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Paralysed patients regain voluntary movement with spinal stimulation

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    #46
    I have the feeling it might be fast tracked. There can be no harm I could imagine with what was done to the four subjects in the trials and it seems like this can only be beneficial to people with at least complete SCI, cant make things worse if it's a complete injury. I'd think even in incompletes who have some function it would be a long shot they would loose any function or sensation.

    I was apparently wrong about Medtronic it looks to be another company that will produce the more fancy electrode units. Apparently this is a lot more complex than just a simple one electrode design. Wow, though this sure would be an interesting project to be working on, I wish I were a part of it. I am very excited.

    This article cooled my jets a little bit. http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/...703241408.html but all this news is still great. It was Medtronic that made the implant used for this trial, but might be another company to make the more advanced units used in future trials.
    Last edited by Curt Leatherbee; 9 Apr 2014, 2:32 PM.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

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      #47
      Even I am excited about this, and I don't have a SCI.
      I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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        #48
        If this next round goes as well as the first four guys, it would be flat stupid to not have a multi-center rollout. I could see if there was variability in results, but four out of four is not a fluke.

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          #49
          Though I continue to guard optimism, this is pretty exciting. I agree with the many of you, four out of four is real.
          www.symbolofstrength.com

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            #50
            Yes and it's suppose to get even better in time when the 27 electrode system is released, then people stand a good chance of actually walking rather than just being able to move their legs with no real secondary muscle participation. I think things are going to advance fairly quickly in this field of research. Apparently the 27 electrode system will be ready by the end of the year and testing will start and then maybe be available on the market ready for implant in patients within around 2.5 years if all goes well with FDA approval and all.
            Last edited by Curt Leatherbee; 10 Apr 2014, 12:15 AM.
            "Life is about how you
            respond to not only the
            challenges you're dealt but
            the challenges you seek...If
            you have no goals, no
            mountains to climb, your
            soul dies".~Liz Fordred

            Comment


              #51
              i agree with Curt .. i think this will take off pretty quickly... what is it going to cost and will insurance pay for it , is my thought at this point..

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                #52
                What really gets me is that this technology goes back to the early 80's shortly after the time I was first injured. Around '85 I was out of work after having a really good job and hit the highway for a one year trip to nowhere all around the country to try and "find myself" I remember at a hotel I stayed at a guy who worked there behind the counter gave me an article to try and give me hope about a possible "cure" The article was about spinal cord stimulation taken from some magazine. This thread kind of explains what happened back then and it's sad it was not explored further at the time, it would have helped a lot of people and it would be in a very advanced stage today. http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/...ralysis-again/
                "Life is about how you
                respond to not only the
                challenges you're dealt but
                the challenges you seek...If
                you have no goals, no
                mountains to climb, your
                soul dies".~Liz Fordred

                Comment


                  #53
                  Hey curt, I remember discussing this with you probably eight or so years with the company called Brain Gate or something of the like. I replied to them but I'm not sure what happened to the company…
                  I do think there's something here and it is exciting.

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                    #54
                    Yes, that was Cyberkinetics, I remember meeting with them, I think it was somewhere in MA South shore. I think they abandoned the spinal cord stim idea in favor of Braingate which is a brain implant allowing quads to interface with computers. I hope there is not going to be some legal dispute with new research as I see Cyberkinetics has a lot of patents. http://www.cyberkinetics.com/ although it looks like most of these relates to braingate. Not sure why they gave up on the spinal stimulator. Now I'm a little less excited about this new research thinking about how many years I've been waiting for this thing to pan out.
                    Originally posted by Chaz19 View Post
                    Hey curt, I remember discussing this with you probably eight or so years with the company called Brain Gate or something of the like. I replied to them but I'm not sure what happened to the company…
                    I do think there's something here and it is exciting.
                    "Life is about how you
                    respond to not only the
                    challenges you're dealt but
                    the challenges you seek...If
                    you have no goals, no
                    mountains to climb, your
                    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

                    Comment


                      #55
                      Anyone have a clue how spasticity fits into this picture? I didn't read anything in this thread about that. Also, is sensation being addressed by this device? I know bowel/bladder/sexual function was mentioned...but is that strictly motor (i.e., no sensation improvement)?
                      No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

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                        #56
                        So it looks like the regaining of bowel/bladder were secondary benefits to the original intent of the study which was to get movement. I'm wondering if the same type of stimulus is "killing two birds with one rock" in that regard, then. A wicked combination may have Professor Young's therapy incorporate something like this post cell implant.
                        No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

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                          #57
                          i must admit, this brings me to tears with hope. i am so happy for those 4 guys.
                          T5/6, ASIA A, injured 30 Nov 08
                          Future SCI Alumnus.
                          I don't want to dance in the rain, I want to soar above the storm.

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                            #58
                            Is interesting how the implanted device allowed the two separated parts of the spinal cord lesion were able to connect in the correct way so the pacient can do voluntary movements.

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                              #59
                              Originally posted by Tufelhunden View Post
                              So it looks like the regaining of bowel/bladder were secondary benefits to the original intent of the study which was to get movement. I'm wondering if the same type of stimulus is "killing two birds with one rock" in that regard, then. A wicked combination may have Professor Young's therapy incorporate something like this post cell implant.
                              Is the "recovery" of B&B scientifically documented or just an anecdotal report?

                              Do they still need catheters?

                              Paolo
                              Last edited by paolocipolla; 10 Apr 2014, 5:30 PM.
                              In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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                                #60
                                Would this work in patients where the spinal cord was nearly severed? Or is it only for patients where there are still a lot of "connections" at the level of injury?

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