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New Procedure Repairs Severed Nerves in Minutes, Restoring Limb Use in Days or Weeks

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    New Procedure Repairs Severed Nerves in Minutes, Restoring Limb Use in Days or Weeks

    ScienceDaily (Feb. 3, 2012) — American scientists believe a new procedure to repair severed nerves could result in patients recovering in days or weeks, rather than months or years. The team used a cellular mechanism similar to that used by many invertebrates to repair damage to nerve axons.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0203092423.htm

    Their results were recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience Research.

    "We have developed a procedure which can repair severed nerves within minutes so that the behavior they control can be partially restored within days and often largely restored within two to four weeks," said Professor George Bittner from the University of Texas. "If further developed in clinical trials this approach would be a great advance on current procedures that usually imperfectly restore lost function within months at best."

    The team studied the mechanisms all animal cells use to repair damage to their membranes and focused on invertebrates, which have a superior ability to regenerate nerve axons compared to mammals. An axon is a long extension arising from a nerve cell body that communicates with other nerve cells or with muscles.

    #2
    peripheral nervous system?

    Comment


      #3
      simply wow!!

      Comment


        #4
        I would love to read the original research papers. If anyone has access, please forward it to me.

        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...657602A.d03t04

        Thanks for posting patecatl!

        Comment


          #5
          PEG is old as F@#$, but we must not try it in humans, status quo is at stake!
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGuYUoijwOQ

          Comment


            #6
            Those videos were from 2001

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Dmitriy View Post
              PEG is old as F@#$, but we must not try it in humans, status quo is at stake!
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGuYUoijwOQ
              PEG?
              I don't see anything that indicates that this is the same type of research, besides in dealing with SCI or PNI.

              Anyone up on this?

              Comment


                #8
                Not the original article, but with valuable details.

                "Professor Bittner's team had discovered earlier that when a plasma membrane is damaged, a calcium-mediated healing mechanism starts to draw small vesicles toward the site of the injury. Vesicles are small sacks made of lipid membranes which provide the material needed to repair an injured plasma membrane. However, when the vesicles are attracted to the site of a severed axon, both ends of the axon are sealed off by this repair mechanism, preventing regrowth of the nerve.

                To avoid this problem, the first step of the Texas group's nerve repair procedure is to bathe the area of the severed nerve with a calcium-free saline solution. By removing calcium from the injured axons, premature healing of the axon ends by this vesicle-based repair mechanism is prevented and even reversed. The damaged axons remain open, and can more easily be reattached. The calcium-free solution also contains antioxidants (e.g., methylene blue) to prevent degenerative changes in the axon and nerve
                " [source]

                sounds beautiful but: "While the procedure developed by Bittner's group will not apply to the central nervous system or spinal cord injuries, the procedure offers hope to people whose futures include accidents involving damaged nerves."
                Last edited by cypresss; 8 Feb 2012, 7:41 AM.
                This signature left intentionally blank.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Dmitriy View Post
                  PEG is old as F@#$, but we must not try it in humans, status quo is at stake!
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGuYUoijwOQ


                  That is where we went Wong . Should have being born with 4 legs and a tale
                  AS I SIT HERE IN MY CHAIR . I LOOK OUT UPON THE GROUND .I WONDER WILL I EVER GET UP AND WALK A ROUND ??


                  http://justadollarplease.org

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by cypresss View Post
                    sounds beautiful but: "While the procedure developed by Bittner's group will not apply to the central nervous system or spinal cord injuries, the procedure offers hope to people whose futures include accidents involving damaged nerves."
                    This sounds a little better: "Baby steps is the nature of the business," said English. "Right now we are in mammals. We are going to move it right from the sciatic nerve and peripheral nerve into the spinal cord and keep pushing until we go all the way."
                    http://www.khou.com/news/UT-research...138860469.html

                    Comment


                      #11
                      "Understanding and treating injuries and diseases that affect the brain and the spinal cord are the final frontier in medicine – and that’s where Molly Shoichet is concentrating her research explorations."
                      "One of Shoichet’s goals is to create devices that help stimulate the body’s existing stem cells to repair tissue damaged by stroke or traumatic injury." (http://www.chrcrm.org/en/rotm/prof-molly-shoichet)
                      "We have several ongoing studies with HAMC (biopolymer blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose) for both local delivery to the spinal cord and brain; and stem cell delivery to the spinal cord, brain and retina. We are optimistic about HAMC and have patented the composition of matter and its use in several different contexts. We are actively seeking commercialization partners (in collaboration with MaRS Innovation) so that we can realize the potential that HAMC has for use in diseases and disorders of the central nervous system." (http://www.cc-crs.com/shoichet.htm).

                      jsilver, your thoughts about Prof. Molly Shoichet's research activity would be appreciated.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by kivi66 View Post
                        "Understanding and treating injuries and diseases that affect the brain and the spinal cord are the final frontier in medicine – and that’s where Molly Shoichet is concentrating her research explorations."
                        "One of Shoichet’s goals is to create devices that help stimulate the body’s existing stem cells to repair tissue damaged by stroke or traumatic injury." (http://www.chrcrm.org/en/rotm/prof-molly-shoichet)
                        "We have several ongoing studies with HAMC (biopolymer blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose) for both local delivery to the spinal cord and brain; and stem cell delivery to the spinal cord, brain and retina. We are optimistic about HAMC and have patented the composition of matter and its use in several different contexts. We are actively seeking commercialization partners (in collaboration with MaRS Innovation) so that we can realize the potential that HAMC has for use in diseases and disorders of the central nervous system." (http://www.cc-crs.com/shoichet.htm).

                        jsilver, your thoughts about Prof. Molly Shoichet's research activity would be appreciated.
                        OK, considering your dislike to "speculate broadly", I specify the query: 1)how closely Choichet's body's existing stem cells research connected with Anderson-Cummings's findings? and 2)whether effect of PEG-FGF2 application has something in common with chondroitinase administration?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I am not familiar with the particular types of stem cell that Molly is using but she is focusing on delivery systems that appear to be necessary to support the survival of the cells that she is injecting. The Anderson-Cummings cells survive just fine after injection and they want the cells to disperse to areas of demyelination rather than constraining them within a scaffold. There are a wide variety of scaffold/biopolymer labs around the world and the Shoichet lab is among the finest. However, it should be noted that biopolymers appear to manifest their most profound effects at acute stages after injury. I know of no credible evidence that by themselves such scaffold materials function to promote regeneration at chronic stages. The use of FGF is interesting and, indeed, my lab has used FGF as part of a combinatorial strategy along with ch'ase and peripheral nerve autografts to bridge a complete lesion of the spinal cord at acute stages. FGF appears to work by stimulating axons to grow straight rather that in a branching pattern which is the typical effect of most other trophic molecules such as NGF, BDNF or NT3. FGF also causes reactive astrocytes to adopt a more bipolar shape and may help align cells in the scar which, in turn, may foster better axon growth across a lesion. FGF works synergistically with ch'ase but does not act in the same as the enzyme does at all. The Henrich Cheng clinical trial is using just FGF in fibrin, with some modest success.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by jsilver View Post
                            I am not familiar with the particular types of stem cell that Molly is using but she is focusing on delivery systems that appear to be necessary to support the survival of the cells that she is injecting. The Anderson-Cummings cells survive just fine after injection and they want the cells to disperse to areas of demyelination rather than constraining them within a scaffold. There are a wide variety of scaffold/biopolymer labs around the world and the Shoichet lab is among the finest. However, it should be noted that biopolymers appear to manifest their most profound effects at acute stages after injury. I know of no credible evidence that by themselves such scaffold materials function to promote regeneration at chronic stages. The use of FGF is interesting and, indeed, my lab has used FGF as part of a combinatorial strategy along with ch'ase and peripheral nerve autografts to bridge a complete lesion of the spinal cord at acute stages. FGF appears to work by stimulating axons to grow straight rather that in a branching pattern which is the typical effect of most other trophic molecules such as NGF, BDNF or NT3. FGF also causes reactive astrocytes to adopt a more bipolar shape and may help align cells in the scar which, in turn, may foster better axon growth across a lesion. FGF works synergistically with ch'ase but does not act in the same as the enzyme does at all. The Henrich Cheng clinical trial is using just FGF in fibrin, with some modest success.
                            Dr.Silver, thanks a lot for polite and comprehensive reply.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by cljanney View Post
                              I would love to read the original research papers. If anyone has access, please forward it to me.

                              http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...657602A.d03t04

                              Thanks for posting patecatl!
                              Here you go- It's peripheral nerves, so not so exciting...

                              Comment

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