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    Dec
    03,
    2019
    A common drug could help restore limb function after spinal cord injury
    In mouse study, nerve pain drug gabapentin promotes regeneration of neural circuits
    Follow me on Twitter (opens in new window) Add me on LinkedIn (opens in new window) Emily Caldwell
    Ohio State News
    caldwell.151@osu.edu
    Long-term treatment with gabapentin, a commonly prescribed drug for nerve pain, could help restore upper limb function after a spinal cord injury, new research in mice suggests.
    In the study, mice treated with gabapentin regained roughly 60 percent of forelimb function in a skilled walking test, compared to restoration of approximately 30 percent of forelimb function in mice that received a placebo.
    The drug blocks activity of a protein that has a key role in the growth process of axons, the long, slender extensions of nerve cell bodies that transmit messages. The protein stops axon growth at times when synapses form, allowing transmission of information to another nerve cell.
    The research showed that gabapentin blocks the protein from putting on its brakes, which effectively allowed axons to grow longer after injury.
    more...
    https://news.osu.edu/a-common-drug-c...l-cord-injury/

    Comment


      Originally posted by manouli View Post
      Dec
      03,
      2019
      A common drug could help restore limb function after spinal cord injury
      In mouse study, nerve pain drug gabapentin promotes regeneration of neural circuits
      Follow me on Twitter (opens in new window) Add me on LinkedIn (opens in new window) Emily Caldwell
      Ohio State News
      caldwell.151@osu.edu
      Long-term treatment with gabapentin, a commonly prescribed drug for nerve pain, could help restore upper limb function after a spinal cord injury, new research in mice suggests.
      In the study, mice treated with gabapentin regained roughly 60 percent of forelimb function in a skilled walking test, compared to restoration of approximately 30 percent of forelimb function in mice that received a placebo.
      The drug blocks activity of a protein that has a key role in the growth process of axons, the long, slender extensions of nerve cell bodies that transmit messages. The protein stops axon growth at times when synapses form, allowing transmission of information to another nerve cell.
      The research showed that gabapentin blocks the protein from putting on its brakes, which effectively allowed axons to grow longer after injury.
      more...
      https://news.osu.edu/a-common-drug-c...l-cord-injury/

      Spinal cord injury assessment and treatment the focus of new Adelaide clinical trial
      By Helen Frost
      Posted Sun at 2:32pm
      An on-field collision during round two of the 1975 VFL season changed Mr Sachse's life, leaving him a quadriplegic.
      He still remembers the long process of having his injury assessed.
      "They used a pinprick to test what level of injury you are. That still happens today," he said.
      "So nothing's changed in those 44 years as far as the diagnostic tool is concerned."
      read....
      https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-...laide/11776890

      Comment


        Originally posted by manouli View Post
        Spinal cord injury assessment and treatment the focus of new Adelaide clinical trial
        By Helen Frost
        Posted Sun at 2:32pm
        An on-field collision during round two of the 1975 VFL season changed Mr Sachse's life, leaving him a quadriplegic.
        He still remembers the long process of having his injury assessed.
        "They used a pinprick to test what level of injury you are. That still happens today," he said.
        "So nothing's changed in those 44 years as far as the diagnostic tool is concerned."
        read....
        https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-...laide/11776890


        Stroke Drug Boosts Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury in Rats
        December 17, 2019 | Heather Buschman, PhD

        Four months after treating them, Yasuhiro Shiga, MD, PhD, checked on his rats. Walking into the lab, he carried minimal expectations. Treating spinal cord injuries with stem cells had been tried by many people, many times before, with modest success at best. The endpoint he was specifically there to measure ? pain levels ? hadn?t seemed to budge in past efforts.
        read...
        https://health.ucsd.edu/news/release...y-in-rats.aspx

        Comment


          Originally posted by manouli View Post
          Stroke Drug Boosts Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury in Rats
          December 17, 2019 | Heather Buschman, PhD

          Four months after treating them, Yasuhiro Shiga, MD, PhD, checked on his rats. Walking into the lab, he carried minimal expectations. Treating spinal cord injuries with stem cells had been tried by many people, many times before, with modest success at best. The endpoint he was specifically there to measure ? pain levels ? hadn?t seemed to budge in past efforts.
          read...
          https://health.ucsd.edu/news/release...y-in-rats.aspx


          https://twitter.com/topeka_magazine
          Spinal Cord Injury: Could This Ease to Speed Relief?

          Stay up-to-date with Spinal Cord Injury Market research offered by HTF MI. Check how key trends and emerging drivers are shaping this industry growth.
          HTF Market Intelligence released a new research report of 209 pages on title ?Spinal Cord Injury ? Pipeline Review, H2 2019? with detailed analysis, forecast and strategies. The study covers key regions and important players such as AbbVie Inc, Algiax Pharmaceuticals GmbH, Aposcience
          read....
          https://www.topeka-magazine.com/news...A1IFP4H3HX_2t6

          Comment


            Woman with Spinal Cord Injury Finds Relief at Danbury Hospital
            Danbury Hospital neurosurgeon and care team helped New Yorker maintain her quality of life after she broke her neck
            By Amy, Nonprofit

            Summary:
            ⦁ Katherine (Kathy) Wenning tripped and broke her neck when she was at her weekend home in Washington, Connecticut. Kathy and her husband, Michael, knew she needed emergency care. They weren't sure where to go because they live in Manhattan, and they've never needed urgent medical attention while staying in Washington.
            ⦁ Kathy and Michael consulted with friends from New York who also spend time in Connecticut and they recommended Danbury Hospital.
            ⦁ Kathy had successful surgery to treat her severe spinal cord injury, followed by extensive occupational therapy and physical therapy.
            ⦁ Today, Kathy is fully functional and has been able to maintain her active lifestyle

            more....
            https://patch.com/connecticut/danbur...nbury-hospital

            Comment


              Happy new year!

              Originally posted by manouli View Post
              woman with spinal cord injury finds relief at danbury hospital
              danbury hospital neurosurgeon and care team helped new yorker maintain her quality of life after she broke her neck
              by amy, nonprofit

              summary:
              ⦁ katherine (kathy) wenning tripped and broke her neck when she was at her weekend home in washington, connecticut. Kathy and her husband, michael, knew she needed emergency care. They weren't sure where to go because they live in manhattan, and they've never needed urgent medical attention while staying in washington.
              ⦁ kathy and michael consulted with friends from new york who also spend time in connecticut and they recommended danbury hospital.
              ⦁ kathy had successful surgery to treat her severe spinal cord injury, followed by extensive occupational therapy and physical therapy.
              ⦁ today, kathy is fully functional and has been able to maintain her active lifestyle

              more....
              https://patch.com/connecticut/danbur...nbury-hospital

              i am wishing you all happy new year, and better news for the cure!

              Xxxooo

              Comment


                Originally posted by manouli View Post
                i am wishing you all happy new year, and better news for the cure!

                Xxxooo


                Designation From U.S. FDA
                01/08/2020 | 09:03am EST

                NEW HAVEN, Conn., Jan. 08, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ReNetX Bio announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company Fast Track Designation for ReNetX Bio?s clinical therapy (AXER-204) for the potential treatment of Chronic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). ReNetX Bio is currently conducting a Phase 1/2 clinical trial ?RESET? in patients with SCI, with topline results expected in 2021.
                SCI is a serious and currently incurable medical condition which causes profound deficits in function and impairs the ability to carry out activities of daily living (ADLs) and affects roughly 300,000 people in the United States. In addition to profound persistent neurological impairment, patients with chronic SCI suffer a variety of other health consequences including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis, and bone fractures.
                more..
                https://www.marketscreener.com/news/...FDA--29807818/

                Comment


                  Originally posted by manouli View Post
                  i am wishing you all happy new year, and better news for the cure!

                  Xxxooo

                  S. Biomedics to test embryonic stem cell-derived spinal cord injury treatment
                  ⦁ By Lee Han-soo
                  ⦁ Published 2019.11.29 15:42
                  ⦁ Updated 2019.11.29 17:49

                  Biomedics said that the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety has approved a clinical trial of its embryonic stem cell-derived spinal cord injury treatment. It is the first clinical trial of a locally developed embryonic stem cell-derived treatment.
                  The company plans to evaluate the safety and exploratory efficacy of the treatment in patients with ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS)-A and AIS-C within 60 days of nerve injury at Severance Hospital from the first half of 2020.
                  read...
                  http://www.koreabiomed.com/news/arti...tml?idxno=6916

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by manouli View Post
                    S. Biomedics to test embryonic stem cell-derived spinal cord injury treatment
                    ⦁ By Lee Han-soo
                    ⦁ Published 2019.11.29 15:42
                    ⦁ Updated 2019.11.29 17:49

                    Biomedics said that the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety has approved a clinical trial of its embryonic stem cell-derived spinal cord injury treatment. It is the first clinical trial of a locally developed embryonic stem cell-derived treatment.
                    The company plans to evaluate the safety and exploratory efficacy of the treatment in patients with ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS)-A and AIS-C within 60 days of nerve injury at Severance Hospital from the first half of 2020.
                    read...
                    http://www.koreabiomed.com/news/arti...tml?idxno=6916

                    New injection technique may boost spinal cord injury repair efforts
                    Date:
                    January 29, 2020
                    Source:
                    University of California - San Diego
                    Summary:
                    Researchers describe a new method for delivering neural precursor cells to spinal cord injuries in rats, reducing the risk of further injury and boosting the propagation of potentially reparative cells.

                    read...
                    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0129125606.htm

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by manouli View Post
                      New injection technique may boost spinal cord injury repair efforts
                      Date:
                      January 29, 2020
                      Source:
                      University of California - San Diego
                      Summary:
                      Researchers describe a new method for delivering neural precursor cells to spinal cord injuries in rats, reducing the risk of further injury and boosting the propagation of potentially reparative cells.

                      read...
                      https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0129125606.htm
                      Increasing the number of small blood vessels may be helpful for recovering movement
                      Download PDF Copy
                      Feb 6 2020
                      Many health conditions - ranging from disease of particular organs such as heart and lungs, widespread metabolic issues such as diabetes, or following trauma such as spinal cord injury ? cause difficulties with movement. This can severely affect quality of life and new research published today in The Journal of Physiology highlights the link between loss of the smallest blood vessels in muscle and difficulties moving and exercising. Understanding this link opens up the possibility of aiding recovery by growing more blood vessels in your muscles.
                      more...
                      https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...-movement.aspx

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by manouli View Post
                        Increasing the number of small blood vessels may be helpful for recovering movement
                        Download PDF Copy
                        Feb 6 2020
                        Many health conditions - ranging from disease of particular organs such as heart and lungs, widespread metabolic issues such as diabetes, or following trauma such as spinal cord injury ? cause difficulties with movement. This can severely affect quality of life and new research published today in The Journal of Physiology highlights the link between loss of the smallest blood vessels in muscle and difficulties moving and exercising. Understanding this link opens up the possibility of aiding recovery by growing more blood vessels in your muscles.
                        more...
                        https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...-movement.aspx


                        All Press Releases for February 14, 2020
                        Alexander G. Rabchevsky Presented with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award by Marquis Who's Who
                        Dr. Rabchevsky has been endorsed by Marquis Who's Who as a leader in the field of physiology
                        quote:

                        Through his work, Dr. Rabchevsky has become internationally known as a leading expert in autonomic pathophysiology following spinal cord injury. Since 1997, he has avidly investigated multiple therapeutic approaches towards treating experimental spinal cord injury and has received funding to aid in his independent research program. His current efforts are focused on alleviating both hindlimb locomotor and autonomic dysfunction following spinal cord injury in rats employing pharmacological treatments, as well as gene therapy to over-express certain growth factors near injury sites. The laboratory likewise conducts pioneering studies seeking to uniquely characterize bioenergetic damage to mitochondria after contusion spinal cord injury in order to target their dysfunction. As a result of Dr. Rabchevsky's many years of study, he has contributed over 60 articles to various scholarly journals, including the Journal of Neuroscience, Experimental Neurology, Journal of Neurotrauma and the Journal of Comparative Neurology.
                        read...
                        https://www.24-7pressrelease.com/pre...rquis-whos-who

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by manouli View Post
                          All Press Releases for February 14, 2020
                          Alexander G. Rabchevsky Presented with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award by Marquis Who's Who
                          Dr. Rabchevsky has been endorsed by Marquis Who's Who as a leader in the field of physiology
                          quote:

                          Through his work, Dr. Rabchevsky has become internationally known as a leading expert in autonomic pathophysiology following spinal cord injury. Since 1997, he has avidly investigated multiple therapeutic approaches towards treating experimental spinal cord injury and has received funding to aid in his independent research program. His current efforts are focused on alleviating both hindlimb locomotor and autonomic dysfunction following spinal cord injury in rats employing pharmacological treatments, as well as gene therapy to over-express certain growth factors near injury sites. The laboratory likewise conducts pioneering studies seeking to uniquely characterize bioenergetic damage to mitochondria after contusion spinal cord injury in order to target their dysfunction. As a result of Dr. Rabchevsky's many years of study, he has contributed over 60 articles to various scholarly journals, including the Journal of Neuroscience, Experimental Neurology, Journal of Neurotrauma and the Journal of Comparative Neurology.
                          read...
                          https://www.24-7pressrelease.com/pre...rquis-whos-who

                          Growth factor-modified stem cells help repair spinal cord injuries in rats
                          by admin | Feb 19, 2020 | Bernie Siegel?s WORLD STEM CELL SUMMIT BLOG, News and Opinions |

                          Durham, NC ? A new study released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine is the first to illustrate the presence of oxygen-deprived clusters throughout the damaged site of a compressed spinal cord. It is also the first to show how transplanting basic growth factor with the use of a viral vector to target the oxygen-deprived sites enhances the injured spinal cord?s recovery.
                          The study, conducted on a rat model that the study?s researchers developed just for their investigation, could eventually have great implications for cellular treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans.

                          more...
                          https://www.worldstemcellsummit.com/...uries-in-rats/

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by manouli View Post
                            Growth factor-modified stem cells help repair spinal cord injuries in rats
                            by admin | Feb 19, 2020 | Bernie Siegel?s WORLD STEM CELL SUMMIT BLOG, News and Opinions |

                            Durham, NC ? A new study released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine is the first to illustrate the presence of oxygen-deprived clusters throughout the damaged site of a compressed spinal cord. It is also the first to show how transplanting basic growth factor with the use of a viral vector to target the oxygen-deprived sites enhances the injured spinal cord?s recovery.
                            The study, conducted on a rat model that the study?s researchers developed just for their investigation, could eventually have great implications for cellular treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans.

                            more...
                            https://www.worldstemcellsummit.com/...uries-in-rats/


                            A protein critical for wound healing and neural repair following spinal cord injury identified

                            Plexin-B2, an axon guidance protein in the central nervous system (CNS), plays an important role in wound healing and neural repair following spinal cord injury (SCI), according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in Nature Neuroscience. The study?s findings could aid the development of therapies that target axon guidance pathways for more effective treatment of SCI patients.
                            read...
                            https://www.soundhealthandlastingwea...ry-identified/


                            Experimental research could regrow spinal cord neurons after injury
                            y: Ronnie Das
                            Posted: Mar 3, 2020 / 04:50 PM EST / Updated: Mar 3, 2020 / 04:55 PM EST
                            After injury (see damage at the center of the image), nerve fibers (in red) regrow past the injury (right) when energy levels in the tissue are increased Credit: Sheng lab, NINDS
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                            INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (WLNS) – Damaged nerve fibers that can be caused from a spinal cord injury could lead to permanent loss of function.

                            A lot of research has been done to find ways to regenerate nerve fibers, called axons, after an injury, but a recent study between the National Institutes of Health and the Indiana University School of Medicine may be the first step in restoring movement on previously injured axons.

                            Results of a study performed in mice and published in Cell Metabolism suggest that increasing energy supply within these injured spinal cord nerves could help promote axon regrowth.

                            more...
                            https://www.wlns.com/news/health/exp...-after-injury/
                            Last edited by manouli; 4 Mar 2020, 1:18 PM.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by manouli View Post
                              A protein critical for wound healing and neural repair following spinal cord injury identified

                              Plexin-B2, an axon guidance protein in the central nervous system (CNS), plays an important role in wound healing and neural repair following spinal cord injury (SCI), according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in Nature Neuroscience. The study?s findings could aid the development of therapies that target axon guidance pathways for more effective treatment of SCI patients.
                              read...
                              https://www.soundhealthandlastingwea...ry-identified/


                              Experimental research could regrow spinal cord neurons after injury
                              y: Ronnie Das
                              Posted: Mar 3, 2020 / 04:50 PM EST / Updated: Mar 3, 2020 / 04:55 PM EST
                              After injury (see damage at the center of the image), nerve fibers (in red) regrow past the injury (right) when energy levels in the tissue are increased Credit: Sheng lab, NINDS
                              AddThis Sharing Buttons
                              Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to WhatsAppShare to SMSShare to EmailShare to More
                              INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (WLNS) ? Damaged nerve fibers that can be caused from a spinal cord injury could lead to permanent loss of function.

                              A lot of research has been done to find ways to regenerate nerve fibers, called axons, after an injury, but a recent study between the National Institutes of Health and the Indiana University School of Medicine may be the first step in restoring movement on previously injured axons.

                              Results of a study performed in mice and published in Cell Metabolism suggest that increasing energy supply within these injured spinal cord nerves could help promote axon regrowth.

                              more...
                              https://www.wlns.com/news/health/exp...-after-injury/


                              Spinal cord injury patients can imagine resuming many activities because of new technologies

                              (Carl Wiens for The Washington Post)
                              By Karen Weintraub March 7
                              At age 16, German Aldana was riding in the back seat of a car driven by a friend when another car headed straight for them. To avoid a collision, his friend swerved and hit a concrete pole. The others weren?t seriously injured, but Aldana, unbuckled, was tossed around enough to snap his spine just below his neck. For the next five years, he could move only his neck, and his arms a little.
                              Right after he turned 21 and met the criteria, Aldana signed up for a research project at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine near his home.
                              Researchers with the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis carefully opened Aldana's skull and, at the surface of the brain, implanted electrodes. Then, in the lab, they trained a computer to interpret the pattern of signals from those electrodes as he imagines opening and closing his hand. The computer then transfers the signal to a prosthetic on Aldana's forearm, which then stimulates the appropriate muscles to cause his hand to close. The entire process takes 400 milliseconds from thought to grasp.
                              read...
                              https://www.washingtonpost.com/scien...a77_story.html

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by manouli View Post
                                Spinal cord injury patients can imagine resuming many activities because of new technologies

                                (Carl Wiens for The Washington Post)
                                By Karen Weintraub March 7
                                At age 16, German Aldana was riding in the back seat of a car driven by a friend when another car headed straight for them. To avoid a collision, his friend swerved and hit a concrete pole. The others weren?t seriously injured, but Aldana, unbuckled, was tossed around enough to snap his spine just below his neck. For the next five years, he could move only his neck, and his arms a little.
                                Right after he turned 21 and met the criteria, Aldana signed up for a research project at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine near his home.
                                Researchers with the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis carefully opened Aldana's skull and, at the surface of the brain, implanted electrodes. Then, in the lab, they trained a computer to interpret the pattern of signals from those electrodes as he imagines opening and closing his hand. The computer then transfers the signal to a prosthetic on Aldana's forearm, which then stimulates the appropriate muscles to cause his hand to close. The entire process takes 400 milliseconds from thought to grasp.
                                read...
                                https://www.washingtonpost.com/scien...a77_story.html

                                Potential for exciting new treatment for spinal cord injury10 March 2020
                                New research from the University of Aberdeen has found a new way to repair injured spinal nerves.

                                Researchers achieved significant regrowth of injured spinal nerves in rats when they activated a specific molecule found in nerve cells.
                                Dr Wenlong Huang, Dr Derryck Shewan and Dr Alba Guijarro-Belmar from the Institute of Medical Sciences found that activation of a molecule called Epac2 resulted in significant improvement in the regrowth of nerves that had been severed following spinal cord injury.
                                This is the first time that activation of Epac2 has been found to enhance nerve growth following spinal cord injury.
                                more...
                                https://www.abdn.ac.uk/news/13789/

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