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    #16
    Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
    Chondroitinase isn't a carbohydrate polymer gel used as an anti-adhesion barrier. Maybe hogs leak or have adhesion problems with surrounding tissues, I don't know...
    file:///Users/jerrysilver/Desktop/ADCON%20Clinical%20Paper%20British%20Journal%20of% 20Plastic%20Surgery%20%20%20%20%20%202000-2.pdf

    Post this address in your browser. One of my better achievements.

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      #17
      Originally posted by jsilver View Post
      file:///Users/jerrysilver/Desktop/ADCON%20Clinical%20Paper%20British%20Journal%20of% 20Plastic%20Surgery%20%20%20%20%20%202000-2.pdf

      Post this address in your browser. One of my better achievements.
      Thank you Dr. Silver. I'm unfamiliar with the animal studies that led up to the inception of the ADCON gel but I was aware that it's been used in over 300,000 operations and 34 countries have it available. It is indeed a remarkable product and the photo's of the 3 plastic surgery case patients in the publication are super.

      "The use of ADCON-T/N glycosaminoglycan gel in the revision of tethered scars" D. E. Boyce, G. Bantick* and M. S. C. Murison*
      British Journal of Plastic" Surgery (2000), 53, 403405
      9 2000 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons
      doi: 10.1045/bjps.2000.3317

      SUMMARY. Recurrent subdermal scar tethering is a difficult management problem in areas of high tissue mobility.
      We describe a novel solution to this clinical problem, which involves instilling the anti-fibrotic get ADCON|
      T/N in the plane between the skin and the underlying structures. We present our results in three difficult clinical
      situations where excellent results have been achieved using this method. 9 2000 The British Association of Plastic
      Surgeons
      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

      Comment


        #18
        The plastic surgery stuff is not impressive. How do you know that those people wouldn't have gotten better without the use of ADCON at all?

        http://www.locateadoc.com/pictures/s...-repair-c23130

        http://www.realself.com/photo/672300

        Do those people look different than the people in the ADCON study?



        Evidence suggests ADCON is ineffective, if not hazardous.

        1. Eur Spine J. 2008 Dec;17(12):1714-20. doi: 10.1007/s00586-008-0805-8. Epub 2008 Oct 23.Peridural scar and its relation to clinical outcome: a randomised study on surgically treated lumbar disc herniation patients. R?nnberg K(1), Lind B, Zoega B, Gadeholt-G?thlin G, Halldin K, Gellerstedt M, Brisby H. Author information: (1)Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, G?teborg University, 413 45, G?teborg, Sweden. katarina.ronnberg@vgregion.se A prospective randomised 2-year follow-up study on patients undergoing lumbar disc herniation surgery. The objective was to investigate the relationship between peridural scarring and clinical outcome, the scar development 6 and 24 months postoperatively by using MRI, and if ADCON-L (a bioresorbable carbohydrate polymer gel) has an effect on scar size and/or improve patients' outcome after lumbar disc herniation surgery. The association between peridural scarring and recurrent pain after lumbar disc herniation surgery is debated. Numerous materials have been used in attempts to prevent or reduce postoperative peridural scarring; however, there are conflicting data regarding the clinical effects. The study included 119 patients whose mean age was 39 years (18-66); 51 (47%) were women. Sixty patients (56%) were perioperatively randomised to receive ADCON-L, and 48 (44%) served as controls. All patients underwent MRI at 6 and 24 months postoperatively, and an independent radiologist graded the size, location and development of the scar, by using a previously described scoring system. Pre- and 2-year postoperatively patients graded their leg pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). At the 2-year follow-up patients rated their satisfaction with treatment (subjective outcome) and were evaluated by an independent neurologist (objective outcome), using MacNab score. There was no relationship between size or localisation of the scar and any of the clinical outcomes (VAS, subjective and objective outcome). The scar size decreased between 6 and 24 months in 49%, was unchanged in 42% and increased in 9% of the patients. Patients treated with ADCON-L did not demonstrate any adverse effects, nor did they demonstrate less scarring or better clinical outcome than control patients. No significant association between the presence of extensive peridural scar or localisation of scar formation and clinical outcome could be detected in the present study. Further, no positive or negative effects of ADCON-L used in disc herniation surgery could be seen.

        1. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;76(7):1031-3. Bilateral subdural haematomata and lumbar pseudomeningocele due to a chronic leakage of liquor cerebrospinalis after a lumbar discectomy with the application of ADCON-L gel. Kuhn J(1), Hofmann B, Knitelius HO, Coenen HH, Bewermeyer H. Author information: (1)Department of Neurology, Kliniken der Stadt K?ln, Krankenhaus Merheim, Ostmerheimerstrasse 200, D-51109 Cologne, Germany. Kuhnj@kliniken-koeln.de The anti-adhesion gel ADCON-L has been available since the end of the 1990s. During disc surgery it can be applied to the spinal nerve roots and the dura mater spinalis in order to inhibit fibroblast migration and thus avoid postoperative adhesions or excessive keloids, respectively. Due to the way ADCON-L works, inadvertent, intraoperational dural lesions may stay open much longer than usual because ADCON-L inhibits the natural healing process. Possible consequences are a chronic leakage of cerebrospinal fluid in combination with intracranial hypotension syndrome. We report on a patient who underwent lumbar disc surgery with application of ADCON-L gel. Postoperatively he suffered from acute headache, nausea, and vomiting. A lumbar pseudomeningocele was demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, cranial MRI revealed bilateral, chronic subdural haematomata which indicated intracranial hypotension syndrome or continuous leakage of cerebrospinal fluid at the lumbar site. With conservative treatment the problems were gradually reduced and eventually the subdural haematomata were no longer detected. The pseudomeningocele persisted over a 4 month period of observation. Because of the complications we found, the local application of ADCON-L during lumbar disc surgery should be critically evaluated.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by crabbyshark View Post
          The plastic surgery stuff is not impressive. How do you know that those people wouldn't have gotten better without the use of ADCON at all?

          http://www.locateadoc.com/pictures/s...-repair-c23130

          http://www.realself.com/photo/672300

          Do those people look different than the people in the ADCON study?



          Evidence suggests ADCON is ineffective, if not hazardous.


          As usual you have no idea what you are talking about and, also as usual, you like to highlight only the negative. A complication with ADCON can occur when surgeons inadvertently puncture the dura when they perform discectomies. The product works so well that it inhibits the natural scarring process that would usually close small dural leaks. ADCON is being marketed by a company called BiosCompass. They are a wonderful group of people who recently acquired the rights to ADCON and they are committed to bringing a highly beneficial product back to the US market. ADCON works wonderfully well to prevent painful peripheral nerve adhesive entrapments, disfiguring and painful scarring between the skin and underlying structures after deep lacerations, tracheotomies etc (see British Journal paper), abdominal adhesions, pelvic adhesions and adhesions around implants. It works to prevent a devastating condition known as failed back syndrome that can develop after discectomies. And the uses go on and on. Anybody reading this post and knows of someone suffering with pain due to adhesion formation anywhere in the body should contact BiosCompass because they can possibly help with FDA compassionate use.

          Comment


            #20
            Here's a few other human studies mentioned in addition to the British Association of Plastic Surgeons publication.

            Efficacy of Adcon-T/N after primary flexor tendon repair in zone II: a controlled clinical trial. Golash A, Kay A, Warner JG, Peck F, Watson JS, Lees VC. Department of Plastic Surgery, Wythenshawe Hospital, Wythenshawe, Manchester, UK. J Hand Surg (Br) 2003, Apr 28(2): 113-5

            Summary: prospective, double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, 45 patients with 82 flexor tendon repairs in 50 digits. Time to achieve final range of motion was significantly shorter in Adcon treated patients. Rupture rate (esp late) was higher in Adcon patients but this was not significant.

            The use of Adcon-T/N after repair of zone II flexor tendons. Liew SH, Potokar T, Bantick GL, Morgan I, Ford C, Murison MS. Welsh Center for Burns and Plastic Surgery, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK Chir Main 2001 Oct; 20(5): 384-7

            Summary: double-blind, randomised trial in 59 patients(Adcon-T/N vs control), early mobilisation. At 6 months, better PIP motion in Adcon group.

            Treatment of recurrent peripheral nerve entrapment problems: role of scar formation and its possible treatment. McCall TD, Grant GA, Britz GW, Goodkin R, Kliot M. Dept Neurological Surg, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, USA. Neurosurg Clin N Am 2001 Apr; 12(2): 329-39

            Summary: retrospective review: prolonged clinical improvement in 67% of patients treated with Adcon-T/N after re-operation of a peripheral nerve versus 50% in the group not treated with Adcon-T/N at re-operation.

            The effectiveness of Adcon-T/N, a new anti-adhesion barrier gel, in fresh divisions of the flexor tendons in zone II. Mentzel M, Hoss H, Keppler P, Ebinger T, Kinzl L, Wachter NJ.
            Dept Traumatology, Hand- and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ulm, Germany. J Hand Surg [Br] 2000 Dec; 25(6):590-2

            Summary: prospective, randomised, 30 patients with fresh trauma of the flexor tendons in zone II of the hand: excellent results at 12 weeks in 15/16 Adcon-T/N treated patients versus 12/14 control but no statistically significant difference of total active motion and extension lag between the groups.

            The use of Adcon-T/N glycosaminoglycan gel in the revision of tethered scars.
            Boyce DE, Bantick G, Murison MS. West Midlands Regional Plastic and Jaw Surgery Unit, Wordsley Hospital, Stourbridge, West Midlands, UK. Br J Plast Surg 2000 Jul;53(5):403-5

            Summary: excellent results in recurrent subdermal scar tethering by instilling Adcon-T/N in the plane between the skin and the underlying structures.

            Adcon-T/N as an adjuvant in tendon transfers in tetraplegia. Gagliano C, Della Rosa N, Leti Acciaro A, Caserta G, Landi A. S.C.Chir Mano e Microchirurgia, Azienda Ospedaliera Modena, Italia. Poster session at tetaplegia congress in 1999.

            Summary: 3 tetraplegia patients needing tendon transfers in hands were treated with Adcon-T/N around tendons ( 1st in July 1995): no adhesions in any of the patients and good ROM at 4 years, 1.6 years and 2 months post-op.

            Comment am?liorer la chirurgie des tendons de la main. Merle M, Dautel G, Dumontier C. Service de Chirurgie Plastique et Reconstructrice de l’Appareil Locomoteur au
            CHU de Nancy. Review in French in Journal Fran?ais de l’Orthop?die: ma?trise orthop?dique. 1998.

            Summary : extensive review of Adcon-T/N studies and why its use is advocated.

            Peritendinous and perineural scar adhesions. Treatment with a new anti-adhesion barrier gel, Adcon-T/N.
            Merle M, Foucher G, Egloff DV. Service de Chirurgie Plastique et Reconstructrice de l’Appareil Locomoteur au CHU de Nancy. In : Hand Surgery, Rehart S, Zichner L, Thieme Stuttgart, 1997, 33-40.

            Ttendon tenolysis: better functional outcome and no ruptures. With Adcon-T/N postop mobilisation could be postponed resulting in less pain for patient.

            Summary : excellent tolerance, absence of infections and allergies, absence of tendon ruptures, better ROM than control population, most obvious in extensor tendon tenolysis: better functional outcome and no ruptures. With Adcon-T/N postop mobilisation could be postponed resulting in less pain for patient.

            A novel bioresorbable barrier gel (Adcon-T/N)for the inhibition of postoperative peritendinous adhesions: A clinical study in tenolysis procedures of the hand.
            Raffoul W, Egloff DV. Clinique Chirurgicale Permanence Longeraie and CHU Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland. Poster presentation at the 20th World Congress of the SICOT, Aug 19-23,
            1996, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

            Summary: retrospective, with control 32 cases of tenolysis procedures on digits: significantly greater ROM in Adcon-T/N treated patients, no significant adverse effects.
            http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by jsilver View Post
              And the uses go on and on.
              Here's a different use study done in pigs with orthopedic research ..


              Inhibition of spinal fusion by use of a tissue ingrowth inhibitor.
              Zou X, Li H, Egund N, Lind M, Bunger C.
              Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Aarhus University Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark
              Eur Spine J. 2004 March; 13(2): 157-63.

              Summary: In a single-level intertransverse arthrodesis model in pigs, Adcon gel mixed into autogenous bone graft was found to delay or decrease bone formation. This accords with the authors hypothesis that the use of Adcon gel can prevent the occurrence of spontaneous fusion in very young scoliosis patients.
              http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

              Comment


                #22
                so in theory it's best suited as a candidate for Acute injury ?Or am I missing something ?If so ,I have no invested interest .


                For a long time I have been curious about something but have never said it :some people say that studying and treating Acute injury is good for the science and will help advance the work for chronic injuries and yadda yadda (insert another excuse for studying Acute injury ), but how exactly does focusing on Acute injury in any way similar to treating a chronic injury ?Doesn't it become an Entirely different animal ?And should totally be treated as such ,and chronic injury should be in it's own lane?
                "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

                "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


                2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
                Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by lunasicc42 View Post
                  so in theory it's best suited as a candidate for Acute injury?
                  Are you talking about the Chondroitinase large animal trial or the derailed off subject of carbohydrate polymer gel for anti-adhesion?
                  http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Yes ,I meant the carbohydrate gel in my question but my premis was to hilight that age old question about chronic research v.s Acute research ,the stigma has long been that Acute injury research helps chronic cure research as well ,and I believed it but was a little skeptical .I don't see it panning out that way,I see them as being two Entirely different animals that need two different approaches
                    "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

                    "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


                    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
                    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by lunasicc42 View Post
                      Yes ,I meant the carbohydrate gel in my question but my premis was to hilight that age old question about chronic research v.s Acute research ,the stigma has long been that Acute injury research helps chronic cure research as well ,and I believed it but was a little skeptical .I don't see it panning out that way,I see them as being two Entirely different animals that need two different approaches
                      So, as you can see by reading through the ADCON gel human clinical summaries, this anti-adhesion drug is being used in acute applications as well as chronic applications with many different medical problems being addressed for people. In the animal studies leading up to taking this to market, one can see that a multitude of factors were considered and researched. It didn't lead to a therapy only being brought to market for a single lane patient therapy for mankind. I'm not sure how one would enter a chronic vs. acute debate with the product since it didn't stay in a "chronic lane". It appears that mankind has benefited from it at multiple time points due to the animal research.
                      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Drs. Kuhn, Hofmann, Knitelius, Coenen, Bewermeyer, Ronnberg, Lind, Zoega, Gadeholt-Gothlin, Halldin, Gellerstedt, Brisby, Le, Rogers, Dawson, Kropf, De Grange, Delamarter, Kim, and Lim found evidence that in humans monitored at long post operative time points, ADCON is ineffective and sometimes hazardous.


                        Here (link) is Dr. Craig Rabb:

                        Indeed, an antiadhesion agent not only was studied but also found its way to approval for use in the United States. In 1998, Adcon-L was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. I, for one, was quick to embrace it. Subsequent studies provided mixed reviews as to the benefit to patients [2] and [3]. Case reports surfaced of patients experiencing cerebrospinal fluid leaks postoperatively when none were noted intraoperatively [4]. My own experience witnessed an increase in the incidence of recurrent disc herniation, presumably due to lack of scar to seal the annulus (although it clearly reduced adhesions/fibrosis on reoperation). In 2001, Gliatech, the company that brought the product to the market, declared bankruptcy, and Adcon-L is no longer available in the United States.






                        Originally posted by jsilver View Post
                        As usual you have no idea what you are talking about and, also as usual, you like to highlight only the negative. A complication with ADCON can occur when surgeons inadvertently puncture the dura when they perform discectomies. The product works so well that it inhibits the natural scarring process that would usually close small dural leaks. ADCON is being marketed by a company called BiosCompass. They are a wonderful group of people who recently acquired the rights to ADCON and they are committed to bringing a highly beneficial product back to the US market. ADCON works wonderfully well to prevent painful peripheral nerve adhesive entrapments, disfiguring and painful scarring between the skin and underlying structures after deep lacerations, tracheotomies etc (see British Journal paper), abdominal adhesions, pelvic adhesions and adhesions around implants. It works to prevent a devastating condition known as failed back syndrome that can develop after discectomies. And the uses go on and on. Anybody reading this post and knows of someone suffering with pain due to adhesion formation anywhere in the body should contact BiosCompass because they can possibly help with FDA compassionate use.
                        Last edited by crabbyshark; 24 Mar 2014, 3:10 AM.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          If Craig Rabb presumes that it's best to just leave the scar and tethering around a disc hernia for holding it in place to seal the annulus then he won't be using a new and only known drug for disc hernia "pain" shown here either.

                          http://www.seikagaku.co.jp/english/pdf/118.pdf

                          The generic name "Condoliase" is basically Chondroitinase.
                          http://www.ama-assn.org/resources/do...condoliase.pdf

                          Here's the new Phase 3 trial starting just late last month in the USA:
                          http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/sh...SI-6603&rank=3
                          Last edited by GRAMMY; 26 Mar 2014, 1:42 AM.
                          http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by GRAMMY View Post
                            If Craig Rabb presumes that it's best to leave the scar and tethering around a disc hernia to hold it in place for sealing the annulus then he won't be using other new drugs for disc hernia pain either.

                            http://www.seikagaku.co.jp/english/pdf/118.pdf

                            The generic name "Condoliase" is basically Chondroitinase.

                            Here's the new Phase 3 trial starting just late last month in the USA:
                            http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/sh...SI-6603&rank=3

                            Let's say this phase 3 trial proves effective,will that help move trials faster for it if they test it for another application such as Spinal cord injury .....actually do you know if this company has an interest in sci?Just wondering
                            "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

                            "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


                            2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
                            Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by lunasicc42 View Post
                              Let's say this phase 3 trial proves effective,will that help move trials faster for it if they test it for another application such as Spinal cord injury .....actually do you know if this company has an interest in sci?Just wondering
                              Safety is one thing and efficacy is another, but I think the results would help. The last I talked to them they just wanted to focus and make it through the disc hernia trials since they only had money to run one clinical trial at a time and they were already running disc hernia. I don't know if they'd be considering SCI next or not.
                              http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

                              Comment


                                #30
                                They've proven safety in the Phase 1 & 2 in Japan and completed a Phase 3 there. The Phase 3 starting here is a 1.25U, intradiscal injection, one time that's testing for pain in disc hernia.

                                What we're looking for in SCI is different. Spinal Research is funding the large animal studies in Ames Iowa and potentially looking at delivery and efficacy. These types of studies would be necessary in making critical decisions about going into human trials for a SCI.
                                http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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