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  • 2015 was hoping for a repair for SCI

    I keep on coming back every once in a blue moon hoping to hear somebody found a repair for this injured C-3 complete 18 years? I see everybody is making some type of advances, but I guess it's come to time to face reality. It's not going to happen in this lifetime. Only 48 still great health and shape. Still doing what I can to enjoy life. But this dream of taking a shower by myself sitting on the toilet by myself. Doesn't look like it's going to ever be here. I keep on making donations to multiple people for a repair. Will we ever hear the word, we can get chronic SCI people walking again? Or should I just come to terms and say this is it. Thanks for listening or reading.
    keiffer66

  • #2
    Keith,
    There is more research than ever going on. Sadly things have progressed less than they could have due to money, political, and other issues. Under the best of circumstances this kind of research is slow. Wish I could tell you that a breakthrough is imminent. Regrettably there is no way of knowing when that will be. You seem to be hanging in there very well, especially considering that you are a C-3. There is not much we can do but remain hopeful and patient.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      First I'd like to say that 18 years at C3 is amazing you must be very strong and have excellent care. You have held out hope a lot longer than me. I hung in for about the first 8-10 years then forgot about it. I really feel that at some poi9nt in the future "New Injuries" will be cured right away at time of injury but as for me, with my chronic injury it will not happen in my lifetime.

      I compare it to something like Polio if you got it you lived out your life with it but if you were vaccinated and never got it you were o.k. and now it has been eradicated.
      ^^(A)^^

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
        Keith,
        There is more research than ever going on. Sadly things have progressed less than they could have due to money, political, and other issues. Under the best of circumstances this kind of research is slow. Wish I could tell you that a breakthrough is imminent. Regrettably there is no way of knowing when that will be. You seem to be hanging in there very well, especially considering that you are a C-3. There is not much we can do but remain hopeful and patient.
        Well said!

        Comment


        • #5
          I don't understand how acutes are easier to fix. The immune system is still responding ... inflammation etc. I'm starting to give up hope too though. I just wanted a bladder fix! Wasn't asking for much!
          Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

          T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

          Comment


          • #6
            I gave up years ago. Our system is not set up to fine a cure where there is not a big money motivator in. You got a lot of college professors and such working off grants. They fine the cure its not going to change their lifestyle. The best scientist work for large pharmaceuticals and other industries. Fine a cure for ebola or something worth their time. Why should a guy working on a cure for SCI get up every day at 6am and work till the late hours on a cure. Their income won't change.


            Want a cure. We need a go getter to raise money of a 100 million dollars and leave it in escrow for the scientist or team that finds the cure. That team is not going to need to share info. They won't have time to look at because they'll be discovery the cure.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by TheRainman View Post
              I gave up years ago. Our system is not set up to fine a cure where there is not a big money motivator in. You got a lot of college professors and such working off grants. They fine the cure its not going to change their lifestyle. The best scientist work for large pharmaceuticals and other industries. Fine a cure for ebola or something worth their time. Why should a guy working on a cure for SCI get up every day at 6am and work till the late hours on a cure. Their income won't change.
              Just goes to show that you know zero about the man who started this website, very sad.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jim View Post
                Just goes to show that you know zero about the man who started this website, very sad.
                Wide Young & Co rock.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I got the upmost respect for Dr. Young. I have no doubt he's done everything possible to fine the cure in his thinking. But the prove is in the statistics and its not happening. His mind is wired to liberal thinking and ways and that is not going to find the cure. We need greed to find this cure. Money talks, everything else is BS.

                  The cure for Ebola took a decade, and it was greed that made it happen. If it was left to college professors and grants it would never been solved.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Agreed with Rainman. Yes hopes from Wise are huge but dont know why delays.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A cure for Ebola? Did I miss something?
                      You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                      http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                      See my personal webpage @
                      http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
                        A cure for Ebola? Did I miss something?
                        I guess you did. Didn't you here the four or so that came here infected were cured and sent home within a couple of months of treatments.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...ns-were-cured/

                          I wouldn't say they were 'cured' as much as treated. The questions now stand for how they are immune to Ebola and how this affects all of us.

                          "We are not being critical of our colleagues in west Africa. They suffer from a terrible lack of infrastructure and the sort of testing that everyone in our society takes for granted, such as the ability to do a complete blood count?measuring your red blood cells, your white blood cells and your platelets?which is done as part of any standard checkup here. The facility in Liberia where our two patients were didn?t even have this simple thing, which everyone assumes is done as part of your annual physical.

                          What we found in general is that among our Ebola patients, because of the amount of fluid they lost through diarrhea and vomiting, they had a lot of electrolyte abnormalities. And so replacing that with standard fluids [used in hospital settings] without monitoring will not do a very good job of replacing things like sodium and potassium. In both of our patients we found those levels to be very low. One of the messages we will be sending back to our colleagues is even if you don?t have the equipment to measure these levels, do be aware this is occurring when patients are having a lot of body fluid loss.

                          Our two patients also gained an enormous amount of fluid in their tissues, what we call edema. In Ebola virus disease there is damage to the liver and the liver no longer makes sufficient amount of protein; the proteins in the blood are very low and there is an enormous amount of fluid leakage out into the tissues. So one of the takeaway messages is to pay closer attention to that and perhaps early on try to replace some of these proteins that patients? livers lack."

                          .. but back to treating spinal cord injuries, there will never be a cure .. I've accepted that long ago .. I just wanted some treatments to improve the quality of my life and others. That has been the most disappointing. Lack of any treatments and in my case - for three decades (besides 4ap which was minimal but taken gladly).
                          Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                          T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The Ebola patients are given life supporting care while the body's immune system is developing a defense against the virus. Experimental drugs have been given to some but their effectiveness is not clear at this point. They are being given the same kind of support that keep newly injured SCIs alive. There is a difference between supportive care a cure.
                            You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                            http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                            See my personal webpage @
                            http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lynnifer View Post
                              http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...ns-were-cured/

                              I wouldn't say they were 'cured' as much as treated. The questions now stand for how they are immune to Ebola and how this affects all of us.

                              "We are not being critical of our colleagues in west Africa. They suffer from a terrible lack of infrastructure and the sort of testing that everyone in our society takes for granted, such as the ability to do a complete blood count?measuring your red blood cells, your white blood cells and your platelets?which is done as part of any standard checkup here. The facility in Liberia where our two patients were didn?t even have this simple thing, which everyone assumes is done as part of your annual physical.


                              What we found in general is that among our Ebola patients, because of the amount of fluid they lost through diarrhea and vomiting, they had a lot of electrolyte abnormalities. And so replacing that with standard fluids [used in hospital settings] without monitoring will not do a very good job of replacing things like sodium and potassium. In both of our patients we found those levels to be very low. One of the messages we will be sending back to our colleagues is even if you don?t have the equipment to measure these levels, do be aware this is occurring when patients are having a lot of body fluid loss.

                              Our two patients also gained an enormous amount of fluid in their tissues, what we call edema. In Ebola virus disease there is damage to the liver and the liver no longer makes sufficient amount of protein; the proteins in the blood are very low and there is an enormous amount of fluid leakage out into the tissues. So one of the takeaway messages is to pay closer attention to that and perhaps early on try to replace some of these proteins that patients? livers lack."

                              .. but back to treating spinal cord injuries, there will never be a cure .. I've accepted that long ago .. I just wanted some treatments to improve the quality of my life and others. That has been the most disappointing. Lack of any treatments and in my case - for three decades (besides 4ap which was minimal but taken gladly).


                              I'm a simple guy. Not as smart as a lot of you here. I deal with logic and common sense. I understand people and their habits. And I know that those people living today would be dead if it wasn't for that team and their cure. And they were pushed to fine that cure through financial reasons. They may deny it, but that's the fact.

                              Lets examine a non profit search for a cure. And this is no reflection on Dr. Wise.

                              Its starts with a lot of good people with great intention, but very misguided in finding it. They start with finding funding. They go to individuals, companies and government grants. The problem with that there is no expectations for their money. And not enough self reward in finding the cure. So lets look at a so called scientist working off a government grant. What would make that team to push for a quick cure if all their funding would end if there is a cure and the odds are most teams won't get credit for it. Plus the head guys around the country will lose their rock star celebrity and funded trips around the world to discuss their result. No more partying with celebrities and politicians.

                              Private company which has it own money on the line has big expectations. And you must fine result or your out of there. The scientist team not out wasting it time on funding. Their in their lab 12 hours every day searching for that cure.

                              I think the number one problem with these non profits and fund raising. They go about it in the wrong way. They don't know how or don't understand the economics of raising large amounts of government money. These single or double digits are nothing. They need to come together and find one big name with lots of political influence. like Clinton's or a Eric Holder and pay them 50 million a year to get that funding. Politicians and companies all owe them. They would be able to raise hundreds of millions and the scientist won't need to leave the lab.

                              Comment

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