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Invivo scaffolding implant (first patient) showing early results!

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    Invivo scaffolding implant (first patient) showing early results!

    PHOENIX (KSAZ) - A Peoria man was the first person in the world to undergo a revolutionary type of surgery.

    The surgery was about seven months ago, and since then, he's been seeing improvements.

    He's also working to help future patients of this same type of surgery.

    October 13 was the day that changed Jordan Fallis' life forever.

    "I was just riding my dirt bike, went for a back flip, under-rotated it, and basically just scorpioned myself," said Fallis.

    His spinal cord was severely injured, but Fallis said he was in the right place at the right time.

    He was the very first patient in the world to undergo a revolutionary surgery from the doctors at Barrow Neurological Institute.

    A small rice-shaped scaffolding made by a company called Invivo was implanted on his spinal cord. The hope is that the scaffolding will help his nerve endings regrow, and repair the damaged portion of his spinal cord.

    "I know, I can't give you the exact percentages, but it is 90 percent of people with injuries as bad as mine don't have or don't get as much improvement as I have," he said.

    In therapy, Fallis can move his legs and walk underwater.

    "It's all progress; it's only been six and a half months, for how long it's been, I'm doing really well," said Fallis.

    "As bad as this whole thing has been, it's opened up so many new doors," he said.

    Recently, Fallis, along with others, started the Neuro Scaffold Foundation to help future patients financially and emotionally. He also recently struck up a close friendship with Jesi Stracham of North Carolina, the second person in the world to have this rare surgery.

    "We can vent back and forth with each other about it, it makes it easier, it makes my day a lot easier to get through," said Fallis.

    Fallis says he's looking forward to the future.

    So, what is his hope?

    "Just to be back on your feet, be back riding the bike," he said.

    At the end of May, they are planning a fundraiser for their foundation.

    For more information visit: http://neuroscaffoldfoundation.org/





    http://www.fox10phoenix.com/story/28...r-rare-surgery
    Han: "We are all ready to win, just as we are born knowing only life. It is defeat that you must learn to prepare for"

    #2
    http://www.thebarrow.org/Clinical_Trials/index.htm

    Comment


      #3
      Sounds great.
      "Life is about how you
      respond to not only the
      challenges you're dealt but
      the challenges you seek...If
      you have no goals, no
      mountains to climb, your
      soul dies".~Liz Fordred

      Comment


        #4
        Sounds very good and I do have big hope with this type of therapies , but any information about his injury?

        Comment


          #5
          Jim is Dr. Wise keeping his eye on this as a possibility to incorporate in his trial?

          Comment


            #6
            He sure is.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Jim View Post
              He sure is.
              I like it.

              Comment


                #8
                I have no idea what this therapy is...but wahoo!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Nowhere Man View Post
                  I have no idea what this therapy is...but wahoo!
                  How are we, or is it us, simpletons supposed to know if you are being serious or, what's the word ...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I believe the word is Dicklike

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I remember years ago how much Frank Reynolds talked up this type of thing with Scaffolding and it's good to see it finally happening.
                      "Life is about how you
                      respond to not only the
                      challenges you're dealt but
                      the challenges you seek...If
                      you have no goals, no
                      mountains to climb, your
                      soul dies".~Liz Fordred

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Jim View Post
                        How are we, or is it us, simpletons supposed to know if you are being serious or, what's the word ...
                        This has NOTHING to do with CHRONIC spinal cord injury. I've said this a dozen times. This doesn't belong on a cure thread for those living with SCI.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Nowhere Man View Post
                          This has NOTHING to do with CHRONIC spinal cord injury. I've said this a dozen times. This doesn't belong on a cure thread for those living with SCI.

                          Of course it belongs to this thread. Chronic or not, it's about a recovery. Let's say that man had a severe injury...he definitely wouldn't get this sort and amount of recovery without the scaffolding intervention, and if you don't know what injury was you can't discard the possibility of effectiveness.
                          And again, if this was a severe injury that got this recovery, this type of surgery could do the same in a chronic injury, the only difference is that we need a lot more rehabilitation because of our body degradation, muscle loss, very low stamina, etc, etc... I don't think I need a neuroscience degree to realise this, but a bit of common sense. And if all the researchers would think like you, and not believe that that something might work, we would never have a treatment. No disrespect, but maybe you should keep your own opinions for you, and stop posting on a cure thread and stop sharing your distrust and hopelessness,'cause some people here maybe don't need to hear this.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Silvio GS View Post
                            Of course it belongs to this thread. Chronic or not, it's about a recovery. Let's say that man had a severe injury...he definitely wouldn't get this sort and amount of recovery without the scaffolding intervention, and if you don't know what injury was you can't discard the possibility of effectiveness.
                            People have recovered from complete spinal cord injuries before. There is no way to definitely tell if he would have had this amount of recovery or not without the scaffold. That is the problem with acute studies. With no control group, there is no way to tell how much recovery happened naturally, and how much occured due to the intervention.

                            Originally posted by Silvio GS View Post
                            And again, if this was a severe injury that got this recovery, this type of surgery could do the same in a chronic injury, the only difference is that we need a lot more rehabilitation because of our body degradation, muscle loss, very low stamina, etc, etc...
                            This type of surgery would not do the same thing in a chronic injury. An acute injury is a vastly different environment from a chronic injury. The secondary effects of SCI can take days/weeks to occur - right after an SCI and in the weeks that follow, the injury is not a stable environment at all. That's why acute studies are focused on "neuroprotection" - preventing the spread of damage in the weeks after a brand new injury, in order to minimize the ultimate effect of the injury. It can take up to 2 years for people to reach a stable ASIA score - by the time someone reaches a chronic point, the effects of the injury have settled, and there is nothing more to prevent - the injury is what it is. Thus, a scaffold aimed at preventing further damage would be useless, because all the damage that will take place will have already happened. That's why many acute, neuroprotective methods for SCI will not work for chronic.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by tomsonite View Post
                              This type of surgery would not do the same thing in a chronic injury. An acute injury is a vastly different environment from a chronic injury. The secondary effects of SCI can take days/weeks to occur - right after an SCI and in the weeks that follow, the injury is not a stable environment at all. That's why acute studies are focused on "neuroprotection" - preventing the spread of damage in the weeks after a brand new injury, in order to minimize the ultimate effect of the injury. It can take up to 2 years for people to reach a stable ASIA score - by the time someone reaches a chronic point, the effects of the injury have settled, and there is nothing more to prevent - the injury is what it is. Thus, a scaffold aimed at preventing further damage would be useless, because all the damage that will take place will have already happened. That's why many acute, neuroprotective methods for SCI will not work for chronic.
                              For anyone interested in acute injury neuroprotection, Brian Kwon had an interesting paper a few years ago that is still relevant. It is open access and easy to understand in the link below.

                              A Systematic Review of Directly Applied Biologic Therapies For Acute Spinal Cord Injuries
                              http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                              Comment

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