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Paralyzed Men Move Legs with New Non-Invasive Spinal Cord Stimulation - NIH Study

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  • Paralyzed Men Move Legs with New Non-Invasive Spinal Cord Stimulation - NIH Study

    WTF WHERE IS THIS GOING?

    http://www.newswise.com/articles/par...ion-nih-study2

    Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. This expands to nine the number of completely paralyzed individuals who have achieved voluntary movement while receiving spinal stimulation, though this is the first time the stimulation was delivered non-invasively. Previously it was delivered via an electrical stimulation device surgically implanted on the spinal cord.

    http://www.spinalcordinjury-paralysis.org/blogs/18/2547

    Now comes the publication in the journal Neurotrauma of results from Edgerton?s group at UCLA testing two kinds of non-surgical approaches: transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation, applied to the skin; and a prescription drug, buspirone.

    In the new paper, five subjects, all with motor complete spinal cord injuries, were shown to improve voluntary ?locomotor-like? function after the stimulation experiments. They also showed improvement ? with no stimulation ? after taking buspirone (Buspar) twice a day during the final four weeks of the study. This drug is often prescribed to treat anxiety by activating serotonin receptors in the brain. These same receptors are present on nerves in the spinal cord; earlier studies showed that buspirone can generate locomotion in mice with spinal cord injuries.
    ^^(A)^^

  • #2
    Here is the latest on non-surgical simulation:

    https://www.nibib.nih.gov/news-event...ve-their-hands

    There was a thread on this about a week ago http:///forum/showthread.php?254003-...ve-Their-Hands

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    • #3
      I know research has been on going with implanted electrodes but the study I sited was using non invasive external electrodes on the skin. No surgery involved plus a drug to enhance the effects and still they got results.
      ^^(A)^^

      Comment


      • #4
        Edgerton's group has been doing the transcutaneous work for about five years now and has published several papers on it along with several patent applications and at least one patent awarded. His company is looking to launch commercial products as soon as they can get FDA approval.
        T3 complete since Sept 2015.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by darty View Post
          I know research has been on going with implanted electrodes but the study I sited was using non invasive external electrodes on the skin. No surgery involved plus a drug to enhance the effects and still they got results.
          The link that I gave above also about non-invasive simulation that had them move their hands. This is huge also but it did not get much track on this site. This is very big having non-surgical simulators and people move their hands and they did it so quickly.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by scimike View Post
            The link that I gave above also about non-invasive simulation that had them move their hands. This is huge also but it did not get much track on this site. This is very big having non-surgical simulators and people move their hands and they did it so quickly.
            Is the epidural stimulation not invasive? From my understanding the epi stim is done with surgically implanted electrodes which means invasive. While the transcutaneous is the non-invasive one, which means "through the skin" and is done by placing the electrodes on the skin.
            Anyway, I don't care what way is being done as long as it works.

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            • #7
              This work has been discussed at length. Edgerton's team started with implanted electrodes and that made headlines, but he's since focused on transcutaneous stimulation - i.e. electrodes on the skin; no surgery required.
              T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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              • #8
                If Dr. Edgerton has been able to get patients to move their paralyzed limbs using trans-cutaneous stimulation (No surgery, no stem cells, no injections, etc..), what is stopping us patients from benefiting from this research? Does Dr. Edgerton need FDA approval to bring this solution to the market? This is a bit puzzling.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Edgerton's company is in the process of raising funding for commercial devices and FDA approval process. We're likely 2 years from FDA approval at which point you'll be able to get av Rx and then use these devices as part of your PT.
                  T3 complete since Sept 2015.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Does this work for hand function? Anyone try one? I see them on Ebay from time to time.

                    http://aim2walk.ca/bioness/

                    http://www.bioness.com/Products/H200..._Paralysis.php
                    ^^(A)^^

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                    • #11
                      That's a totally different technology. It's basically FES for certain hand functions. FES can retrain they brain after a stroke (this is referred to as neuroplasticity), but there's no good data showing recovery after SCI.

                      Now one theory is that a system like this could be used in tandem with the NRT stimulator to retrain the lower spinal cord to work with the reduced signals from and to there brain. Edgerton and NRT have shown hand function recovery in two quad subjects.
                      T3 complete since Sept 2015.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mize View Post
                        Edgerton's company is in the process of raising funding for commercial devices and FDA approval process. We're likely 2 years from FDA approval at which point you'll be able to get av Rx and then use these devices as part of your PT.
                        Thank you for the update Mize, my question was since this procedure seems to use technology that is non invasive and similar to existing devices such as the E-Stim devices used by some patients to stimulate their muscles, why is FDA approval required and why is it going to take so long to get it. Any chance of spreading the trials taking place now to other locations any time soon? Is Dr. Edgerton open to cooperating with other doctors to setup multiple trial sites and spread access to this procedure to a larger patient population?

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                        • #13
                          They likely already have a list of sites ready to go once the prototypes are built. Also, even though the basic circuitry is similar to FES, the complexity and way in which it's used will require FDA approval. The good news about this is that I believe that, unlike FES, this stim technology will have to be covered by insurances.
                          T3 complete since Sept 2015.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mize View Post
                            They likely already have a list of sites ready to go once the prototypes are built. Also, even though the basic circuitry is similar to FES, the complexity and way in which it's used will require FDA approval. The good news about this is that I believe that, unlike FES, this stim technology will have to be covered by insurances.
                            What about setting up trials in foreign countries, how feasible do you think that would be. I am sorry to ask all these questions, but I am 3.5 years post injury, T3/T4 incomplete asia B but no movement or skin sensation below level of injury, and from what I read on the forums, in a couple of years, there won't be much left of my body to salvage. This research so far seems to be the best bet to at least stabilize people in my condition if not recover sensation and function until something else comes along. Would be great if additional trial sites could be setup in foreign countries (I live in Dubai) to bypass FDA approval and make this therapy available to people early on.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Did they say that even in Quads they stimulate the lower spine T or L?
                              ^^(A)^^

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