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    Originally posted by manouli View Post
    VirTrial Awarded FDA-Approved Decentralized Clinical Trial with Hope Biosciences
    by VirTrial | Oct 9, 2019 | Press and News | 0 comments
    Scottsdale, AZ (October 9, 2019) ? VirTrial has been awarded an FDA-approved hybrid decentralized clinical trial (DCT) with Hope Biosciences. The study provides Hope Biosciences? autologous, adipose-derived culture-expanded mesenchymal stem cells (HB-adMSC?s) for the treatment of spinal cord injury/disorder (SCI/D). Study protocol incorporates remote visits via VirTrial?s telehealth platform.
    read....
    https://virtrial.com/virtrial-awarde...e-biosciences/




    $6.3 million DARPA grant boosts spinal repair research
    Grant funds University collaboration with Intel, R.I. Hospital, Micro Leads Medical to create spinal tech
    By Kathleen Meininger
    Contributing Writer
    Friday, October 11, 2019


    Summer Zhang / Herald
    A $6.3 million research grant from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency will allow University researchers to develop an implantable spinal device to help repair neural connections in the spine.
    The grant will fund a University collaboration with the Rhode Island Hospital, Intel Corporation and Micro Leads Medical.
    This new project falls at the intersection of neuroscience, computer science, engineering and clinical research. Researchers have created an implantable device that can record and stimulate areas both above and below a spinal injury in patients with spinal cord damage. Once the device records a signal traveling down the spinal cord from the brain, the signal is sent to a computer interface to be decoded by neural network algorithms, which are computer systems designed to recognize and transmit neural patterns. Then, the signal is used to stimulate the area of the spinal cord below the injury.
    more...
    http://www.browndailyherald.com/2019...pair-research/

    Comment


      Originally posted by manouli View Post
      $6.3 million DARPA grant boosts spinal repair research
      Grant funds University collaboration with Intel, R.I. Hospital, Micro Leads Medical to create spinal tech
      By Kathleen Meininger
      Contributing Writer
      Friday, October 11, 2019


      Summer Zhang / Herald
      A $6.3 million research grant from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency will allow University researchers to develop an implantable spinal device to help repair neural connections in the spine.
      The grant will fund a University collaboration with the Rhode Island Hospital, Intel Corporation and Micro Leads Medical.
      This new project falls at the intersection of neuroscience, computer science, engineering and clinical research. Researchers have created an implantable device that can record and stimulate areas both above and below a spinal injury in patients with spinal cord damage. Once the device records a signal traveling down the spinal cord from the brain, the signal is sent to a computer interface to be decoded by neural network algorithms, which are computer systems designed to recognize and transmit neural patterns. Then, the signal is used to stimulate the area of the spinal cord below the injury.
      more...
      http://www.browndailyherald.com/2019...pair-research/
      Salk scientists receive NIH funding to map brain circuitry for movement
      Download PDF Copy
      Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 18 2019
      A team of Salk scientists led by Professor Martyn Goulding has been awarded $14.3 million over five years by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to create a high-resolution atlas of how the mouse brain generates and controls skilled forelimb movements, such as reaching and grasping. Knowledge generated by the grant will provide a better understanding of not only how the brain controls movement, but also how it is affected by neurological diseases and spinal cord injuries that compromise arm, wrist and hand function.
      more...
      https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...-movement.aspx

      Comment


        Originally posted by manouli View Post
        Salk scientists receive NIH funding to map brain circuitry for movement
        Download PDF Copy
        Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 18 2019
        A team of Salk scientists led by Professor Martyn Goulding has been awarded $14.3 million over five years by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to create a high-resolution atlas of how the mouse brain generates and controls skilled forelimb movements, such as reaching and grasping. Knowledge generated by the grant will provide a better understanding of not only how the brain controls movement, but also how it is affected by neurological diseases and spinal cord injuries that compromise arm, wrist and hand function.
        more...
        https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...-movement.aspx


        just for the knowledge
        Spinal Cord Stimulation Devices Market by Product, Application and Geography - World Forecast to 2023
        Dublin, Oct. 21, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The "Global Spinal Cord Stimulation Devices Market (2019-2025)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

        The Global Spinal Cord Stimulation Devices Market size is expected to reach $2.8 billion by 2025, rising at a market growth of 8% CAGR during the forecast period.

        The increased cases of the failed back syndrome and complex regional pain syndrome are expected to positively impact the growth of the market. Failed back syndrome is a chronic pain that occurs after spinal surgeries for leg pain or back pain. Post the surgery, the pain reduces or the condition worsens due to scar tissue that arises around the spinal nerve roots.

        Spinal cord stimulation devices treat patients who previously failed to get positive results from spinal surgeries. The devices block the pain before it reaches the brain. Therefore, the increased rate of patients suffering from chronic pain after surgeries is expected to boost the demand for these devices over the forecast period. Additionally, technological developments are pushing the growth and developments in the market. For example, Medtronic's Intellis is the smallest implantable spinal cord stimulator that was created to overcome limitations with the existing systems.
        read...
        http://markets.financialcontent.com/...?GUID=39009371

        Comment


          Originally posted by manouli View Post
          just for the knowledge
          Spinal Cord Stimulation Devices Market by Product, Application and Geography - World Forecast to 2023
          Dublin, Oct. 21, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The "Global Spinal Cord Stimulation Devices Market (2019-2025)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

          The Global Spinal Cord Stimulation Devices Market size is expected to reach $2.8 billion by 2025, rising at a market growth of 8% CAGR during the forecast period.

          The increased cases of the failed back syndrome and complex regional pain syndrome are expected to positively impact the growth of the market. Failed back syndrome is a chronic pain that occurs after spinal surgeries for leg pain or back pain. Post the surgery, the pain reduces or the condition worsens due to scar tissue that arises around the spinal nerve roots.

          Spinal cord stimulation devices treat patients who previously failed to get positive results from spinal surgeries. The devices block the pain before it reaches the brain. Therefore, the increased rate of patients suffering from chronic pain after surgeries is expected to boost the demand for these devices over the forecast period. Additionally, technological developments are pushing the growth and developments in the market. For example, Medtronic's Intellis is the smallest implantable spinal cord stimulator that was created to overcome limitations with the existing systems.
          read...
          http://markets.financialcontent.com/...?GUID=39009371

          Polymerized estrogen can protect nervous system cells and promote regeneration
          Download PDF Copy
          Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 23 2019
          Spinal cord damage that causes paralysis and reduced mobility doesn't always stop with the initial trauma, but there are few treatment options to halt increased deterioration -- and there is no cure. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a promising new biomaterial that could offer targeted treatment to the damaged spinal cord and tissue, preventing further damage.
          In research published today in Nature Communications, an interdisciplinary team from Rensselaer demonstrated how estrogen -- a natural hormone produced in the body -- can be polymerized into a slow-releasing biomaterial and applied to nervous system cells to protect those cells and even promote regeneration.
          read...
          https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...eneration.aspx

          Comment


            Polymerized estrogen can protect nervous system cells and promote regeneration
            Download PDF Copy
            Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 23 2019
            Spinal cord damage that causes paralysis and reduced mobility doesn't always stop with the initial trauma, but there are few treatment options to halt increased deterioration -- and there is no cure. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a promising new biomaterial that could offer targeted treatment to the damaged spinal cord and tissue, preventing further damage.
            In research published today in Nature Communications, an interdisciplinary team from Rensselaer demonstrated how estrogen -- a natural hormone produced in the body -- can be polymerized into a slow-releasing biomaterial and applied to nervous system cells to protect those cells and even promote regeneration.
            read...
            https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...eneration.aspx

            Comment


              Originally posted by manouli View Post
              Polymerized estrogen can protect nervous system cells and promote regeneration
              Download PDF Copy
              Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 23 2019
              Spinal cord damage that causes paralysis and reduced mobility doesn't always stop with the initial trauma, but there are few treatment options to halt increased deterioration -- and there is no cure. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a promising new biomaterial that could offer targeted treatment to the damaged spinal cord and tissue, preventing further damage.
              In research published today in Nature Communications, an interdisciplinary team from Rensselaer demonstrated how estrogen -- a natural hormone produced in the body -- can be polymerized into a slow-releasing biomaterial and applied to nervous system cells to protect those cells and even promote regeneration.
              read...
              https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...eneration.aspx

              A protein that pulls the brake on nerve growth
              Date:
              October 31, 2019
              Source:
              DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases
              Summary:
              During embryonic development, nerve cells form thin, long extensions, which they use to wire up a complex network, the brain. Scientists have now identified a protein that regulates the growth of these extensions by pulling a brake. In the long run, their findings could help to develop new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injuries.
              read...
              https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1031114746.htm

              Comment


                2,051 viewsOct 29, 2019, 08:47pm A New HBO Documentary, Starring Mountain Biker Paul Basagoitia, Brings Awareness To Spinal Cord Injuries /sites/sarahkim//sites/sarahkim/Sarah Kim Contributor Diversity & Inclusion I write about diversity and inclusion in the realm of disabilities.


                At any time in life, someone can become a part of the disability community. Disability is the only minority group that doesn’t discriminate against anyone since it can become a part of a person’s identity spontaneously. Mountain biker Paul Basagoitia experienced this phenomenon first-hand back in 2015 when he crashed his bike after a 40-foot drop at the Red Bull Rampage and sustained a spinal cord injury, fracturing his 12th vertebrae. The injury left him paralyzed from the waist down.
                read...
                https://www.forbes.com/sites/sarahki.../#3c410d9b27e1

                Comment


                  Originally posted by manouli View Post
                  2,051 viewsOct 29, 2019, 08:47pm A New HBO Documentary, Starring Mountain Biker Paul Basagoitia, Brings Awareness To Spinal Cord Injuries /sites/sarahkim//sites/sarahkim/Sarah Kim Contributor Diversity & Inclusion I write about diversity and inclusion in the realm of disabilities.


                  At any time in life, someone can become a part of the disability community. Disability is the only minority group that doesn?t discriminate against anyone since it can become a part of a person?s identity spontaneously. Mountain biker Paul Basagoitia experienced this phenomenon first-hand back in 2015 when he crashed his bike after a 40-foot drop at the Red Bull Rampage and sustained a spinal cord injury, fracturing his 12th vertebrae. The injury left him paralyzed from the waist down.
                  read...
                  https://www.forbes.com/sites/sarahki.../#3c410d9b27e1



                  Researchers from the US have developed a biosensor that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer?s and Parkinson?s diseases and other neurological disorders.
                  The device, created by a team from Rutgers University in New Jersey, features a unique graphene and gold-based platform and high-tech imaging and monitors the fate of stem cells by detecting genetic material (RNA) involved in turning such cells into brain cells (neurons).
                  Stem cells can become many different types of cells. As a result, stem cell therapy shows promise for regenerative treatment of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer?s, Parkinson?s, stroke and spinal cord injury, with diseased cells needing replacement or repair.
                  read...
                  https://eandt.theiet.org/content/art...-cell-therapy/

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by manouli View Post
                    Researchers from the US have developed a biosensor that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer?s and Parkinson?s diseases and other neurological disorders.
                    The device, created by a team from Rutgers University in New Jersey, features a unique graphene and gold-based platform and high-tech imaging and monitors the fate of stem cells by detecting genetic material (RNA) involved in turning such cells into brain cells (neurons).
                    Stem cells can become many different types of cells. As a result, stem cell therapy shows promise for regenerative treatment of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer?s, Parkinson?s, stroke and spinal cord injury, with diseased cells needing replacement or repair.
                    read...
                    https://eandt.theiet.org/content/art...-cell-therapy/


                    Woman Suffers Severe Spinal Cord Injury, Finds Relief at Danbury Hospital
                    Western Connecticut Health Network October 23, 2019



                    ⦁ Katherine (Kathy) Wenning tripped and broke her neck when she was at her weekend home in Washington, Connecticut. Kathy and her husband, Michael Dennis, knew she needed emergency care. They weren?t sure where to go because they live in Manhattan, and they?ve never needed urgent medical attention while staying in Washington.
                    ⦁ Kathy and Michael consulted with friends from New York who also spend time in Connecticut and they recommended Danbury Hospital.
                    ⦁ Kathy had successful surgery to treat her severe spinal cord injury, followed by extensive occupational therapy and physical therapy.
                    ⦁ Today, Kathy is fully functional and has been able to maintain her active lifestyle.
                    DANBURY, Connecticut, October 23, 2019 ? A freak accident left Katherine (Kathy) Wenning unable to move her upper body. She knew she needed medical attention, but she was at her country getaway in Washington, Connecticut ? two hours by car from her home in Manhattan and the New York medical system she trusted. Kathy put her faith in a neurosurgeon and care team at Danbury Hospital to treat her severe spinal cord injury.

                    more...
                    https://www.westernconnecticuthealth...-patient-story

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by manouli View Post
                      Woman Suffers Severe Spinal Cord Injury, Finds Relief at Danbury Hospital
                      Western Connecticut Health Network October 23, 2019



                      ⦁ Katherine (Kathy) Wenning tripped and broke her neck when she was at her weekend home in Washington, Connecticut. Kathy and her husband, Michael Dennis, knew she needed emergency care. They weren?t sure where to go because they live in Manhattan, and they?ve never needed urgent medical attention while staying in Washington.
                      ⦁ Kathy and Michael consulted with friends from New York who also spend time in Connecticut and they recommended Danbury Hospital.
                      ⦁ Kathy had successful surgery to treat her severe spinal cord injury, followed by extensive occupational therapy and physical therapy.
                      ⦁ Today, Kathy is fully functional and has been able to maintain her active lifestyle.
                      DANBURY, Connecticut, October 23, 2019 ? A freak accident left Katherine (Kathy) Wenning unable to move her upper body. She knew she needed medical attention, but she was at her country getaway in Washington, Connecticut ? two hours by car from her home in Manhattan and the New York medical system she trusted. Kathy put her faith in a neurosurgeon and care team at Danbury Hospital to treat her severe spinal cord injury.

                      more...
                      https://www.westernconnecticuthealth...-patient-story


                      BioArctic's interim analysis of phase 1/2 study of SC0806 in patients with CSC injury halts spinal cord injury project
                      BioArctic AB (STO: BIOAB), a Swedish research-based biopharmaceutical company, reported on Monday the results of an interim analysis of a phase 1/2 study of SC0806 in patients with complete spinal cord injury.
                      Under this analysis, none of the patients showed an effect as measured by electrical impulses passing through the injured area after treatment. Electrical impulse passage is considered a prerequisite to restore motor function. This means that the study did not meet the primary efficacy endpoint. Also, the results did not show convincing efficacy on secondary endpoints regarding motor function, other functions or quality of life.
                      Based on these results BioArctic has decided to stop the inclusion of patients in the ongoing phase 1/2 study. The company has also decided not to further develop the complete spinal cord injury project after the final patient has completed the training programme.
                      more...
                      https://www.m2.com/m2/web/story.php/20199359700

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by manouli View Post
                        BioArctic's interim analysis of phase 1/2 study of SC0806 in patients with CSC injury halts spinal cord injury project
                        BioArctic AB (STO: BIOAB), a Swedish research-based biopharmaceutical company, reported on Monday the results of an interim analysis of a phase 1/2 study of SC0806 in patients with complete spinal cord injury.
                        Under this analysis, none of the patients showed an effect as measured by electrical impulses passing through the injured area after treatment. Electrical impulse passage is considered a prerequisite to restore motor function. This means that the study did not meet the primary efficacy endpoint. Also, the results did not show convincing efficacy on secondary endpoints regarding motor function, other functions or quality of life.
                        Based on these results BioArctic has decided to stop the inclusion of patients in the ongoing phase 1/2 study. The company has also decided not to further develop the complete spinal cord injury project after the final patient has completed the training programme.
                        more...
                        https://www.m2.com/m2/web/story.php/20199359700
                        Experimental Treatment Yields Amazing Results For Mayo Patient


                        Rochester, MN (KROC-AM News) - The Mayo Clinic cautions the human trial is still in a very early stage, but the first patient to receive a new stem cell therapy for paralysis has experienced an amazing recovery.
                        53-year-old Chris Barr suffered a catastrophic spinal cord injury in a surfing accident in 2017, and after intensive rehabilitation, faced a lifetime with limited movement and feeling below his neck. That apparently made him the perfect candidate for a Mayo Clinic study led by Dr. Mohamad Bydon, who enrolled Barr in a phase 1 clinical trial to determine if the experimental therapy is safe. It involves removing stem cells from fat tissue in the patient?s body and expanding their number into a mega-dose that is then injected into the injured spinal cord.
                        "We want to intervene when the physical function has plateaued, so that we do not allow the intervention to take credit for early improvements that occur as part of the natural history with many spinal cord injuries. In this case, the patient was injected with stem cells nearly one year after his injury," Dr. Bydon says.

                        more..
                        https://krocnews.com/experimental-tr...-mayo-patient/

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by manouli View Post
                          Experimental Treatment Yields Amazing Results For Mayo Patient


                          Rochester, MN (KROC-AM News) - The Mayo Clinic cautions the human trial is still in a very early stage, but the first patient to receive a new stem cell therapy for paralysis has experienced an amazing recovery.
                          53-year-old Chris Barr suffered a catastrophic spinal cord injury in a surfing accident in 2017, and after intensive rehabilitation, faced a lifetime with limited movement and feeling below his neck. That apparently made him the perfect candidate for a Mayo Clinic study led by Dr. Mohamad Bydon, who enrolled Barr in a phase 1 clinical trial to determine if the experimental therapy is safe. It involves removing stem cells from fat tissue in the patient?s body and expanding their number into a mega-dose that is then injected into the injured spinal cord.
                          "We want to intervene when the physical function has plateaued, so that we do not allow the intervention to take credit for early improvements that occur as part of the natural history with many spinal cord injuries. In this case, the patient was injected with stem cells nearly one year after his injury," Dr. Bydon says.

                          more..
                          https://krocnews.com/experimental-tr...-mayo-patient/



                          November 27, 2019
                          Mayo Clinic research is a step toward hope for spinal cord injuries
                          By Susan Buckles

                          I want to try this! I might get something back to be helpful to my everyday life.

                          Early research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings examines the first case at Mayo Clinic of stem cell therapy tested in humans for spinal cord injury. The case study found stem cell intervention, which took place after standard surgery, and physical and occupational therapy, restored some function in a patient with spinal cord injury. The report, "Celltop Clinical Trial: First Report From a Phase I Trial of Autologous Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Paralysis Due to Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury" is published in the Nov. 27, 2019 edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
                          The research discusses the experience related to the first case in a phase I safety study of mesenchymal stem cell treatment for spinal cord injury. Mohamad Bydon, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurologic surgeon and the lead author, cautions that each patient is different, so it's too early to consider stem cell therapies as a treatment or cure for paralysis from spinal cord injury. Dr. Bydon adds that much like early trials in general, the stem cell trials are going to show variable response rates.
                          more...
                          https://regenerativemedicineblog.may...cord-injuries/

                          Comment


                            To state that someone has plateaued after a year is, in my opinion, stretching it. I continued to experience recovery many years out. It seems likely to me that they might not have waited long enough? But this is certainly worth watching. And he was borderline acute/chronic. Also, he definitely was incomplete (for whatever that's worth anymore) experiencing some recovery early on.
                            Last edited by GreaseLightning; 3 Dec 2019, 10:46 PM.

                            Comment


                              Exactly!!! Their inclusion criteria is Asia A or Asia B. Yet they admit this guy was Asia C and he was already walking.

                              I'm not saying the stem cells did not help.
                              But who knows really? There is no way he plateaued at one year as an Asia C.

                              I did not start walking decently with a walker until 1 year. With extensive exercise someone with that much return can improve indefinitely...

                              All that said if they offered the stem cells to me I would take them in a minute
                              Last edited by Mitchitsu; 3 Dec 2019, 4:29 PM.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Mitchitsu View Post
                                Exactly!!! Their inclusion criteria is Asia A or Asia B. Yet they admit this guy was Asia C and he was already walking.

                                I'm not saying the stem cells did not help.
                                But who knows really? There is no way he plateaued at one year as an Asia C.

                                I did not start walking decently with a walker until 1 year. With extensive exercise someone with that much return can improve indefinitely...

                                All that said if they offered the stem cells to me I would take them in a minute



                                Transforming thoughts to movement offers new hope for spinal cord injury patients
                                A paralyzed research participant, who was implanted with a brain-machine interface, is using his thoughts to initiate steps while on a robotic walking simulator. Photo: The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis
                                By Scott Roy
                                11-04-2019

                                /"/"/"/"https://www.addtoany.com/share
                                A team of researchers at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis and the Miller School of Medicine is using a brain-machine interface to help restore function in paralysis patients after spinal cord injury.
                                What if paralyzed limbs could move using only the power of one?s thoughts? Borrowing a story line from the realm of science fiction, a team of researchers at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis ? together with neurosurgeons and biomedical engineers from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine ? are using a brain-machine interface to make this once seemingly impossible feat a reality for people who are living with spinal cord injury (SCI).
                                read..
                                https://news.miami.edu/stories/2019/...-patients.html

                                Comment

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