Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Recovery from chronic spinal cord contusion after Nogo receptor intervention

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Recovery from chronic spinal cord contusion after Nogo receptor intervention

    A post in manouli's thread (#125) led me to follow up with Dr. Strittmatter since I have spoken with him in the past and he is not far from my home.
    I was not aware that his lab was doing any work with chronic spinal cord injury even though he has been working with Nogo for sometime. In any event, a pharmacological only approach which demonstrates functional improvement in chronic SCI is significant even if it is demonstrated on rats.
    The intellectual property has already been licensed by a pharmaceutical startup. Perhaps the results of Novartis's Nogo trial could be used to help accelerate this approach.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ana.22527/abstract

    #2
    Originally posted by litespeed4 View Post
    A post in manouli's thread (#125) led me to follow up with Dr. Strittmatter since I have spoken with him in the past and he is not far from my home.
    I was not aware that his lab was doing any work with chronic spinal cord injury even though he has been working with Nogo for sometime. In any event, a pharmacological only approach which demonstrates functional improvement in chronic SCI is significant even if it is demonstrated on rats.
    The intellectual property has already been licensed by a pharmaceutical startup. Perhaps the results of Novartis's Nogo trial could be used to help accelerate this approach.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ana.22527/abstract

    It saies:

    In chronic rat spinal contusion, NgR1 decoy treatment from 4-6 months after injury results in 29% (10 of 35) of rats recovering weight-bearing status compared to 0% (0 of 29) of control rats (P<0.05)

    That is a great recovery. I wonder why no one has been able to get the same results before as NgR1 has been around for long time..
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by paolocipolla View Post
      It saies:

      In chronic rat spinal contusion, NgR1 decoy treatment from 4-6 months after injury results in 29% (10 of 35) of rats recovering weight-bearing status compared to 0% (0 of 29) of control rats (P<0.05)

      That is a great recovery. I wonder why no one has been able to get the same results before as NgR1 has been around for long time..
      I have read the complete paper and the answer is that they did not just suppress Nogo alone but also suppressed MAG and OMG. While there were benefits from suppressing Nogo alone or with either MAG or OMG, the best results came from suppressing all three.

      Comment


        #4
        Many months (maybe years?) have passed since the last news about Nogo and its aplication in SCI. Is good to see they are still working in treatments around it.
        -Ramps in buildings are necessary, but it would be usefull to have another ones for people (mind/heart).....

        -Hoc non pereo habebo fortior me

        Comment


          #5
          Should come to trials on humans now.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by litespeed4 View Post
            I have read the complete paper and the answer is that they did not just suppress Nogo alone but also suppressed MAG and OMG. While there were benefits from suppressing Nogo alone or with either MAG or OMG, the best results came from suppressing all three.
            Thanks,

            it makes more sense now.
            In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

            Comment


              #7
              Dear Dr Wise i have just come from Switerland attending a screening process for the stem cell inc trial alas i failed the exclusion criteria due to a sore infected with MRSA. However i have had an indept conversation with Dr Armin Curt about SCI treatment and cure. I have come to the conclusion that there will never be a cure but if so a treatment designed for the individual patients needs. Injecting stem cells into the injury site and just letting them bridge the gap, and regenerate is too simplistic but thats my opinion. Dr Curt is thinking about using a scaffold procedure later on, while in Balgrist Switerland their are studies going on about the Nogo effect. i am not technical could you please explain further.

              Peterf

              Comment

              Working...
              X