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Restorative Therapies of Spinal Cord Injury: Part 1 Rehabilitative Therapies

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  • Restorative Therapies of Spinal Cord Injury: Part 1 Rehabilitative Therapies

    I have been flooded recently by many enquiries for people regarding the therapies that they can partake in now and what therapies will become available so that they can make decisions concerning what do. To address these questions, I have decided to start a series of articles on the three R's of spinal cord injury therapy: rehabilitative, regenerative, and replacement. The first of this series of articles (which will be updated regularly) was just posted at the carecure.rutgers.edu site:

    http://carecure.rutgers.edu/spinewir...itativeRx.html

    Please do post comments and questions here about the articles, as well as what you think should be included. This should be a community effort. I don't have all the answers.

    [This message was edited by Wise Young on Apr 02, 2002 at 09:16 AM.]

  • #2
    Excellent, Wise!

    _____________
    Tough times don't last - tough people do.
    _____________

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    • #3
      Whew, a response in 3 minutes... that is the fastest that I have seen on this site. Thanks. I was just thinking that this would be a good structure for DA's and Chris's proposals to put together a series of documents that represent a consensus of the community concerning the progress and promise of othe field. Although the article lists me as the author (because I believe in responsibility in what is written), I would love to have these article authored by the whole community. The various points and views should be honed, documented, and tightened, so that they represent both the reality and hope of our community. Wise.

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      • #4
        Super,großartig,Dr.Young.That is the right way.

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        • #5
          rehab and dino

          "Standing. Physicians have long known that immobilization causes bone and muscle loss, as well as reduced cardiovascular and pulmonary capacity".exercise is helpfull for disabled and non disabled community.THÄ°S Ä°S TRUE

          "Rehabilitative therapies can restore much more function than most people think" THIS ISNT TRUE.

          1)THERE WAS A PERSON WHOSE NAME IS XXXX( I DIDINT REMEMBER IT NOW ).HE SWIM FROM ENGLAND TO FRANCH (BY PASSING THE XXXX SEA)

          HE ENTERED THE SEA FROM ENGLAND BY MEANS OF SOMEBODYS HELP. UNFORTUNATELY HE COULDNT GAIN ANY WALKING ABILITY WHEN HE ARRIVES THE FRENCH.

          I BELIEVE THAT IF WE ASSUME THAT HE CAN SWIM THE ENTIRE OCEAN PROBABLY HIS POSITION IS STILL BOUNDED WHELCHAIR.

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          • #6
            Excellent article. I'm already looking forward to the next installment.

            In the context of rehabilitative therapy, I think it's important to remind people about the crucial role that nutrition plays in the body's ability to heal and function properly.

            Anyone seeking increased fitness and performance levels should give careful consideration to their eating habits and any nutritional deficiencies that they might have. I recommend periodic screening and consultation with a qualified nutritionist.

            By first creating a healthy physiological environment and then subjecting our bodies to increasing levels of physical demands, we can establish individual performance standards that can be used to help determine which future therapies will be personally optimal.

            In the case of SCI's attempting to gauge the progress of their personal recovery, it's especially important to eliminate as many variables as possible. Healthy habits help to provide a clearer performance picture.

            Optimal health and conditioning should also serve to provide accurate benchmarks by which to, determine the need for, and judge the true effectiveness of, regenerative and replacement therapies to come.
            Know Thyself

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            • #7
              Supported locomotor Exercise

              How can someone find supported locomotor exercise equipment?

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              • #8
                Dr Young, just want to say thanks for pulling the info together into one (eventual) document - I've been reading many of the posts on this site for a month or two now, trying to learn what might best help my son both now & in the future, and my head has been cluttered with confusion as a result! Your summarising everything will definitely help clear some of that confusion.

                Cheers,
                Mum

                Life is what happens to us while we're making other plans. - John Lennon
                Life is what happens to us while we're making other plans. - John Lennon

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                • #9
                  What a terrific article. Thank you Dr. Young. I have taken so much advice from this forum and fought to have some of these things done with my son in rehab. (I don't think they like me very much where my son is.) After I show them this article, they'll like me even less. Oh well, not there to make friends. Thanks again.

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                  • #10
                    In response to your situation Iway, be as agressive as possible. When my accident happened we were absolutely taken aback by all that was happening, and my therapists didn't seem to be offering any alternatives or useful advice. To be honest being hurt in Montana was like being hurt in a 3rd world environment. Anyway, if they are not willing to help your son the way he should be, jerk him out and ship him to somewhere that will. It'll make a thousand percent difference in his recovery.

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                    • #11
                      Bench

                      Try www.litegait.com

                      This is a good place to start. Or www.projectwalk.com

                      Onward and Upward!

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                      • #12
                        Thanks Cowboy_MT. One PT my son has told him that the standing table was only "dessert" and that he HAD to do the " meat and potatoes" first i.e. mat skills, transfers..etc. When I found this out I told this PT that our family prefers " dessert" first and meat and potatoes last. I show them every article I can find and it is still the same crap from them..get ready for life in a wheelchair, 'cuz like the army, there's no life like it. EricTexley once advised me to sue the doctors for discouraging my son from walking, well, I'll tell you who is going to get sued is these people who don't try any available means to get my son on his feet. There is so much positive information on these therapies I don't see as they can argue the benefits.

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                        • #13
                          I totally empathisize with your frustration. I went through the same thing BUT depending on his injury (complete/incomplete, etc) he will likely be spending at least a few years in a wheelchair.

                          It is necessary to learn these skills... the time to learn floor to chair transfer and all about pressure sores is not when he is back home.

                          By all means, push on these deadbeats, do suspended treadmill training, etc... just be realistic. All the physio, motivation & money in the world doesn't mean shit if your injury is bad enough. Then you gotta wait for the science to move from rats to humans. This is what we're all waiting for.
                          "Oh yeah life goes on
                          Long after the thrill of livin is gone"

                          John Cougar Mellencamp

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                          • #14
                            I agree Mike and I don't interfere with that part of his rehab and my son doesn't ease up when he is doing his transfers or trying to educate himself on what he needs to do to survive this. All I am trying to do is try to enhance his rehab with the therapies that have helped others. I just want to make sure he has had the chance to improve by all means possible. That is not asking too much.

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                            • #15
                              Iway I know what you are talking about. Why can;t they be a lot more aggressive with somebody who is only 16. They were doing the same thing with my son who is 16 and we took him out of rehab and are working at home. Does your son have any movement at all. Good Luck with this BULLSHIT!
                              "When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. That's my religion." — Abraham Lincoln

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