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Paralyzed man surprises scientists by standing and moving on his own

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  • #46
    A couple general comments on this thread -
    1. The Harkema lab has collaborated with others at the University of Louisville to objectively measure changes in bladder function after both locomotor training, and epidural stimulation. No papers have been published to my knowledge, but there have been poster presentations at different conferences on the subject, including these two I saw at the Society for Neuroscience conference in 2016, where they did full-blown urodynamic exams on people with complete SCI:
    http://www.abstractsonline.com/pp8/i...sentation/2813
    http://www.abstractsonline.com/pp8/i...entation/29965

    The 2017 Society for Neuroscience meeting is just around the corner. You can search for abstracts by keyword like "bladder" or "spinal cord injury" here:
    http://www.abstractsonline.com/pp8/#!/4376
    Any keyword you search for will likely come up with thousands of results, so make sure to narrow your search by using the "Session type" tab on the left side of the screen. Alternatively, you can search for presentations and posters by author.


    2. It is no surprise it has taken years of training for someone with an SCI to re-gain voluntary function, however insignificant it may seem. Humans are born with very immature nervous systems - think of how many years it takes a baby to eventually learn to walk and control their own bowels and bladders. After a spinal cord injury, you lose neural tissue, and then the nervous system re-organizes, sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse - either way, you basically have a new nervous system that you're starting from scratch with. If you want to re-gain bladder control and the ability to control movement, it is going to take at least as long as it takes a child to master those behaviors. The fact that any kind of voluntary function was regained at all, on any timeline, without replacing cells lost to injury in the spinal cord, is pretty amazing. I appreciate that some people think this function may be meaningless for real-world scenarios, but the science is nothing short of groundbreaking, and it shows us that we're moving in the right direction.

    3. Dustin Shillcox has also shown how he incorporates using the epidural stim into his every day life (you have to sit through some inspiration porn to see that in this video):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glDN7P0IkmQ

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    • #47
      TOMSONITE;;
      "I appreciate that some people think this function may be meaningless for real-world scenarios, but the science is nothing short of groundbreaking, and it shows us that we're moving in the right direction."

      SORRY, those ungrateful indignant sci expecting some semblance of normalcy

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Tim C. View Post
        TOMSONITE;;
        "I appreciate that some people think this function may be meaningless for real-world scenarios, but the science is nothing short of groundbreaking, and it shows us that we're moving in the right direction."

        SORRY, those ungrateful indignant sci expecting some semblance of normalcy
        I'm sorry if I wasn't clear with what I was trying to say.

        The first time the Wright brothers successfully flew an airplane, the flight lasted 10 seconds and reached a maximum height of 8 feet off the ground. Should they have given up then, due to a flight like that having zero application for the real world? Or are we all glad they kept going, and they and others developed that idea?

        Again, I understand that just being able to kick your legs around and/or having limited ability to stand does not give one a sense of normalcy. But like it or not, from a sheer scientific perspective, these results are groundbreaking. Voluntary function of any amount has never been restored this far out of a complete, chronic spinal cord injury.

        Do you believe, based on the results of this last paper, this whole line of research should be shut down and abandoned?

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        • #49
          Originally posted by tomsonite View Post
          I'm sorry if I wasn't clear with what I was trying to say.

          The first time the Wright brothers successfully flew an airplane, the flight lasted 10 seconds and reached a maximum height of 8 feet off the ground. Should they have given up then, due to a flight like that having zero application for the real world? Or are we all glad they kept going, and they and others developed that idea?

          Again, I understand that just being able to kick your legs around and/or having limited ability to stand does not give one a sense of normalcy. But like it or not, from a sheer scientific perspective, these results are groundbreaking. Voluntary function of any amount has never been restored this far out of a complete, chronic spinal cord injury.

          Do you believe, based on the results of this last paper, this whole line of research should be shut down and abandoned?

          Valid
          "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

          "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


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