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Robot Millionaire Takes a Shot at Fixing Severed Spinal Cords

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  • Robot Millionaire Takes a Shot at Fixing Severed Spinal Cords

    On a cloudy Wednesday morning in the Tokyo suburb of Tsukuba, Yoshiyuki Sankai points excitedly to a slide of severed spinal cords. They belong to rats, and he's used cell technology to help reconnect the nerves.

    LINK:
    http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

  • #2
    Thumbs up to him for blending the ReWalk design concept with a Star Wars Stormtrooper costume:
    http://thegreatgeekmanual.com/blog/cyberdyne-hal-5
    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012...n_2004656.html


    Cyberdyne was one of 3 robotics companies to go public last year along with ReWalk Robotics and Esko Bionics. The Bloomberg article is written for the potential investor. Japanese subsidies for regenerative medical research seem similar to U.S. subsidies for clean energy.
    What distinguishes this CEO's robotics company from the other two? It's his plan to combine a regenerative therapy with the robotic assisted movement.
    Last edited by 2drwhofans; 09-05-2015, 06:57 PM.

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    • #3
      Forbes has his net worth at $1 billion.
      The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
      --General George Patton

      Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
      ––Paul Nussbaum
      usc87.blogspot.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I imagine the full body suit will be used in manufacturing, industry and off loading weight during heavy lifting. I think the lower half suit shown during their gait training is the one they would most likely use for medical purposes. It'll be interesting to see what cells he plans to utilize in his proposals. The changes in regulations in Japan will surely make things move a bit faster over there.
        http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
          The changes in regulations in Japan will surely make things move a bit faster over there.
          In Japan, being fast and being first sometimes doesn't work out well:

          http://www.theguardian.com/science/2...scientists-lie

          http://www3.riken.jp/stap/e/c13document5.pdf

          I agree with you that the robotic suits are gong to find their niche in reducing work-related injuries ( or maybe reducing workers ).
          Last edited by 2drwhofans; 09-05-2015, 07:58 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PN View Post
            Forbes has his net worth at $1 billion.
            Wow. Interesting! I see that now...

            "Keys to the company’s growth are winning more regulatory approvals for HALs as medical devices, which would enable insurance coverage, and expanding the use of the technology. One use could be health monitoring to catch, for example, the predictors of strokes. Germany has already approved the robot legs for treating injured workers and allows workers’ compensation insurance to cover the cost.
            Sankai expects U.S. Food & Drug Administration approval this year for medical use. With the end of clinical trials, the company filed an application last month to use HALs for medical purposes in Japan and could gain approval this year. HAL is now used in Japan for nonmedical purposes only. Cyberdyne bases its production at its research and development center and headquarters in Tsukuba, but it plans to build a plant in Fukushima Prefecture next year".

            http://www.forbes.com/sites/jsimms/2015/04/01/yoshiyuki-sankais-cyborgs-serve-japans-sick-and-elderly/
            http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Neurologic-Controlled Exoskeletal Neuro-Rehibilitation was presented by Thomas Schildhauer, MD at the Seattle Science Foundation and Swedish Neuroscience Institute Grand Rounds. Dr. Schildhauer discusses the exciting developments in the use of the Cyberdyne robotic exoskeleton, HAL, in treatment of acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

              LINK
              http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                2
                Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                Neurologic-Controlled Exoskeletal Neuro-Rehibilitation was presented by Thomas Schildhauer, MD at the Seattle Science Foundation and Swedish Neuroscience Institute Grand Rounds. Dr. Schildhauer discusses the exciting developments in the use of the Cyberdyne robotic exoskeleton, HAL, in treatment of acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

                LINK
                Concept is very viable! I know it's true from my experience. Only with gait treadmill training just twice per week (40 min walk) I was able to drop weight support from 75 kilos down to almost zero and my legs producing some good steps. If I have chance to increase frequency of the training or to use HAL I feel I would progress even more.
                I think combining HAL or similar (Keeogo in USA) with excessive Gait and than just walker high frequency training is way to go.
                www.MiracleofWalk.com

                Miracles are not contrary to nature, but only contrary
                to what we know about nature
                Saint Augustine

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by comad View Post
                  2

                  Concept is very viable! I know it's true from my experience. Only with gait treadmill training just twice per week (40 min walk) I was able to drop weight support from 75 kilos down to almost zero and my legs producing some good steps. If I have chance to increase frequency of the training or to use HAL I feel I would progress even more.
                  I think combining HAL or similar (Keeogo in USA) with excessive Gait and than just walker high frequency training is way to go.
                  Is the Keeogo a closed loop system like HAL?
                  http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                    Is the Keeogo a closed loop system like HAL?
                    Not quite sure what closed loop means - I know this - Keeogo robotic legs got sensors
                    and recognize even slight effort of getting up or stepping forward and assisting in that effort,
                    also helping with balance. More about how it's works here.
                    I was observing 19 years girl with very impaired walking, how she has improved tremendously using
                    Keeogo Robotic Legs and combining ZeroG gait walking support system.
                    www.MiracleofWalk.com

                    Miracles are not contrary to nature, but only contrary
                    to what we know about nature
                    Saint Augustine

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                      Neurologic-Controlled Exoskeletal Neuro-Rehibilitation was presented by Thomas Schildhauer, MD at the Seattle Science Foundation and Swedish Neuroscience Institute Grand Rounds. Dr. Schildhauer discusses the exciting developments in the use of the Cyberdyne robotic exoskeleton, HAL, in treatment of acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

                      LINK
                      This looks like it could help a lot of incompletes achieve some degree of mobility. From what I understand from the presentation of the HAL therapy, all of the eight chronic incomplete subjects in the pilot study and 35 out of 50 chronic patients who were treated later -- all of whom had already been through quite extensive conventional rehab -- achieved significant functional improvement with the HAL therapy, so that after a period of training with the HAL robot they were able to do some level of functional walking, with or without assistive devices, WITHOUT the robot. Question for those of you who know more about neuroplasticity than I do: Do I understand correctly that the people who regained function thanks to the HAL therapy did so because the robot enabled them to repeatedly perform actions that they had been unable to perform before, but that became possible with the robot, leading to increase in muscle size and strength (because they were finally exercising previously unexercised muscles), peripheral neuron sprouting and the creation of a feedback loop? Does training with the HAL give better results because this feedback loop includes actions that the person was not able to perform naturally but that he now has the chance to practise and reinforce? Is this the big difference that HAL therapy is able to offer compared to "conventional" intensive rehab therapy, where the person is generally only able to reinforce what he can already do? Thanks for your replies.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mamadavid View Post
                        This looks like it could help a lot of incompletes achieve some degree of mobility. From what I understand from the presentation of the HAL therapy, all of the eight chronic incomplete subjects in the pilot study and 35 out of 50 chronic patients who were treated later -- all of whom had already been through quite extensive conventional rehab -- achieved significant functional improvement with the HAL therapy, so that after a period of training with the HAL robot they were able to do some level of functional walking, with or without assistive devices, WITHOUT the robot. Question for those of you who know more about neuroplasticity than I do: Do I understand correctly that the people who regained function thanks to the HAL therapy did so because the robot enabled them to repeatedly perform actions that they had been unable to perform before, but that became possible with the robot, leading to increase in muscle size and strength (because they were finally exercising previously unexercised muscles), peripheral neuron sprouting and the creation of a feedback loop? Does training with the HAL give better results because this feedback loop includes actions that the person was not able to perform naturally but that he now has the chance to practise and reinforce? Is this the big difference that HAL therapy is able to offer compared to "conventional" intensive rehab therapy, where the person is generally only able to reinforce what he can already do? Thanks for your replies.
                        Yes, mamadavid, I think you have the presentation interpreted pretty darn close. The closed loop system appears to have great potential to assist an incomplete injury. A colleague did check with the company very recent and they do hope to break into the US market as soon as they can. (Currently, they're in Japan and Germany). This will be quite a unique system as compared to the others so it's worth watching their progress in marketing it.
                        http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                        • #13
                          The Japanese "HAL" robot by Cyberdyne will probably be combined with an IPS cell therapy in the future for SCI rehabilitation.

                          LINK
                          http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                            The Japanese "HAL" robot by Cyberdyne will probably be combined with an IPS cell therapy in the future for SCI rehabilitation.

                            LINK
                            Interesting. BTW, am I the only one that reads "Cyberdyne" and only thinks of The Terminator?!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yes, it is the first one fusing machine with man via brain signals. As you click down through the numbers HERE you can see how it works.
                              http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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