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Scientists have regenerated nerves after spinal cord injury

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  • Scientists have regenerated nerves after spinal cord injury

    http://www.sciencealert.com/scientis...al-cord-injury

  • #2
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1602177/
    http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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    • #3
      I've been saying for a while SCI is a chemical imbalance in the spinal cord, you get something to put it back in balance and things can happen, Dr. Silvers work has proven this too. Wonder where I can get some Artemin?
      "Life is about how you
      respond to not only the
      challenges you're dealt but
      the challenges you seek...If
      you have no goals, no
      mountains to climb, your
      soul dies".~Liz Fordred

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      • #5
        Wow, it says source being E coli, who would figure maybe a UTI could cure us one day? I guess it would be very hard though if not impossible to get some Artemin at this point in time.
        "Life is about how you
        respond to not only the
        challenges you're dealt but
        the challenges you seek...If
        you have no goals, no
        mountains to climb, your
        soul dies".~Liz Fordred

        Comment


        • #6
          I would think the dose for humans is not worked out yet, however I would try that cancer pill that has potential for SCI

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          • #7
            It becomes more and more difficult not to be skeptical about things that pop up on the web. Flashy titles designed as click baits, sensationalized articles drawing far going conclusions based on little to no evidence. This became the norm for most of sites as they try to monetize. What they fail to realize is that they are tapping into something deep inside those that are affected. Especially in the age of social media when your friends blissfully unaware of complexity of the problem spam our pages with quick solution to our misery. Not realizing they are stabbing you in your mind with a rusty same old dagger.
            Last edited by BSgimp; 05-09-2015, 11:50 PM.

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            • #8
              Abstract

              Recovery after a spinal cord injury often requires that axons restore synaptic connectivity with denervated targets several centimeters from the site of injury. Here we report that systemic artemin (ARTN) treatment promotes the regeneration of sensory axons to the brainstem after brachial dorsal root crush in adult rats. ARTN not only stimulates robust regeneration of large, myelinated sensory axons to the brainstem, but also promotes functional reinnervation of the appropriate target region, the cuneate nucleus. ARTN signals primarily through the RET tyrosine kinase, an interaction that requires the nonsignaling coreceptor GDNF family receptor (GFRα3). Previous studies reported limited GFRα3 expression on large sensory neurons, but our findings demonstrate that ARTN promotes robust regeneration of large, myelinated sensory afferents. Using a cell sorting technique, we demonstrate that GFRα3 expression is similar in myelinated and unmyelinated adult sensory neurons, suggesting that ARTN likely induces long-distance regeneration by binding GFRα3 and RET. Although ARTN is delivered for just 2 wk, regeneration to the brainstem requires more than 3 mo, suggesting that brief trophic support may initiate intrinsic growth programs that remain active until targets are reached. Given its ability to promote targeted functional regeneration to the brainstem, ARTN may represent a promising therapy for restoring sensory function after spinal cord injury.

              http://www.pnas.org/content/early/20...02057112.short

              Last edited by paolocipolla; 05-10-2015, 03:45 PM.
              In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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              • #9
                Originally posted by BSgimp View Post
                It becomes more and more difficult not to be skeptical about things that pop up on the web. Flashy titles designed as click baits, sensationalized articles drawing far going conclusions based on little to no evidence. This became the norm for most of sites as they try to monetize. What they fail to realize is that they are tapping into something deep inside those that are affected. Especially in the age of social media when your friends blissfully unaware of complexity of the problem spam our pages with quick solution to our misery. Not realizing they are stabbing you in your mind with a rusty same old dagger.
                I agree that the headline is too optimistic and perhaps misleading, but consider that 30 years ago a cure for SCI was just a dream. Many discoveries have happened that seemed to bring the solution, just like for cancer. Unfortunately to cure SCI turned out to be a very complicated puzzle. In rat studies usually you focus on a very limited number of variables, i.e. you study just a part of the problem so if you succede you don't solve the problem, but you make progress toward the solution. This study seems to be a progress. The only way to make a cure happen is by supporting good cure research. Today we are one step closer than we were yesterday.
                In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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                • #10
                  Well said. This drug does nothing for motor neurons? Motor and sensory neurons are separate things I am assuming, that is strange one is being activated while the other isn't. read that again on fire from a scientist

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                  • #11
                    Oh god watch me start eating this stuff!

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                    • #12
                      At the present time the study would be in a novelty lab result category. Much more research and work must be done to find and clear up the mechanisms. They're not working with a drug that is ready to go for humans and FDA approved, so it's not a matter of starting out with extrapolation studies right off the bat. The scientists are getting some results from a research reagent in basic studies only. In fact, you've glossed off my second post entirely which would be much more important to work with than rushing into extrapolations. This clearly was only a beginning bench study.
                      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by JamesMcM View Post
                        Well said. This drug does nothing for motor neurons? Motor and sensory neurons are separate things I am assuming, that is strange one is being activated while the other isn't. read that again on fire from a scientist
                        Motor and sensory are indeed entirely different. This study shows the ARTN is binding GFRa3 and RET. Many more studies will need to be done to see if this was only limited trophic support or if there is indeed going to be promise of longer term activity that could be utilized in a therapy. Even then, they'll be cross examining information and watching for signs of cancer and tumors is the test animals due to previously known study results.
                        http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                        • #14
                          I know, very early stuff! Still it's going on my frosted flakes. Noninvasive surgical treatments such as drugs are always encouraging to hear about.

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                          • #15
                            Originally posted by JamesMcM View Post
                            I know, very early stuff! Still it's going on my frosted flakes. Noninvasive surgical treatments such as drugs are always encouraging to hear about.
                            Well, maybe potentially a drug could be made... This may be a lot like the discovery in the John Flannigan lab where they found LAR would bind to CSPG and ultimately the students (Brad and Jared) in the Silver lab were able to make ISP (a peptide) that binds to the CSPG via utilizing a wedge. There's lots of steps and time along the way to make these discoveries turn into something significant and many don't turn out at all. At least Tufts is working on it. A nice find for such a young program.
                            Last edited by GRAMMY; 05-10-2015, 04:31 PM.
                            http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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