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Brain Computer Interface for Quadriplegia and Paraplegia Improvement

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  • Brain Computer Interface for Quadriplegia and Paraplegia Improvement

    Christina King PhD, researcher from UCLA and UC at Irvine, discusses the Brain/Computer Interface to provide Muscular Stimulation to improve the conditions of Paraplegia, for patients to engage in a improved state of locomotion and walking along with a panel that includes a few neurologists. Christina has her PhD in brain computer interfaces and is researching mobile health platforms for improving movement after neurological injury at the UCLA Wireless Health Institute.

    LINK
    http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

  • #2
    If a solution involves touching my brain, then I'm out.

    Anyone think that they would take a chance?

    If its for motor only, why wouldn't an external system be a better use of resources?
    Surely exoskeletons are going to be faster to develop and have a lot less risk than messing with the brain?

    Sometimes I think research is being done for research purposes only.
    Last edited by PleaseBeReasonable; 01-29-2016, 10:12 PM. Reason: Wanted to explain more of my thinking

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    • #3
      I would give anything to move my legs around ... If it got rid of my ever-present foot wounds, totally worth it.
      Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

      T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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      • #4
        Wouldn't it be useless without sensation though?
        I think the reason people without a spinal injury don't get pressure sores is that their body tells their brain they need to move.
        If you don't have the sensation telling you to move, will you remember?

        I remember being in rehab and they told me I should lift and move my myself every 15 minutes to release the pressure.
        Like I can remember to do this.
        Regardless when I'm asleep that can't happen.

        Don't get me wrong, I would love to have motor so I can walk. But if its motor only, then I think I'd get an exoskeleton vs a brain implant.

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        • #5
          Trying to figure out who are, newly registered? lol
          Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

          T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lynnifer View Post
            Trying to figure out who are, newly registered? lol

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            • #7
              ah, ok I get it. If you aren't complete and have sensation it would be worth it?

              Sorry was just thinking about completes.

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              • #8
                Here is thread on jumping the damaged area for people interested in understanding more about this strategy:

                https://www.carecure.net/forum/showt...light=computer

                I still believe we should focus on finding a biological cure and leave this approaches aside because it will take long time before you can make it work decently for people and a natural recovery of function would still be much better and not more distant in the future IMO.

                Also consider that for people who have lost the second motor neuron regeneration is the only option.
                In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lynnifer View Post
                  I would give anything to move my legs around ... If it got rid of my ever-present foot wounds, totally worth it.
                  Other labs are also pushing forward in the field and secured funding.

                  http://motherboard.vice.com/read/brain-implant-that-could-reanimate-paralyzed-limbs-secures-16m-in-funding

                  http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PleaseBeReasonable View Post
                    If a solution involves touching my brain, then I'm out.

                    Anyone think that they would take a chance?

                    If its for motor only, why wouldn't an external system be a better use of resources?
                    Surely exoskeletons are going to be faster to develop and have a lot less risk than messing with the brain?

                    Sometimes I think research is being done for research purposes only.
                    I agree. Where are the funds for this research coming from? NSF is part of healthcare or....?

                    @Grammy I'm still interested know about the funding mechanisms of spinal cord injury researchers receive. At the state level, I've been involved in this process ? but we are still funding basic research. Please enlighten me to how the federal government is disbursing funds and ways we can organize so that we can get an increase like $350 million like ALS.

                    When does SCI secondary complications begin to be classified as terminal? Too many of us have been taken early.

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                    • #11
                      National Science Foundation (NSF) : LINK is entirely a different federally funded area of science that researchers can apply for grants.

                      The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 "to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense" With an annual budget of $7.5 billion (FY 2016), we are the funding source for approximately 24 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America's colleges and universities. In many fields such as mathematics, computer science and the social sciences, NSF is the major source of federal backing.

                      We fulfill our mission chiefly by issuing limited-term grants -- currently about 12,000 new awards per year, with an average duration of three years -- to fund specific research proposals that have been judged the most promising by a rigorous and objective merit-review system. Most of these awards go to individuals or small groups of investigators. Others provide funding for research centers, instruments and facilities that allow scientists, engineers and students to work at the outermost frontiers of knowledge.

                      This post about "Brain computer interface" would definitely fall within this description for funding. They don't fund medicine here at the NSF in the same way as the National Institute of Health (NIH) does. People tend to mix apples and oranges on these two organizations. They fund entirely different areas of "science". Grant money with the NSF in no way takes away from an NIH grant.

                      __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________

                      This is a video about the National Institute of Health (NIH) specifically the NINDS Program Director, Lyn Jakeman explaining biological SCI funding and all the various different areas of the NIH that fund projects for spinal cord injury.



                      https://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/congressional_testimony/ninds_fy_2016_cj.htm

                      You do not see a whole lot of national lobbying efforts from small non-profit orgs and charities for various reasons. One important one is that they're quite limited due to IRS rules about influencing without losing their tax exempt status. It's a very fine line. Without that tax exempt status, you probably wouldn't see much in the way of SCI organizations trying to help out. LINK.

                      Last edited by GRAMMY; 02-06-2016, 12:15 AM.
                      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                        Could this help also people with cauda equina injury (second motor neuron damage)?
                        In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by paolocipolla View Post
                          Could this help also people with cauda equina injury (second motor neuron damage)?
                          Probably not. Anything that involves stimulating nerves or muscles needs an intact lower motor neuron. Without an intact lower motor neuron, the neuromuscular junction itself must be stimulated, which is a vastly different process than regular FES, transcutaneous, or implanted stimulation.

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                          • #14
                            Cauda equine is not a typical diagnosis, developing in only 4 to 7 out of every 10,000 to 100,000 patients, and is more likely to occur proximally.[7][8][9] Disc herniation is reportedly the most common cause of CES, and it is thought that 1 to 2% of all surgical disc herniation cases result in CES.

                            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cauda_equina_syndrome
                            http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tomsonite View Post
                              Probably not. Anything that involves stimulating nerves or muscles needs an intact lower motor neuron. Without an intact lower motor neuron, the neuromuscular junction itself must be stimulated, which is a vastly different process than regular FES, transcutaneous, or implanted stimulation.
                              Thanks for the clarification, is it correct that anyone with an injury below T10 may have damaged the lower motor neuron?
                              I believe Wise has explained that before, but I could find where he posted about that.
                              In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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