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Large animal trial for Chondroitinase is underway

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    Large animal trial for Chondroitinase is underway

    https://spinalcordresearchandadvocac...e-is-underway/
    http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

    #2
    How many dogs actually suffer spinal cord injuries? Seems like the number would be very low.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Jim View Post
      How many dogs actually suffer spinal cord injuries? Seems like the number would be very low.
      Jim, I don't know that there's a solid number or estimation on the numbers from all the research vet hospitals throughout the country.

      About 120 alone end up at Texas A&M...

      Naturally Occurring Spinal Cord Injuries in Dogs
      2.3% of dogs admitted to veterinary teaching hospitals have naturally injured spinal cords
      48% to 72% of all affected dogs are Dachshunds
      1 in 5 Dachshunds are affected over their lifetime
      Other common breeds: Beagles, Corgis, Pekingese, and Shih Tzus

      http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2012/01/113...-cord-injuries

      http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs.../neu.2010.1645
      Last edited by GRAMMY; 10 Feb 2014, 1:20 PM.
      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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        #4
        Interesting, thanks.

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          #5
          I met a para pug once... he was so inspirational and I told his owner she was a Saint. Maybe he could get in on this trial? If there is room on account of all the injured weiner dogs (fix the weiners first ). I would try Viagra and straighten them little guys out then we'll get to them pesky pugs.


          I already know there's something wrong with me.

          Comment


            #6
            Anyone wanting to watch the new dog trial posts and photos via Facebook can see it at:

            https://www.facebook.com/ChondroDogsIowaStateVetMed
            http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

            Comment


              #7
              Dogs are at least 6 weeks after injury so that makes them a chronic model, good.
              "I'm manic as hell-
              But I'm goin' strong-
              Left my meds on the sink again-
              My head will be racing by lunchtime"

              <----Scott Weiland---->

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                #8
                more dogs than you think might suffer spinal cord injury. Especially long backed breeds. It's common for dachshunds to (go down in the back) and need artificial discs or decompression surgery. I got to see several surgeries between 1982 and 1990. I wondered why they could recover so much better than a human being could. when one went down, it could be sudden from a jump off a couch, or over time, and the herniation was often like a complete injury. I mean no feeling in the back end, no bowel and bladder control, and no use of the body behind the herniation. they might recover after surgery, hydro and physical therapy in as little as 3-4 months, and some with less complete loss would be recovering less time than that. I always wondered why dogs could recover such an assault to the spinal cord and human beings cant. my first experience was a family pet, she went to Ames Iowa, which is a teaching hospital. most dogs would be put down, but in 1982, we got to try a new experimental disc replacement surgery on our dog. it got me interested in becoming a large animal vet, so got to see some really amazing surgeries over period of four years. I never got to be a vet, but it gave me hope for a cure when I was injured many years later. the dogs didn't know they might never walk again. they almost always did if they were small and the surgery went well.

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                  #9
                  When did this trial start exactly? Is dr. Jeffery with Acorda?
                  Last edited by Jim; 27 Feb 2014, 1:12 PM.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by JamesMcM View Post
                    When did this trial start exactly? Is dr. Jeffery with Acorda?


                    https://spinalcordresearchandadvocac...012-symposium/

                    I don't know the exact start date, but it was some time during 2013 that enrollment started. Dr. Jeffery isn't with Acorda. He's a vet working research studies in Ames Iowa with the College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University . The large animal trial for Chondroitinase is sponsored by Spinal Research in the UK. That was presented by Mark Bacon at W2W 2013 titled, The Changing Role of Not for Gain Organizations. Is it a Case of the Good, the Bad and the Ugly?
                    http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                      Anyone wanting to watch the new dog trial posts and photos via Facebook can see it at:

                      https://www.facebook.com/ChondroDogsIowaStateVetMed
                      Grammy,

                      do you know anything about what came out of the pig studies that Acorda was doing in 2011 with Ch'ase (Tony Caggiano at W2W in 2011 said they were doing pig studies)?

                      Paolo
                      In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by paolocipolla View Post
                        Grammy, do you know anything about what came out of the pig studies? Paolo
                        You can find out here via Phone, Fax or Email: http://www.acorda.com/ContactUs.aspx
                        http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                          You can find out here via Phone, Fax or Email: http://www.acorda.com/ContactUs.aspx
                          I have asked already few weeks ago, but didn't get any reply to my email, so I thought to ask you if you had any info.

                          Did you ask too and they didn't reply?

                          Paolo
                          In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Here is an invention similar to ch'ase.

                            1. Neurosurgery. 1996 May;38(5):976-83; discussion 983-4. Reduction of extraneural scarring by ADCON-T/N after surgical intervention. Petersen J(1), Russell L, Andrus K, MacKinnon M, Silver J, Kliot M. Author information: (1)Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. The effects of ADCON-T/N (Gliatech, Inc., Cleveland, OH), a carbohydrate polymer gel, on peripheral nerve scarring and regeneration were studied in rodents undergoing three types of surgical intervention. Procedure I involved external neurolysis of the sciatic nerve from surrounding tissues and separation of its tibial and peroneal components. Procedure II involved the addition of an abrasive injury. Procedure III involved transection and suture anastomosis of the tibial component. ADCON-T/N or a control gel was locally applied in a blind fashion. Additional animals received no gel, as a further control. Animals underwent second operations 4 weeks after Procedures I and II and 6 weeks after Procedure III. The surgical sites were evaluated using a numerical grading scheme to assess wound healing, sciatic nerve adherence to surrounding tissues, and separability of its tibial and peroneal components. Animals receiving ADCON-T/N demonstrated reduced nerve adherence to surrounding tissues and enhanced separability of the tibial and peroneal components, compared with animals receiving control gel or no gel. Quantitative histological analysis revealed a statistically significant reduction in the amount of dense scar tissue surrounding nerves treated with ADCON-T/N. No evidence of nerve toxicity caused by ADCON-T/N was noted. Counts of regenerating myelinated axons in animals undergoing nerve transection and suture repair did not statistically differ in treated and untreated animals. In conclusion, ADCON-T/N seems to be both safe and effective in reducing extraneural scar formation after peripheral nerve surgery and local trauma.
                            Perhaps there are similar problems with the pigs.

                            1. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2001 Jan 1;26(1):115-7; discussion 118. Unrecognized durotomy after lumbar discectomy: a report of four cases associated with the use of ADCON-L. Le AX(1), Rogers DE, Dawson EG, Kropf MA, De Grange DA, Delamarter RB. Author information: (1)Spine Institute at Saint John's Health Center, Santa Monica, CA, USA. Comment in Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2001 Nov 1;26(21):2405. STUDY DESIGN: This report describes four cases of symptomatic cerebral spinal fluid leak after lumbar microdiscectomy where ADCON-L was used. OBJECTIVES: To report that ADCON-L may exacerbate cerebral spinal fluid leak from unrecognized, small dural tears after lumbar discectomy. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: ADCON-L is a porcine-derived polyglycan that is used with increasing frequency in spinal surgery. It is advocated to reduce postoperative peridural fibrosis and adhesions. METHODS: Four cases of symptomatic cerebral spinal fluid leak after lumbar microdiscectomy were identified. Information on these patients was obtained by chart review. RESULTS: Three patients had small, inadvertent durotomies that were not appreciated at surgery even with the aid of a microscope. The dural violation in the fourth patient occurred at the previous epidural steroid injection site located on the contralateral side of the laminotomy. CONCLUSION: ADCON-L may inhibit dural healing and exacerbate cerebral spinal fluid leak from microscopic durotomies not recognized at the time of surgery.
                            1. J Korean Neurosurg Soc. 2010 Sep;48(3):268-71. doi: 10.3340/jkns.2010.48.3.268.
                            Epub 2010 Sep 30. Delayed Detected Unexpected Complication of ADCON-L? Gel in Lumbar Surgery. Kim SB(1), Lim YJ. Author information: (1)Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea. The ADCON-L gel? (Gliatech, Cleveland, OH, USA), a carbohydrate polymer gel, has been shown in a controlled clinical study to inhibit postsurgical adhesions and improve a patient's clinical outcome. Immediate complication of this gel has been reported in the recent literature including back pain, radiculitis and durotomy. However, delayed detection of disturbance of muscle healing and attachment in late postoperative state has been rarely reported. This report documents an unexpected delayed detected complication of the anti-adhesion barrier gel, which was used after lumbar discectomy one year ago, with review of literature.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by crabbyshark View Post
                              Here is an invention similar to ch'ase. Perhaps there are similar problems with the pigs.
                              Chondroitinase isn't a carbohydrate polymer gel used as an anti-adhesion barrier. Maybe hogs leak or have adhesion problems with surrounding tissues, I don't know...
                              http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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