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New "cure" from uk and Poland. Been posted yet

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    New "cure" from uk and Poland. Been posted yet

    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...s-9807010.html

    #2
    Whaaaaaat?!?

    I don't know what to say! Sounds promising - isn't it weird that lots of breakthroughs are happening at once? But then again SCI veterans have said there have been 'breakthroughs' for the past 3 or so decades they have been injured. Lets see if someone can dig up some more information, as I am only able to get my info from the article you posted...

    Guys, the UCL (University College of London) is 15 mins drive from me!

    Regards

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      #3
      Originally posted by taymas View Post
      Lets see if someone can dig up some more information, as I am only able to get my info from the article you posted...

      Regards
      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy...ll-transplant/
      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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        #4
        And you sir MR GRAMMY are amazing. Thanks

        EDIT: I've just read it - it is really interesting, especially the observed syringomyelia, but changes on one patient from ASIA A to C is remarkable. I'm just curious whether or not the patient that walked has improved his motor scores vs locomotor score; like Dr Wise Young's trial; - it trains the Central Pattern Regulator/Generator (I can't remember the exact name.)
        Last edited by taymas; 20 Oct 2014, 10:59 PM.

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          #5
          It's also on bbc.

          http://www.bbc.com/news/health-29645760

          Comment


            #6
            That was an amazing read. I really liked how they described the progress, and the impact of this treatment for the SCI community.

            Comment


              #7
              The first signs that the technique was reaping rewards came six months later [after the surgery] when Darek reported pain from a small pressure sore on his right hip - the first time he had felt sensation in his lower body since his attack.

              Around the same time he began to feel tension being applied to his leg muscles during his post-operative physiotherapy and the impossible dream of so many paralysis sufferers - the recovery of sensation and movement - began to seem real.

              Within 19 months of the operation, Darek was able to tell the direction of movement of his feet in tests with up to 85 per cent accuracy and could discriminate between the movement of his toes and his whole foot.
              Ramp it up! More patients, now please.

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                #8
                This is probably the usual ramp up of a paper that is due to appear tomorrow in a major scientific journal.
                It's a continuation of the paper in 2013. Stay tuned...
                http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                  #9
                  No way was regeneration of the cord the mechanism of recovery. Had to be remyelination/sprouting of existing nerve fibers. Great news nonetheless if it is real.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by kate View Post
                    Ramp it up! More patients, now please.
                    It appears they have reason to look forward at Ph 2 & 3 clinical trials.
                    http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                      It appears they have reason to look forward at Ph 2 & 3 clinical trials.
                      Agree. It's going to take for effing ever to see how this plays out, eh? 6 months post intervention before the first sensation returns. Wow.

                      For grins, here's what Sam Maddox wrote about the OEG approach just a few months ago. It's a good cautionary tale, IMO, about why as much as we all hate the snail's pace of science, there's a downside to rushing in.

                      The gist of his article is that getting ahead of a promising therapy before its time is not always going to turn out well.

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                        #12
                        Something we probably know already, but it's interesting to hear this in the news:

                        The lack of financial incentive for the pharmaceutical industry could help explain why it has taken so long for the research to get this far. Using a patient's own cells to heal them means there is no profit for the pharmaceutical industry.

                        Prof Raisman said: "It would be my proudest boast if I could say that no patient had had to pay one penny for any of the information we have found." [MORE]

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                          #13
                          The Independent isn't just good news. Look at this tragedy!
                          http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...s-9806972.html

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Nowhere Man View Post
                            No way was regeneration of the cord the mechanism of recovery. Had to be remyelination/sprouting of existing nerve fibers. Great news nonetheless if it is real.
                            The technique the article describes is somewhat similar to what Dr. Yu Shang Lee and Dr. Jerry Silver are doing. Here they describe peripheral nerve bridges taken from the sural nerve in the ankle + ensheathing glia cultured from the patients olfactory bulb injected into the cord stumps on either side of the bridge. (Ensheathing glia modulate CSPGs and help to create a nice aligned interface between the Schwann cells in the graft and astrocytes in the cord). Lots of physical therapy was given to this stab victim as well. If you remember correctly, Dr. Silver used FGF and Condroitinase to accomplish basically the same thing. Among possible mechanisms for the functional improvement both the MEPs and DTI studies suggest that transplantation of OECs may mediate some restitution of efferent and afferent long white matter tracts in these patients. I'm guessing the scientific paper tomorrow will be a follow up report on the stabbing victim firefighter that was mentioned in the 2013 paper. The London team and their collaborators at Wroclaw Medical University now need to raise about 10m to fund surgery in Poland for a further group of around ten patients to test and refine the implant technique over the next five years. Researchers are also exploring the possibility of bringing the technique to a British specialist unit.

                            Last edited by GRAMMY; 21 Oct 2014, 12:00 AM.
                            http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Very excited to see how the technique develops while comparing the results from multiple teams and neurosurgery centers. First surgery performed on a "severed" cord resulting from a knife injury? ASIA A to C is a pretty amazing jump. Can't wait to see the functional return achieved from a few more test cases. Will be reading the published paper tomorrow.

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