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Dr Wise Young speaks about Spinal Injury & Cord Blood

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  • #46
    Wow! What's the population of Hong Kong? - you'd think there'd be enough patients for your trial

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    • #47
      population of hongkong is roughly 7 million

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      • #48
        Wise as i have L1 compression injury but can walk like normal person but loss of bladder bowel and sexual function. Is this injury with spasticity or flaccidity? If not flaccidity then can u keep me in ur phase3 trials?
        In Brazil trial L1 patient have recovered bladder bowel function and also moments in legs with mesenchymal cells combined with some hormones and proteins. What u will say about that dear? How that patient got so much recovery and functions?

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        • #49
          This is awesome stuff Dr Young - seriously awesome news.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by lunasicc42 View Post
            comad. Where does anything say anything about toe wiggling? I missed it and want to read. Do you mean geron or wise?
            no...not yet. I didn't see this toe thing in any report...just expression ...we hope ans we know it will come.
            www.MiracleofWalk.com

            Miracles are not contrary to nature, but only contrary
            to what we know about nature
            Saint Augustine

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
              Flaccid is opposite of spastic. The lumbosacral spinal cord is located at T11-L1. It contains the neurons (gray matter) that innervate the muscles of the leg. Damage to the lumbosacral cord results in loss of gray matter including the neurons responsible for innervating muscle and the circuitry for reflexes and programmed movements. When you have flaccid paralysis, you don't have spasticity.

              I believe that restoring function to lumbosacral injuries will require neuronal replacement. Neural stem cells can make neurons and some animal studies suggest that they can also replace motoneurons. There are several sources of immune-compatible neural stem cells. One is induced pluripotent stem (iPS) which can be differentiated to neural stem cells. The other is autologous call pluripotent adult stem cells which can be differentiated into neural stem cells, including the MUSE cells described by Mari Dezawa.

              Please note, however, that much research still needs to be done to find out the best kind of cells to transplant to replace motoneurons, to get these cells to send axons out of the spinal cord to innervate muscle, to regenerate sensory and descending axons to connect with these neurons to reform reflex circuits, and to program the spinal cord for micturition (urination), bowel movements, walking, and other programmed motor function.

              People who have injuries to L2 or lower segments will have primarily spinal root (cauda equina) injuries. These roots need to be regenerated. Axons must be coaxed to grow into the spinal cord. Motor axons must be grown from the spinal cord into the muscle. If the injury is close to the spinal cord, motoneuronal replacement may be necessary.

              Finally, flaccidity (complete loss of muscle tone) usually results in marked atrophy of muscles. For a long time, clinicians thought that denervated muscles could not be restored. However, a group in Vienna has reported that very intense electrical stimulation of muscle can not only maintain but restore denervated muscles.

              I know that the reversal of flaccid paralysis sounds daunting but I think that we will be surprised by how flexible the spinal cord is.

              Wise.
              Dr. Young,
              Your explanation of flaccid paralysis and the therapies needed to overcome a lower thoracic/ lumbar break is interesting. As I have mentioned to you before, I broke my back at the T-11 vertebrae and doctors say I have a conus injury. I too have flaccid paralysis and a lower motor neuron lesion. You mentioned that studies in Vienna have showed that prolonged electrical stimulation can reverse the denervation of the muscle? Electrical stimulus does not work on my legs because the reflex arch is not present due to my injury level. E-stim does not contract my muscles and can not with a lower motor neuron lesion. How can electrical stimulation reverse the denervation of the muscle?
              Thanks,
              Brent

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              • #52
                @Brent A - check this out:

                /forum/showthread.php?t=153632

                I just got the unit this week.

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                • #53
                  Fly Pelican,
                  THANK YOU SO MUCH!! This is exactly what I am needing. I am not good at converting the euro to $$ how much does the unit cost. With electrodes and shipping and all. I would be VERY interested in purchasing this unit!
                  Thanks,
                  Brent

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Brent A View Post
                    Fly Pelican,
                    THANK YOU SO MUCH!! This is exactly what I am needing. I am not good at converting the euro to $$ how much does the unit cost. With electrodes and shipping and all. I would be VERY interested in purchasing this unit!
                    Thanks,
                    Brent
                    £4000 = $6,383.20 This is the cost of the unit from the distributor in the UK. There isnt currently a distributor in the US I understand.

                    There are a number of CC members from the US who are looking into getting the unit. I would suggest you have a chat to them before buying it.

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                    • #55
                      Wise, in the animal experiments the cord blood cells must be turning into glial cells for the axons to grow across, is that right? - as well as producing the nerve growth factors you mentioned.

                      Or is the thinking that there are enough glial cells surviving for say 10% axons and just nerve growth factors are needed?

                      Obviously I don't understand these things but I thought in mid thoracic injuries it is a lack of glial pathways that is main problem.

                      Neck and lumbar injuries need nerve cell replacement too.
                      Last edited by Christopher Paddon; 06-30-2011, 11:09 PM.

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                      • #56
                        Promising!..i would like to know the result of the trial

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                        • #57
                          "Please note, however, that much research still needs to be done to find out the best kind of cells to transplant to replace motoneurons, to get these cells to send axons out of the spinal cord to innervate muscle, to regenerate sensory and descending axons to connect with these neurons to reform reflex circuits, and to program the spinal cord for micturition (urination), bowel movements, walking, and other programmed motor function."

                          Dr.Wise, name, please, the lab(s), conducting these needed researches.

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                          • #58
                            "In the coming years, IPS and induced neural stem cells (INS) cells will become available for spinal cord injury clinical trials. These are the cells that will be useful for replacing neurons and for treating lumbosacral spinal cord injury where neuronal replacements will be necessary for functional recovery. Much research is going on to develop ways to ensure the safety of such cells.
                            In the meantime, other clinical trials are beginning to assess therapies to regenerate long axonal tracts in the spinal cord. Geron is taking the first embryonic stem cell derived oligodendroglial precursor cells to clinical trial in subacute spinal cord injury. ChinaSCINet is beginning the first transplantations of umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and lithium treatment of spinal cord injury. Bone marrow stem cells are already being tested. Combination therapies are being considered for clinical trial." (/forum/showthread.php?t=19111&page=11 post#108)


                            Dr.Wise, may I ask you to add some specifics to what you say? I suggest a such scheme : name of the lab - kind of research - what is accomplished - what is remain - when you plan its examination in your trials - to what term it's realistic getting it to practical appliance. Just don't be unfounded, share with us the info allowing to you being such incurable optimist.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by kivi66 View Post
                              "Please note, however, that much research still needs to be done to find out the best kind of cells to transplant to replace motoneurons, to get these cells to send axons out of the spinal cord to innervate muscle, to regenerate sensory and descending axons to connect with these neurons to reform reflex circuits, and to program the spinal cord for micturition (urination), bowel movements, walking, and other programmed motor function."

                              Dr.Wise, name, please, the lab(s), conducting these needed researches.
                              He didn't say the research was being conducted, just that it needed to be done. There's no way he can know every lab around the world doing research on nerves.
                              T5/6, ASIA A, injured 30 Nov 08
                              Future SCI Alumnus.
                              I don't want to dance in the rain, I want to soar above the storm.

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by mcferguson View Post
                                He didn't say the research was being conducted, just that it needed to be done. There's no way he can know every lab around the world doing research on nerves.
                                mcferguson, I think your comment did an ill turn to dr.Wise.

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