to RIC for UE or early next year.

          Even if it helps to recover some hand function and trunk stability for quads and some functions for paras isn't that great? It's better than what we have now.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wesmaister View Post
            Why is there so much skepticism towards epi stim? I understand Hakermas implanted stim is still old medtronic device but Edgertons stim is coming to Chicago this year to RIC for UE or early next year.

            Even if it helps to recover some hand function and trunk stability for quads and some functions for paras isn't that great? It's better than what we have now.
            There is zero skepticism from me. The problem I have is the technology is there today and why don't we have it?

            You hit the nail on the head I agree completely. So what if whats out there is an old device, who cares if it wasn't made for SCI? It does something today, so lets have it.
            There is nothing to stop them, improving and improving and releasing new products - its how the rest of the world works.

            Its like Steve Jobs saying, that iPhone 1 is ok, but we aren't going to release anything until we have the iPhone X.
            This is the difference between researchers and the real world. They are continually looking for the perfect thing, refining and refining - but perfection will never come, only improvements.

            You summed it up perfectly:
            It's better than what we have now.
            Last edited by niallel; 09-28-2018, 12:56 PM.

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            • #7
              i was down the bronx VA and saw they are doing research on non invasive cervical electrical stimulation, trying to activate new pathways from outside the body.

              http://www.scirc.org/neurorehabilitation.html
              cauda equina

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                Impossible to tell from your photo what study these men were in, but the study sited above had female members, so certainly not the same subjects if it was the same study.

                (KLD)
                The photo I posted is of the first 4 individuals that took part in the study many years ago. All that time and none of those guys have ditched their wheelchairs that I'm aware of. So now they have some new guinea pigs to help keep the donations coming in. The plan is to continue this for several more years. Something like 4 subjects per year until they've reached 36 subjects. I don't really care to hear about the new patients. Let's hear more about why the first 4. How far are they able to walk now? What's their sensation like now?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Barrington314mx View Post
                  The photo I posted is of the first 4 individuals that took part in the study many years ago. All that time and none of those guys have ditched their wheelchairs that I'm aware of. So now they have some new guinea pigs to help keep the donations coming in. The plan is to continue this for several more years. Something like 4 subjects per year until they've reached 36 subjects. I don't really care to hear about the new patients. Let's hear more about why the first 4. How far are they able to walk now? What's their sensation like now?
                  Good questions

                  Paolo
                  In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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