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Did you recover some function more than 1 year after injury?

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  • Did you recover some function more than 1 year after injury?

    I am curious to see how many people recovered voluntary motor or sensory function more than one year after injury. Please feel free to post details about your recovery. Recovery means appearance of motor or sensory function that was not present at 1 year after injury. Sensory recovery includes a patch of touch or pressure sensation on the skin, induced pain, bladder and/or bowel sensation, and ability to sense joint movements. Motor recovery includes voluntary movements better than what you had at 12 months after injury, including sphincter control and moving muscles voluntarily (not involuntary spasms). If you are "incomplete", I consider significantly greater strength or better coordination to indicate recovery.

    [This message was edited by Wise Young on November 28, 2001 at 04:47 AM.]
    57
    Nope, I recovered all my function during the first year and have had no more motor or sensory recovery since
    35.09%
    20
    Yes, I recovered additional motor or sensory function in the second year after injury
    38.60%
    22
    Yes, I recovered additional function at 3-5 years after injury
    19.30%
    11
    Yes, I recovered additional function at 6-10 years after injury
    1.75%
    1
    Yes, I recovered additional function at over 10 years after injury
    5.26%
    3

  • #2
    My return tapered off at about 1 1/2 years, but I got another burst at about 2 years or longer. I attribute this return to picking up working out again. I had very little hamstring before, and I can lift my heels straight up if I lay on my stomach.


    If I get on a leg machine for hamstrings, I can do about 20 lbs. now. I have started working out again (I am 4 years post injury now), but I have not noticed any further return.

    Hensley-Martin Management
    "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked..."
    - Allen Ginsburg

    Comment


    • #3
      Recovery

      I am a T12/L1 flaccid and I have slowly revovered feelings in my right leg to my mid calf, and gained some motor from my inner thigh abs and hip hiker, but mostly my inner thigh within the first three yrs, then the other leg, my left, then and still is showing the same recovery but not as strong 9 yrs after. I get these sharp stabbing pains in the motor recovery.

      Comment


      • #4
        NO RECOVERY OPTION

        Shouldn't there be a "never recovered anything at any time" option?

        Comment


        • #5
          Christopher

          Good point.

          "Life is about how you
          respond to not only the
          challenges you're dealt but
          the challenges you seek...If
          you have no goals, no
          mountains to climb, your
          soul dies".~Liz Fordred
          "Life is about how you
          respond to not only the
          challenges you're dealt but
          the challenges you seek...If
          you have no goals, no
          mountains to climb, your
          soul dies".~Liz Fordred

          Comment


          • #6
            Relevance?

            Given that there will be a decreasing number of eligible respondents for each choice, seriously skewing any results, what are the goals of this poll?

            [This message was edited by Rick on November 27, 2001 at 09:30 AM.]
            Know Thyself

            Comment


            • #7
              Recovery vs strengthening

              I think some of the replies indicate strengthening rather than recovery. Also the effect of 4-AP may be considered by some as recovery rather than reenforcement of existing signals.

              But it does show what I was told by my rehab docs, "Almost all recovery takes place during the first 18 mos." However, most went on to say that they had heard stories about recovery years after injury.
              Could be the result of self-decompression of the cord.

              Joe B
              Joe B
              C6-7
              1988

              Comment


              • #8
                decreasing levels

                I was diagnosed complete at t12, 18 months ago. Since then I have gotten back all of my lower abdominals, IT band in the left thigh, some glutes, and even a little hamstring. I have some light touch sensation down to the knee, but the touch sensation hasn't changed since the injury.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Christopher Paddon, if a person does not recover anything after injury, they would fall into the first category. This poll may provide us with some surprising results. For many years, rehabilitation doctors tended to tell patients that they are unlikely to recover anything more than a year after injury. Based on personal experience, I think that we might be surprised by the number of people that recover some function even many years after injury.

                  Joe B, I agree that some of the recovery is due to "strengthening" as opposed to reconnection but I am not looking for the mechanism of recovery as much as just the simple fact of recovery. I don't think that we understand enough about the recovery mechanisms or have the tools to discern the mechanisms in people. Even in animals, it is not clear why they recover.

                  Rick, The purpose of the poll is to see how many people recover function more than a year after injury. We should expect to see a declining number of people showing recovery at more than 2 years after injury. I think that we are already seeing that over half of the people are recovering some function more than 1 year after injury and that some people are continuing to recover some function up to 10 or more years after injury.

                  This poll is flawed in that it does not segregate people that are complete and incomplete. Also, I made a mistake in the second option... i.e. recovery at 1-2 years after injury. I have just corrected this to indicate the second year after injury. In any case, I think that this poll is already telling us that many people are getting some function back beyond a year after injury.

                  Wise.

                  Wise.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    dr young how much do you think is real recovery versus other muscles becoming stronger giving the illusion of recovery?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Dr. Young:

                      I suffered an incomplete C6/7 on June 23rd, 1997. I had no voluntary motor control below my chest after spinal shock wore off. As I've previously mentioned (and you politely explained) I have always been able to move my toes slightly when my tone is especially high. About a year and a half ago (three years post injury) I felt I was regaining slight motor control in my torso (mainly my obliques), but this fizzled and went no further. About four months ago I began feeling slight sensory and motor changes again, which were connected. By this I mean that the sensations I'm feeling are the contractions of previously disused muscles. So there is no telling if the sensory connections were always there but sent no signals because the muscles in question weren't being contracted, or if the sensory connections are being somehow restored in tandem with the motor controls. Anyway, at four and a half years post injury I'm finally able to contract my stomach muscles in feeble "crunches." Also, I'm able to rock my pelvis from side to side, from front to back, and in lascivious circles (now if I could only acheive an erection I'd be in business:< ) These movements are completely new.

                      Anyway, since you raised this point, could you answer the following question? It's part of a letter I had written you previously, then decided not to send.

                      Can you tell me why the process I'm experiencing involves markedly stronger torso and pelvic contractions to either side, rather than when using both sides in tandem? In other words, when "crunching" my abdominals I'm able to do it better if I also twist from side to side, rather than trying to do them together in alignment (although this also is improving too...very slowly). The same is true of scrunching my back, i.e., if I favor one side or the other the movements are stronger. Also, the same symptoms have lately occurred with my pelvis. I'm able to rock it from side to side like a belly dancer, much better than I can rock it forward and back.

                      I would have thought that using both muscle groups (left and right) in tandem would have resulted in stronger movements. However, now I'm wondering if it's a matter of the exhaustive effort of once again concentrating mental motor signals from the brain to the body?

                      James Kelly
                      James Kelly

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        DA, how would you distinguish between recovery and strengthening? I too was worried about this when I phrased the poll, particularly in the case of people with so-called "incomplete" injuries who, due to use, are getting stronger with time. That is one of the reasons why I tried to insert the caveat "significantly greater strength or coordination" when applied to people with incomplete injuries. Perhaps I should also have included less fatigue as one of the hallmarks of recovery from in complete spinal cord injury.

                        One of the posters at the Society for Neuroscience, from Richard Hermann in Arizona doing central pattern generator stimulation at L2, was particularly interesting from the viewpoint of fatigue. He is working with a person with cervical spinal cord injury who can stand up and take some steps but apparently could not do so for long distance without substantial fatigue. However, with CPG stimulation, the person went from walking household walking at 15 meters to being able to ambulate 10,000 meters. Metabolic studies indicate that the person was using substantially less energy walking, suggesting that the CPG is activating a more efficient set of walking muscles than the brain can.

                        Wise.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Length of time injured

                          I voted in the 3-5 year category because I began recovering some motor function on the sides of my trunk in the third year. However, I'm only 4.5 years post-injury. I haven't given up hope of further recovery that will make more of a difference in the future.

                          The poll might consider the length of time since the injury. For example, if my injury had occurred 20 years ago, it means more if my last recovery was in the third year, which was 17 years ago, rather than in the third year, which was last year.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Jim, I tried to answer your question in the Care Forum

                            rtr, your question is an interesting one. To me, you are basically asking how many people have a stable neurological status for many years. That would be an interesting topic for a poll...

                            Wise.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My history.

                              I'm a C-5,6 Incomplete. My accident happened in 1982. The most significant recovery is listed as follows. I recovered part of my ankle about a year after injury, I recovered part of my thumb after five years,after about three months it was able to hold things again using my thumb. I recovered small part of my one quadricep after 14 years. I recovered very minor bowel control after 16 years. Some of my Return consists of a type, of assisted movement where I can control a spasm, as the spasm wears off the movement stops, until I trigger another spasm.
                              "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

                              -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

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