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Spinal Cord Injury Articles Posted by Manouli

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    #16
    Originally posted by NW-Will View Post
    I have to say though I miss seeing the article headline as a new subject line each time you post a fresh article. Some of the article titles really draw me in. Just saying... Keep up the awesome work.
    agreed...

    this will get chaotic

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by NW-Will View Post
      I have to say though I miss seeing the article headline as a new subject line each time you post a fresh article. Some of the article titles really draw me in. Just saying... Keep up the awesome work.
      Hi, I want to make you happy guys, and do what is the best way. Thanks all of you for your kind words. When the cure is here we are all going to get together with Dr. Young and have a big happy party. Also we are going to dance the tango because we will be able to do so.

      manouli.

      Comment


        #18
        StemCells, Inc. Initiates World��s First Neural Stem Cell Trial In Spinal Cord Injury

        this must be new one. if ir is not forgive me.

        quote:

        The proposed study will be conducted at the Balgrist University Hospital, in Zurich, which is a private, non-profit institution managed in accordance with economic principles



        StemCells, Inc. Initiates World��s First Neural Stem Cell Trial In Spinal Cord Injury





        StemCells Inc Press Release

        StemCells Inc announced today they are initiating a clinical trial using their fetal derived neural progenitor cells for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. Previously the company had reported that their stem cells, called HuCNS-SC, are capable of differentiating into various neural lineage cells including neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. The fact that HuCNS-SC are derived from fetal sources allows them to possess a lower ability to stimulate immune responses, therefore, the cells can be used as an ��off the shelf�� product.
        According to the company ��The Company��s preclinical research has shown that HuCNS-SC cells can be directly transplanted in the central nervous system (CNS) with no sign of tumor formation or adverse effects. Because the transplanted HuCNS-SC cells have been shown to engraft and survive long-term, this suggests the possibility of a durable clinical effect following a single transplantation. StemCells believes that HuCNS-SC cells may have broad therapeutic application for many diseases and disorders of the CNS, and to date has demonstrated human safety data from completed and ongoing studies of these cells in two fatal brain disorders in children.��
        The proposed study will be conducted at the Balgrist University Hospital, in Zurich, which is a private, non-profit institution managed in accordance with economic principles. The clinic has three key areas of expertise: it is a highly specialised centre providing examination, treatment and rehabilitation opportunities to patients with serious musculoskeletal conditions; it is responsible for training future doctors studying at the University of Zurich in orthopaedics and paraplegiology and providing professional training for doctors and medical staff in the domains of orthopaedics, paraplegiology, rheumatology, anaesthesiology and radiology; it is a research centre dedicated to improving quality for healthcare in the future. The number of patients or inclusion/exclusion criteria for the trial was not mentioned in the press release. However a look at clinicaltrials.gov reveals the following:
        The study is a 12 patient Phase I/II trial in which treated patients will also receive immune suppression so that the transplanted cells will not be rejected. The trial has the following inclusion/exclusion criteria:
        Inclusion Criteria:



        read....

        http://www.unistemcells.com/en/news/...1492915952.htm

        Comment


          #19
          Local researchers to partner in 'sensorimotor' project

          Local researchers to partner in 'sensorimotor' project
          Posted: Jul 14, 2011 1:58 PM PDT Updated: Jul 14, 2011 1:58 PM PDT


          SAN DIEGO (CNS) - San Diego State University, Southwestern College in Chula Vista and the San Diego-based life science industry group BIOCOM will be partners in researching the brain's control of body movements, the National Science Foundation announced Thursday.

          The goal of the $18.5 million study will be to translate the findings into improved prosthetics for amputees, sensor-electrode systems that reanimate paralyzed limbs and home-based rehabilitation for spinal cord injuries.

          The project could benefit wounded soldiers, accident victims with spinal cord injuries and those who suffer from cerebral palsy, stroke, Parkinson's disease or age-related neurological disorders.

          "Our ultimate goal is that we want to remotely control a robotic device through neural function, not joysticks," SDSU mechanical engineering Professor Kee Moon said.

          read...

          http://www.cbs8.com/story/15083863/l...imotor-project


          NSF Funds $18.5 Million Effort to Create Mind-Machine Interface
          Released: 7/14/2011 9:00 AM EDT
          Source: University of Washington

          Newswise — The National Science Foundation today announced an $18.5 million grant to establish an Engineering Research Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering based at the University of Washington.

          “The center will work on robotic devices that interact with, assist and understand the nervous system,” said director Yoky Matsuoka, a UW associate professor of computer science and engineering. “It will combine advances in robotics, neuroscience, electromechanical devices and computer science to restore or augment the body’s ability for sensation and movement.”

          The center launches this month and will be based in Russell Hall on the UW’s Seattle campus. The grant is for five years of funding, with the possibility of renewal for another five years.

          Partners are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and San Diego State University. Also partnering are historically minority-serving institutions Spelman College and Morehouse College, both in Atlanta, and Southwestern College in Chula Vista, Calif. International partners are the University of British Columbia and the University of Tokyo.

          continue....

          http://www.newswise.com/articles/nsf...hine-interface
          Last edited by manouli; 15 Jul 2011, 7:17 AM.

          Comment


            #20
            Spinal Cord Injury Research

            Spinal Cord Injury Research


            Helping Patients to Walk Again: Nerve Regeneration



            quote:

            "I am optimistic that we will be conducting human clinical trials within ten years," says Dr. Windebank. "This project is so exciting that I can't wait to get into the lab."

            lolol if you cannot wait, why you have to wait 10 years to start?


            Anyway, a lot of good information here....

            please check this out...

            http://discoverysedge.mayo.edu/spina...jury/index.cfm

            Comment


              #21
              New program for spinal injuries aims to expand care now, find cure in future

              New program for spinal injuries aims to expand care now, find cure in future
              By Mitzi Baker


              Graham Creasey (left) and Gary Steinberg (right) have started a spinal cord injury and repair program helping patients, like army veteran Sonia Alvarado, reclaim some abilities.
              What could be harder than not being able to walk? Lots of other hardships can be as challenging, said Graham Creasey, MD. Not being able to lift a spoon to your mouth can be difficult, and there are others harder still.

              Creasey wants to change that now that he's the medical director of a new program starting at the School of Medicine designed to improve the lives of those with spinal cord injuries.

              "If you have broken your neck, most people assume that the most important priority is to walk again," said Creasey, acting professor of neurosurgery. Since he's worked with people paralyzed from spinal cord injuries, he's learned that other things can take precedence over walking: being able to cough to clear your lungs, being able to control when you have to use the bathroom and just being able to use your hands.

              "If you can't use your legs, you can still get around in a wheelchair, but if you can't use your hands, it's hard to use anything," said Creasey.

              The Spinal Cord Injury and Repair Program was the brainchild of Gary Steinberg, MD, PhD, the Bernard and Ronnie Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor of Neurosurgery and the Neurosciences, who received approval for the program last summer. For the last decade or so, he has been interested in ways to restore the nervous system following injury, particularly after stroke. "But the spinal cord might be the first place we can achieve this goal in patients, since it is so much simpler than the brain," he said.

              Steinberg wants the program to do something never done before: restore function to the spinal nerves following paralysis. "The ultimate goal is to achieve as close to a normal lifestyle as possible for people," he said.

              Until that dream is realized, Creasey implements the many options that can improve the lives of paralyzed people. In particular, he advocates for the use of electrical stimulation devices that can provide the missing signals from damaged nerves to muscles. Creasey has pioneered the use of such devices, which he called "neural prostheses."

              read...

              http://neurosurgery.stanford.edu/about/090508.html

              Comment


                #22
                Manouli,

                thank's for your fantastic articles!

                Günther, Hamburg

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by NW-Will View Post
                  I have to say though I miss seeing the article headline as a new subject line each time you post a fresh article. Some of the article titles really draw me in. Just saying... Keep up the awesome work.
                  I too, think this is not a positive change.
                  Daniel

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Paralysis: New hope from studying rats

                    posted 14 July 2011

                    It’s an old, grim axiom of neuroscience: After an injury, the nerves in your hand, arm or leg may grow back, but neurons in the brain and the spinal cord will not.

                    Part of the reason is a molecule called proteoglycan — a biological insulation that separates tissues. During development, for example, proteoglycan prevents the placenta from growing deep into the developing fetus. “The proteoglycan molecule has been known as nature’s own barrier molecule,” says Jerry Silver, a professor of neuroscience at Case Western Reserve University.

                    Proteoglycan strongly inhibits the growth and movement of cells, and explains why cartilage has neither nerves nor a blood supply.

                    In the spinal cord, proteoglycan serves to lock the nerves into position, preventing unwanted growth. Unfortunately, when the spinal cord is injured, a new burst of proteoglycan “walls off the injury site, but also blocks nerve regeneration,” says Silver.

                    A bacterial balm?
                    Now, using an enzyme made by a deadly bacterium, Silver and his colleagues have learned to restore normal breathing in rats with a damaged spinal cord. The study, published in Nature yesterday, shows that a combination of grafting and a proteoglycan-eating enzyme called chondroitinase may sidestep the proteoglycan’s growth-deadening effect – and open a path to the holy Grail of partial repair to the spinal cord.

                    As scientists continue trying to rebuild the spinal cord with stem cells, the new study shows an alternative route to healing.


                    read....

                    http://whyfiles.org/2011/spinal-cord-injury/

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Deadlines for DOD Spinal Cord Injury Research Program (SCIRP) pre-proposals July 15

                      Posted on: Thursday, June 16, 2011
                      The Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11) Defense Appropriations Act provides $12M to the Department of Defense (DOD) Spinal Cord Injury Research Program (SCIRP).

                      The SCIRP focuses its funding on innovative projects that have the potential to significantly impact improvements in the function, wellness, and overall quality of life for spinal cord injured military service members and veterans, their caregivers, families, and the American public.

                      read....

                      http://research.wayne.edu/rwnews/article.php?id=910

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by dan_nc View Post
                        I too, think this is not a positive change.
                        I agree, each article posted should have its own thread for comments/discussion IMO
                        In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by dan_nc View Post
                          I too, think this is not a positive change.
                          Originally posted by paolocipolla View Post
                          I agree, each article posted should have its own thread for comments/discussion IMO
                          Agree
                          Don't ask what clinical trials can do for you, ask what you can do for clinical trials.

                          Fenexy: Proyecto Volver a Caminar

                          http://www.fenexy.org (soon in english too)

                          Comment


                            #28
                            manouli Way to go

                            Comment


                              #29
                              State’s First Comprehensive Care, One-Stop Center for Spinal Cord Injury Patients Ope

                              State’s First Comprehensive Care, One-Stop Center for Spinal Cord Injury Patients Opens


                              Roper Rehab, MUSC Health, Carolinas Rehab, SCIRF combine efforts to offer specialized care

                              Charleston, S.C., July 15, 2011 –RoperRehabilitationHospital, MUSC Health, Carolinas Rehabilitation and the Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund (SCIRF) have developed a new, collaborative program that will improve patient care for hundreds of people in our area living with spinal cord injury.



                              The Center for Spinal Cord Injury (CSCI) officially opened today in the 6th floor rehabilitation gym atRoperHospital, where physicians, hospital administrators and local officials were among those who gathered to learn about the new treatment center. The CSCI will offer specialized services unique to spinal cord injury patients in one location and during a single appointment. It is the first medical program of its kind inSouth Carolina.

                              read...

                              http://charleston.thedigitel.com/hea...r-s-32635-0715

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Sorry but I think this Manouli sticky it´s a bit messy. Not that Manouli´s work is wrong.

                                Comment

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