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Has anyone tried "Lion's Mane" for cognitive enhancement and/or nerve damage?

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  • Has anyone tried "Lion's Mane" for cognitive enhancement and/or nerve damage?

    The mushroom appears to have many positive attributes.
    Thoughts?

    Lion's Mane Mushrooms for Nerve Damage? - Ask Dr. Weil
    "Transverse myelitis (TM) is a neurological disorder that stems from inflammation across a segment of the spinal cord. The inflammation can damage or destroy myelin, the fatty substance that insulates nerve cell?"

    https://www.drweil.com/health-wellne...-nerve-damage/

  • #2
    No, but am definitely interested! Did you read this column? http:///forum/showthread.php?65685-e...rve-growth-Jan

    Originally posted by Chaz19 View Post
    The mushroom appears to have many positive attributes.
    Thoughts?

    Lion's Mane Mushrooms for Nerve Damage? - Ask Dr. Weil
    "Transverse myelitis (TM) is a neurological disorder that stems from inflammation across a segment of the spinal cord. The inflammation can damage or destroy myelin, the fatty substance that insulates nerve cell?"

    https://www.drweil.com/health-wellne...-nerve-damage/

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by FellowHawkeye View Post
      No, but am definitely interested! Did you read this column? http:///forum/showthread.php?65685-e...rve-growth-Jan

      Wise's reply appears to be very conservative; he may have some information that we are not privy to- that is concerning. The publications over the last two years look very positive. If it is a culinary mushroom and if it is conservatively ingested; I cannot find a solid rationale to avoid it. I've taken cranberry extract and oregano for years to combat Pseudomonas and E. coli.

      Mushrooms are known for having extremely potent benefits and harmful effects. I don't have a lot of knowledge in this area, but I can think of penicillin mold easily.

      It is the genus that may predate animal life. Regardless- if anyone has any access to college databases - please conduct a quick search. I lost my access a year or two ago.

      I'll post publications as I find them.

      https://scholar.google.com/scholar?h...27s+mane+neuro
      Last edited by Chaz19; 11-22-2017, 07:06 PM. Reason: typos

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Chaz19 View Post
        Wise's reply appears to be aggressively conservative; he may have some information that we are not privy to- that is concerning. The publications over the last two years look very positive. If it is a culinary mushroom and if it is conservatively ingested; I cannot find a solid rationale to avoid it. I've taken cranberry extract and oregano for years to combat Pseudomonas and E. coli.

        Mushrooms are known for having extremely potent benefits and harmful effects. I don't have a lot of knowledge in this area, but I can think of penicillin mold easily.

        It is the genus that may predate animal life. Regardless- if anyone has any access to college databases - please conduct a quick search. I lost my access a year or two ago.

        I'll post publications as I find them.

        https://scholar.google.com/scholar?h...27s+mane+neuro

        Aggressively conservative sounds oxymoronic.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by gjnl View Post
          Aggressively conservative sounds oxymoronic.
          You are right. My bad. I was exhausted and it was an improper word choice. I changed the word for you.

          If you have any information about Lion's Mane– I would be interested. Care to comment upon on the publications?

          I rarely visit this site, because of the negative tone. You reinforce negativity.

          The purpose was to convey the fact that Dr. Young's advice sounds like a warning.

          Comment


          • #6
            My husband and I bought some after the reading that article on Dr. Weil's website awhile back. We didn't stick with it because it was expensive (about $120/month, if we both took the recommended amount). If you're curious and can afford it, I don't think there'd be any harm in trying it out.
            MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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            • #7
              Thank you, Bonnette.

              That is expensive. I am curious and I would want to start a regimen for a minimum of six months to a year. I wish I had the funds to experiment. I'm also hesitant to buy mushrooms or even garlic supplements from China because to unregulated markets (there could be heavy metals and toxins in the soil).

              "Obtained data revealed the normal growth of the nerve and glial cells with extract at cultivating. No pathologic or toxic action of the extract has been found. The cell ultrastructure was intact and similar to that observed in vivo. The process of myelination in the presence of the extract began earlier as compared to controls and was characterised by a higher rate. Thus, extract of H. erinaceus promoted normal development of cultivated cerebellar cells and demonstrated a regulatory effect on the process of myelin genesis process in vitro."

              Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12675022

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              • #8
                We researched the companies producing this supplement and went with freeze-dried Host Defense organic Lion's Mane. The company raises certified organic mushrooms and their supplements are manufactured and distributed by the parent firm (Fungi Perfecti) in Olympia, Washington. They have a very informative website, http://hostdefense.com and a good customer support team to answer questions.

                We bought two 60-capsule bottles at our local health food store (at the recommended two caps per day, we splurged so that each of us could have a month's trial). A single bottle cost $56 in 2014. We figured it was best to pay more and get a safe product, though we ended up needing that money for urgent home repairs. Now I'm thinking of trying it again, thanks for reminding me about Lion's Mane!
                MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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                • #9
                  Chaz, I just checked Amazon and the price has come way down - $44 for a 120-cap bottle! Now I'm definitely going to try it again.
                  MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
                    Chaz, I just checked Amazon and the price has come way down - $44 for a 120-cap bottle! Now I'm definitely going to try it again.
                    Thank you for the recommendation. I have it on my wish list and if you happen to keep records. Please share your notes ? I be interested to see and hear about dosage, length of application, efficacy ECT.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You take two caps per day, either with food or on an empty stomach - doesn't matter which. We didn't take it long enough to see results, and I did not keep notes. My husband's friend with diabetic neuropathy said it helped him right away. The only negatives I've found online are concerned with people who have a mushroom allergy or asthma. There haven't been many studies, so most of the reports are anecdotal.
                      MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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