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Frank Reynolds - Invivo 4/29/13 video

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    #31
    Originally posted by c473s View Post
    I have never heard him make that claim.
    He does. He had an incomplete injury.

    Fast forward to 3:30: "Long story short, I got myself back walking."

    stephen@bike-on.com

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      #32
      Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
      He does. He had an incomplete injury.

      Fast forward to 3:30: "Long story short, I got myself back walking."

      It must be difficult installing a scaffold in your own spinal cord?

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        #33
        Nevermind Frank Reynolds, the reason to be excited about Invivo is Dr Robert Langer. Dr Langer doesn't align himself with any project/research that doesn't have a high probability of success. Dr Langer also sits on the board of many companies. You never know, he may just be on the board of a company that has created a powerful Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) that cured mice paralyzed w/ms in JUST ONE WEEK, you never know. I can see Invivo collabarating with Stem Cells Inc, Neuralstem, Inc, Stemcyte, etc..............they have the scaffolding now just add some stem cells.
        "I'm manic as hell-
        But I'm goin' strong-
        Left my meds on the sink again-
        My head will be racing by lunchtime"

        <----Scott Weiland---->

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          #34
          Originally posted by nrf View Post
          It must be difficult installing a scaffold in your own spinal cord?
          Frank's story:
          Then, one day in 1995, Reynolds's wife brought home a VHS cassette of the movie Lorenzo's Oil. The film is about a couple that defy the medical establishment to discover a cure for their son's rare illness, and for Reynolds, it sparked an epiphany. "I thought, Jesus, I could do that," he says. And so began what Reynolds calls a "crusade" to regain the ability to walk. He set about learning everything he could about spinal cord injury, or SCI. Using a glacial early Internet connection, from his bed he tapped into the databases of university libraries; through supporters at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia, where he had been studying for a master's degree before his accident, he secured interlibrary loans of hard-to-find medical publications.

          Somewhere in those pages, Reynolds came across a theory -- a notion that has since gained credibility among many experts -- that by intensifying his physical rehab routine, he could reactivate dormant neural connections and make his spine come alive again. Instead of 45-minute sessions with a therapist three times a week, he began daily workouts that combined hours of aquatic therapy in a YMCA pool with as much time as he could handle on a treadmill. Supporting himself with his upper body, he grimaced through the pain and simply forced his legs to move. After three months, he could walk a quarter of a mile a day; after a year, he could manage five. He was now able to drive himself, using both feet. He removed his body cast and got ready to go back to work.

          Complete article
          stephen@bike-on.com

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            #35
            Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
            He does. He had an incomplete injury.

            Fast forward to 3:30: "Long story short, I got myself back walking."
            He said he used local reorganization. The spinal cord has it's own brain and will reorganize itself if the spinal cord is healthy and has good tissue.
            He didn't inject himself with a poly scaffolding or anything like that...

            If there was a chronic study published, it should have been on the InVivo site but none exist on the research publish list.
            Last edited by GRAMMY; 1 May 2013, 11:59 PM.
            http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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              #36
              incomplete injury with enough good connections left to make it work. Great for him not so great for people not as lucky with more complete injuries. Still I hope that his company helps people get out of chairs
              Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

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                #37
                Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
                He does. He had an incomplete injury.

                Fast forward to 3:30: "Long story short, I got myself back walking."
                Well dang. Quite a story.
                Last edited by c473s; 2 May 2013, 6:00 AM.

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                  #38
                  It's nutty that a guy who so readily perpetuates the "hard work is the cure for paralysis" myth is somehow a leader in the hunt for a scaffold-based cure. Shouldn't a bibliography of the books and websites he read be adequate to get us up and running? I know that would be tough to monetize, but I hope that at the very least Invivo's treatment combines the scaffold with a "Clockwork Orange"-style forced exposure to the wisdom contained in the Protocols of the Elders of Reynolds.

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                    #39
                    In the first video about 5:40 he talks about great results in chronic injured monkeys. Can someone back that up or is he making assumptions based on the acute one?
                    Debating on CareCure is like participating in the special-olympics. You may win, but you're still disabled.

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                      #40
                      My turn to revive a long-dormant thread. I am just a few days away from my 37th anniverSCIry and was reflecting on how little progress has been made toward a cure in all this time. I think like many SCI old-timers, my interest in cure research just plain wore out. Something made me think of Frank Reynolds, the charismatic founder and CEO of InVivo Therapeutics and his bold (bullshit) vision touting breakthroughs in cure for chronic SCIs. This thread and linked article below may be of some interest to those who never tire of cautionary tales about all the predators purveying false hope for $$ on SCIs and part of the reason, perhaps, for why none of us (chronic completes, anyway) are up and out of our wheelchairs.


                      https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipelin...vestment-story

                      >>I won’t detail every twist and turn, but let’s just say that Reynolds left InVivo in the summer of 2013, leaving quite a trail behind him. High-level employees were walking out the door (or threatening to) if they had to continue working with him – Reynolds was almost a caricature of a hard-driving, profane, abusive boss. And he himself was complaining to Langer and everyone who would listen that he wasn’t being properly compensated on just $545k/year, but it appears that he was spending company money on Broadway shows, first-class air travel, and visits to the finest strip joints up and down the East coast (these expenses are currently being litigated). Oh, and he was never in that terrible car crash. He hurt his back unloading a snack-cake delivery truck in 1991. And he was never paralyzed, although he did have complications from back surgery, but that’s not quite as good a story, is it?<<
                      stephen@bike-on.com

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                        #41
                        May he rot unhappily ever after.

                        https://www.justice.gov/usao-ma/pr/b...nd-obstruction

                        >>Biotech Company CEO Convicted of Securities Fraud and Obstruction


                        BOSTON – The chief executive officer of PixarBio Corp., a Boston-based biotech company, was convicted today of defrauding the company’s investors and obstructing an SEC investigation.

                        Frank Reynolds, 57, of Newton, was convicted of by a federal jury, following a three-week trial, of one count of securities fraud and three counts of obstructing an agency proceeding. Senior United States District Judge Douglas P. Woodlock scheduled sentencing for Feb. 6, 2020.
                        The jury convicted Reynolds of defrauding PixarBio investors through manipulative trading of the company’s shares and false and misleading statements about the company’s finances, the timeline for FDA approval of its key drug, and Reynolds’s own background, which he claimed included curing his own paralysis. In fact, the evidence at trial showed that Reynolds was never paralyzed.<<

                        continued.
                        stephen@bike-on.com

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