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Dr. Ramon Cueto -- Primate Studies Have Begun

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  • Dr. Ramon Cueto -- Primate Studies Have Begun

    I've got the goods everybody. I sent Dr. Ramon Cueto an e-mail and here's the response I got. It's pretty self-explanatory. This is so exciting.

    Dear Allen:

    We have already started with primate experiments. So far we have obtained some very exciting results that were presented in the last Neuroscience meeting and some news that will be presented soon. We will continue these experiments in primates because our aim is to test if OEG is a suitable technique for humans. If we succeed in our goal we will start clinical trials.

    Sincerely,

    Almudena
    Allen Krupar
    e-mail: petition(NO SPAM)@cordtalk.org
    web site: http://www.cordtalk.org/oeg/

    ~~See You On the Dark Side of the Moon http://www.cordtalk.org/darkside.jpg

    Cleveland Rocks!!

  • #2
    Al

    Next time you email her it would be great to find out what injury model they're using. The transection model used in their rat studies is not comparable to the contusion injuries most of us have. This is the last remaining cloud hanging over OEG research, IMO. It looks hopeful for even chronic injury but I have yet to hear about effectiveness with contusion injuries. Dr. Raisman says it will work but I'm not aware of animal data with contusion injuries.

    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~
    ~See you at the CareCure-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

    Comment


    • #3
      Somebody Should Ask Her Which Models She Is Studying

      It's not like I know her personally. Somebody else should send her e-mail and ask her which models she is studying. You know, it's only a matter of time before they get to a contusion model because very few people have severed spinal cords. Although, obviously, they're going to start with acute models.

      Would anybody like to contact Dr Almudena Ramón-Cueto or her lab? Here's her e-mail: aramon@ibv.csic.es You can also try: aramon@cbm.csic.es

      Somebody should also contact Dr. Raisman and get his input.

      Allen
      baudi73@yahoo.com
      Allen Krupar
      e-mail: petition(NO SPAM)@cordtalk.org
      web site: http://www.cordtalk.org/oeg/

      ~~See You On the Dark Side of the Moon http://www.cordtalk.org/darkside.jpg

      Cleveland Rocks!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Al

        I will e-mail her as well.

        Keep up the good work.

        Comment


        • #5
          OEG Primate Studies

          Thanks for this great bit of information. Sounds promising, especially since the work is with primates. Where is this research being done? I did a search and found some information about the research. Are they in Canada? They must be further along than the research findings on OEG'S that Dr. Young just posted, or is it totally different work? Seems like alot of good research here and abroad lately, thank God !

          Comment


          • #6
            My Birthday

            What a great birthday present - thanks for the great news.

            Deb
            "Save the last dance for me!"

            Comment


            • #7
              I've Got a Big Mouth -- But Here Goes

              There is also another primates study being conducted at the University of California San Diego. The principal researcher is Dr. Mark Tuszynski. He's experimenting with neurotrophins in a primate model. I sent him e-mail as well. Hopefully we'll get a response. I'm sure that at a certain point the researchers are going to become secretive about their work once it comes time to apply for patents. Dr. Tuszynski is also studying proteoglycans. He has a paper coming out in April in the Journal of Neuroscience.


              NG2 is a Major Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan Produced After Spinal Cord Injury and Is Expressed by Macrophages and Oligodendrocyte Progenitors

              Leonard L. Jones, Yu Yamaguchi, William B. Stallcup, and Mark H. Tuszynski


              Is Nogo a proteoglycan? What does NG2 stand for? I also have word from Dr. Jerry Silver's lab. They are experimenting with his microtransplant technique using olfactory ensheathing glia and other candidates for transplantation in spinal cord injury. I forgot to mention the last time I brought up Dr. Jerry Silver that there is an important study going to be published in Nature very soon. It involves the digestion of proteoglycans, I think, in the lesioned spinal cord. If somebody gets to it before me please post it. The research was conducted by Elizabeth Bradbury et. al.

              Allen
              baudi73@yahoo.com
              Allen Krupar
              e-mail: petition(NO SPAM)@cordtalk.org
              web site: http://www.cordtalk.org/oeg/

              ~~See You On the Dark Side of the Moon http://www.cordtalk.org/darkside.jpg

              Cleveland Rocks!!

              Comment


              • #8
                I shouldn't get too excited because she told me 3 months ago that they have only started some preliminary studies with primates and that they will start primate trials this spring.They will also last 2 years and if they are succesfull the next step will be human trials so they are still far away from human trials.Also she obtains the cells from the olfactory bulb which method hopefully will be history soon.I am very surprised that she said that "We have already started with primate experiments. So far we have obtained some very exciting results that were presented in the last Neuroscience meeting" because as far as I know she only achieved results in rat experiments and never has implanted OEG in primates.She has succesfully removed the olfactory bulb from primates and extracted OEG cells from it.Maybe she is referring to that what she has presentated in the last meeting.But if she has indeed presented exciting results with primate experiments Dr.Young could correct me, but that would highly surprise me.

                LJ W; The primate trials will be carried out in Madrid

                But of course it is interesting and I am curious which news she will present soon.

                Comment


                • #9
                  press release from 27-10-2001

                  They apply monkeys the experiment that allowed to walk to paraplegic rats.

                  It is the indispensable previous step for the transfer of the technique to human.

                  Agencies Valladolid

                  The Meeting of Castile and León will finance, with 50 million pesetas, the transfer to monkeys of the experiment that got, for the first time in the world that paraplegic rats with the totally cut spinal marrow walk again. If the tests in monkeys are successful, the hospitals castellanoleoneses will be the first ones in practicing this therapy type.
                  The investigation, guided by the Superior Council of Scientific Investigations (CSIC), he/she will be carried out in the Ability of Medicine of the Autonomous University of Madrid. The director of the project, the scientific Almudena Ramón Cueto, explained yesterday that the technique consists on the autotrasplante of cells located in the encircling glía of the bulb olfatorio from the animal to the damaged spinal marrow, so that this last one is regenerated. If the experiment has in the primates the same success that in the rats, it will be repaired and the injured axones and the paraplegic monkeys will recover the voluntary movement of the paws and the sensibility, that is to say, they will be able to walk again.
                  The results obtained in rats, the investigator explained, they have allowed the total recovery of the rodents and they constitute the best functional recovery and repair histológica described up to now in mature mammals with complete medullary lesion". On the planning of this new experimental phase whose duration and foreseen financing is of two years its director he/she said that until final of 2.001 they will be carried out the preparations and in spring, if everything goes well they will be carried out the transplants.

                  Injure chronic

                  The experimentation with monkeys is indispensable, like previous step to the application of this technique in human, because the nervous system of the rodents is not as complete as that of the non human primates that have it similar to us". Although this type of you only implant had been successful when they are carried out nothing else to happen the lesion, the expert trust in that the investigations even can to treat the chronic lesions and to discover pharmacological treatments that don't necessarily bear the marrow transplant.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    NG2 is a high molecular weight proteoglycan of the chondroitin-sulfate family. It is expressed by oligodendroglial cells. Neurons will not grow on culture dishes coated with NG2. When NG2 is mixed with other cell adhesion molecules that are known to promote axonal growth, the axons will not grow as well as on the cell adhesion molecules alone. NG2 is a particular type of transmembrane proteoglycan that is expressed on the surface of cells, particularly glial cells where it may even serve as a promoter of growth under certain circumstances http://www.glycoforum.gr.jp/science/...an/PGA07E.html

                    Levine, J.M. (1994) Increased expression of the NG2 proteoglycan after brain injury. J. Neurosci., 14:4716-4730. Dou, C. and J.M. Levine (1995) Differential effects of glycosaminoglycans on neurite growth on laminin and L1 substrates. J. Neurosci., 15:8053-8066.

                    You can find details about proteoglycans at the following web site http://www.uku.fi/laitokset/anat/PG/ng2_pg.htm

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      La Doctora Almudena Ramon Cueto

                      I UNDERSTAND THAT ALMUDENA WILL ATTEND AT THE CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR TREATMENT OF NEUROLOGICAL DISEASES AT THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES , MARCH 15 - 16, 2002
                      http://neuroregeneration.org/CMT III.htm

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                      • #12
                        La Doctora Almudena Ramon Cueto

                        I´M AFFRAID IT IS NOT SO, SORRY

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                        • #13
                          Running in circles......

                          Sure, Almudena referred to her paper which she presented last November:

                          699.10 Wednesday, Nov. 14, 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM Poster OLFACTORY ENSHEATHING GLIA FROM ADULT MACAQUE MONKEYS: CHARACTERIZATION AND ABSENCE OF SIDE EFFECTS AFTER BULBECTOMY. C-17 A. Ramon-Cueto1*; C. Cavada2 Laboratory of Neural Regeneration, Institute of Biomedicine (CSIC) Olfactory Ensheathing Glia (OEG) have unique properties and constitute a promising new approach for the treatment of spinal cord injuries in adult mammals. Since previous work has been done mainly in rats, we set to obtain olfactory bulbs from adult macaque monkeys in order to culture and characterize their OEG. We developed a surgical procedure to safely obtain one olfactory bulb from young adult Macaca Nemestrina, with no injury to adjacent frontal cortex, the contralateral bulb, nor to the contents of the orbit. From the day of surgery to date (fifteen-eighteen months after bulbectomy), these animals have not presented any behavioral or health complication. OEG were cultured from the olfactory bulbs of three adult macaques. These cells divided in culture and one olfactory bulb provided enough cell numbers for transplantation into the spinal cord of one animal. The macaque OEG presented the same morphological and immunocytochemical features as the adult rat OEG. These cells expressed GFAP, S100, O4, p75 NGFR, L1, and laminin. The preservation of OEG phenotypic features between species suggests that, most likely, OEG from primates might also preserve axonal growth-promoting properties. The absence of surgical complications in the bulbectomized monkeys, and the ability to easily obtain large numbers of OEG from them, open the possibility of OEG autotransplantation to repair the spinal cords of primates. Thus, a novel therapeutic procedure to treat this condition in humans may be foreseen.

                          How many times have we been told by Dr. Young that is difficult to harvest OEG cells for autologous transplants. Obviously Almudena was able to do that and I heard that she spent some time with a cell transplantation expert in an EU-country in order to learn how she can transplant the cells the best way to the lesion site of the injured monkey cord.
                          Anyway, Almudena's OEG cell technology looks very promising and we are only a couple of years away from human trials - a therapy that has been decently tested on primates and therefore, will meet FDA standards.

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