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The Wroclaw Walk Again Project

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    The Wroclaw Walk Again Project

    "The Wrocław Walk Again project is a continuation of the innovative experimental therapy involving reconstruction of patients severed spinal cords, using their own olfactory glial cells from the olfactory bulb as well as implants from peripheral nerves. The first operation of its kind was performed in 2012..."

    https://walk-again-project.org/#/en/project

    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

    #2
    Seems like some good shit

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      #3
      Please see this link, before you make any assessment of my work.

      http://www.bbc.com/news/health-35660621

      Dr Pawel Tabakow, leader of the 'Wroclaw Walk Again Project'

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        #4
        Thank you for coming here on CareCure Dr Tabakow.

        I would have two questions:

        1 - In the upcoming patients will you remove one olfactory bulb as you have done with Darek Fridyka or you have worked out an easier/less invasive surgery?

        2 - When are you hoping to do the surgery on the first patient?

        Thank you

        Paolo
        In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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          #5
          Dear Dr Tabakow what about chronic lumbar injury patients?

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            #6
            Good shit means good stuff, all positive vibes from me

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              #7
              Good vibes from me too! Best wishes!

              Comment


                #8
                This is interesting:

                "Functional Repair of Rat Corticospinal Tract Lesions Does Not Require Permanent Survival of an Immunoincompatible Transplant"

                Authors: Li, Ying; Li, Daqing; Raisman, Geoffrey

                ..." This raises the possibility that in the future a protocol of temporary immunoprotection might allow for the use of the larger available numbers of immunoincompatible allografted cells or cell lines, which would avoid the need for removing a patient’s olfactory bulb."

                Link

                I hope soon there will be a way to even avoid the need of implanting cells.
                Last edited by paolocipolla; 27 Mar 2016, 5:19 PM.
                In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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                  #9
                  I want to participate in The Wroclaw Walk Again Project, how can i join? Contact me please vlad-voilo93@mail.ru i'm from Ukraine.

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                    #10
                    http://naukawpolsce.pap.pl/aktualnos...-uniwersytecie
                    https://wroclaw.wyborcza.pl/wroclaw/...kregowego.html

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                      #11
                      https://scitrials.org/trial/NCT03933072

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by paolocipolla View Post
                        I hope soon there will be a way to even avoid the need of implanting cells.
                        I personally believe it's already here with transcutaneous stimulation. It has been shown to work. This doesn't seem to get too much press here though. We shouldn't rule this out. Something is happening internally via stimulation if function is returning, not just through pattern generators but through the brain communicating with neural circuitry below the level of the injury site. If transcutaneous is as good as (or equivalent to) epidural stimulation, then we have a non-surgical approach, which I think is ready for clinics/hospitals - going beyond endless trials.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by niallel View Post
                          I really agree with you. And I am hoping it becomes available sooner than later on a wide-scale basis for people. Especially people with incomplete injuries that maybe a good push in this direction can help as opposed to needing the cells.

                          I think a big part of the problem is availability and length of time rehabbing. Doing something 3 days a week for an hour a day for a couple of months is really a drop in the bucket. If we are going to get people really moving, we need to be walking more than we are sitting, getting our asses zapped

                          I'm about to start a trial over the next few weeks that I'm hoping really shows some results. But even if it does, it will be minimal because it's only 3 days a week for 5 weeks...

                          If I feel stronger, walk better, improve in places, what next? Wait another 5 years until it becomes more available???

                          It's a bit disheartening. If things are helping people they need a way to get it to the people quicker so they can get their quality of life back. That is why I am really liking what I'm seeing out of Japan in letting the people choose to get procedures done that might not be fully approved...

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