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Lab grown spinal cord.

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    Lab grown spinal cord.

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/n...n-spinal-cords

    What do you guys think?

    #2
    I think the article above it titles "The lab-grown penis comes closer" is going to ruin my thanksgiving. I will have to be on the lookout all day for this encroaching lab grown penis.

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      #3
      Originally posted by t8burst View Post
      I think the article above it titles "The lab-grown penis comes closer" is going to ruin my thanksgiving. I will have to be on the lookout all day for this encroaching lab grown penis.
      Discount on a bulk buy, one new spinal cord... and yeah while you're at I'll have a new penis!

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        #4
        Originally posted by wesmaister View Post
        I think likely it will be usefull to replace some petri dish models to conduct more predictive invitro experiments, for a clinical application it seems very far away.

        Paolo
        Last edited by paolocipolla; 28 Nov 2014, 8:06 AM.
        In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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          #5
          If they can create a spinal cord from scratch using embryonic stem cells, don't understand why they can't fix a little bit of damage in a functioning spinal cord. I think the missing piece is collaboration.

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            #6
            Originally posted by JamesMcM View Post
            If they can create a spinal cord from scratch using embryonic stem cells, don't understand why they can't fix a little bit of damage in a functioning spinal cord. I think the missing piece is collaboration.
            a) it's a LOT of damage to spinal cord. The motor axons of spinal cord die below injury site & sensory axons above injury site die. It is not just like replugging two ends together.
            b) An accumulation of several feet need to be regenerated as opposed to an embryo-sized spinal cord
            c) the targets both in brain & down the cord (that go to muscles) are already set in a functioning spinal cord. The neurons are already there. The embryo started from scratch.

            The missing piece is still the same as it ever was: knowledge. But this is great news. I'm sure they can earn a lot from this.

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              #7
              Agreed, but I'm sure you can agree collaboration is something we all wish for and could be very important. (by collaboration I don't only mean between researchers, but with treatments and techniques to attack the damaged cord)

              Ah I have come with some debate from others on that topic, and my knowledge does not support a solid answer. All or most motor axons do generally die below injuries after a complete SCI?

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                #8
                Originally posted by Nowhere Man View Post
                c) the targets both in brain & down the cord (that go to muscles) are already set in a functioning spinal cord. The neurons are already there. The embryo started from scratch.
                Certainly the brain and spinal cord are developing quickly in the embryo and throughout the early years of life and strong networks of synapses are being established. However, brain plastcitiy in adults is an increasingly well documented area of research, showing that new connections are made and old ones can be modified and reset throughout life. Resetting is never going to be easy, nor as effective as using the previous networks, nonetheless work with brain injured patients and stroke victims has shown that not all brain synapses are completely and irreversibly set. I am optimistic that if new Spinal Cord can be generated then the brain is capable of establishing synapses that will make good use of it.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Adrian View Post
                  Certainly the brain and spinal cord are developing quickly in the embryo and throughout the early years of life and strong networks of synapses are being established. However, brain plastcitiy in adults is an increasingly well documented area of research, showing that new connections are made and old ones can be modified and reset throughout life. Resetting is never going to be easy, nor as effective as using the previous networks, nonetheless work with brain injured patients and stroke victims has shown that not all brain synapses are completely and irreversibly set. I am optimistic that if new Spinal Cord can be generated then the brain is capable of establishing synapses that will make good use of it.

                  My opinion and purely hypothetical:

                  Can you train your mind, over x amount of months / years to move your left leg whenever you think of moving your right hand? Yes the nervous system is plastic and able to adapt but there are limits. You're talking about the nervous system's ability to pick up slack from a neighboring neuron or strengthening a pathway through repeated use. If somehow the cord regenerated, without adequate signaling, it would be a clusterf*&k with some crazy connections (like trying to move your pinky moves your big toe instead). The brain would not be able to tell that connection to go to the pinky. So sure, one may get synapses, but will it be to the point of any semblance of normalcy? I doubt it. That's why I am a big proponent of potential artificial link b/w brain & spinal cord. I think about opening my hand, an algorithm decodes it, sends signal to my hand / spinal cord to open it. It would feel more real than a clusterf*&k regeneration. It is more feasible too.

                  I will say that regeneration should be researched heavily. It can one day help bring back function. I don't think it will resemble pre-injury but it can become a "new normal" with plenty of benefits.
                  Last edited by Nowhere Man; 7 Dec 2014, 11:13 PM.

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