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    http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/sh...ES%3AHK&rank=3

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      The trial referred to above is a phase I trial aimed at establishing the safety of umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell transplants into the brains of patients with middle cerebral artery stroke. It will be carried out at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Hong Kong University. A total of 6 patients will be transplanted and compared against 6 matched non-transplanted control patients with similar strokes, ages, and times after stroke. In addition to helping our colleagues with the logistics of carrying out this stroke trial at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Hong Kong University, this trial will establish the safety of injecting cells into the brain. We are also interested in the safety of brain transplants for spinal cord injury for the following reasons:

      Brain transplants may be something that we may need to do to treat spinal cord injury, because it delivers growth factors close to the neurons that we want to grow their axons. Dr. John Lin and colleagues in Taiwan (submitted for publication) recently showed that injection of peripheral blood CD34+ mononuclear cells into the brain can remarkably stimulate regeneration of the corticospinal tract and restore function in people with chronic stroke. However, older patients have fewer CD34+ cells and they apparently did not recover as well. Of course umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells are the youngest and presumably more potent.

      Thus, it is of interest to determine whether CD34+ mononuclear cells from HLA-matched umbilical cord blood would have the same effect as autologous peripheral blood CD34+ mononuclear cells. Injection of cells into the brain may be a rational target for stimulating corticospinal tract regeneration in patients with tetraplegia, for example. The trial is sponsored by Stemcyte and we are not using any spinal cord injury trial funds raised in Hong Kong to do the trial.

      Wise.

      Comment


        Originally posted by mamadavid View Post
        Hello,

        Although your question was for Dr Young I'll take the liberty of replying to the best of my ability. I had the privilege of meeting Dr Zhu and observing her walking programme last March. I also visited the new private hospital where she has since transferred her operation. The hospital is called Tongren Hospital and is part of a group of private hospitals in China owned by a Hong Kong businessman. The facility is brand new and was partially up and running when I visited. It is huge and modern. I was given a guided tour by the assistant general manager and it seemed to be well equipped with the latest medical hardware. I was shown the VIP rooms and VIP suites where I was told the overseas patients would stay -- good beds, accessible bathrooms, flat screen TVs, nicely decorated -- no cause for complaint. However, as I pointed out to Dr Zhu, most if not all of the overseas patients who will be interested in attending her walking programme will be chronically injured people who will not need or want to stay in a hospital room. They will be there for the rehab and apart from that will be "normal" people living in a "normal" way. As far as I could see the VIP rooms and suites were for the hospital as a whole, not just for Dr Zhu's patients, so one can assume that they will be accommodating very sick people, people recovering from surgery, etc., and needing a very quiet, very medicalised environment. I told Dr Zhu that the people who would be coming from overseas for the walking programme would probably be happier with another type of accommodation -- say apartments where they could share equipment and carers, cook, listen to music, etc. She has since written to me (my son is planning to attend her programme at the end of the summer) that she is planning on offering foreign patients pleasant, family-like living arrangements. I'm not sure what she has planned but I will be seeing her on June 12 and will get all the details from her.
        I cannot tell you how impressed I was with Dr Zhu and her team. Never have I seen a more caring, positive, altruistic person than Dr Zhu (apart from Wise Young of course!). Seeing her patients at various stages of walking was such an inspiration and I am convinced that her programme is the best next step for my son.
        I know so many of you will want to know more details -- cost and duration of the programme, what kind of nursing care and assistance can be provided, etc. I can't answer these questions now but will be finding out in the next few weeks. I'll share all the answers as soon as I have them.
        http://www.kmtrh.org/ZJTRS.Aspx?ID=418#

        Comment


          I am also wondering about progress of report that mamadavid has promised in June this year about private Tongren Hospital in Kunming and Dr. Zhu Hui start to work there.
          Dr. Wise was also explaining about Dr. Zhu new start after retirement in this private clinic.
          Is anyone get any news?
          How realistic will be to see faster implementation of UCBMC + lithium (or similar) procedure in private clinic as Tongren or any other ?
          www.MiracleofWalk.com

          Miracles are not contrary to nature, but only contrary
          to what we know about nature
          Saint Augustine

          Comment


            what is strange not the name of dr zhu hui on the website of the hospital and nothing on the internet and read in on a site that Chinese hui zhu retired definitive

            Comment


              Dr. Zhu Hui was required to retire from the Army due to her age.
              She is now at a private hospital where she will continue her career. This private hospital will be accepting visiting patients. This is all I know.

              Comment


                the comment above professor thank you

                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22234988

                Comment


                  At the spinal cord workshop of today Wise has given un update on the trials at chinaSCINet.
                  Videos are available here:

                  http://www.ustream.tv/channel/spinal-cord-workshop

                  It is interesting that Wise said that the patients didn't improve motor and sensory score, but some of them walk... ???

                  Paolo
                  In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by paolocipolla View Post
                    At the spinal cord workshop of today Wise has given un update on the trials at chinaSCINet.
                    Videos are available here:

                    http://www.ustream.tv/channel/spinal-cord-workshop

                    It is interesting that Wise said that the patients didn't improve motor and sensory score, but some of them walk... ???

                    Paolo

                    Paolo, I thought that too, was the jist of it that the rehab regimen improved walking function and ucbmc doesn't really do anything? As to sensory and bbb???
                    "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

                    "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


                    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
                    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

                    Comment


                      They recovered some walking without increase in motor function or sensory?

                      Also, regrowing spinal cord tissue might not help functional recovery?

                      Maybe I misunderstood what he said.

                      Comment


                        I hope this is wrong.
                        Why would they spend a lot of time, money and resources on a phase three trail if the 6month data of the phase two trail shows no recovery?
                        Originally posted by paolocipolla
                        Moe,

                        I... don't care about what I think ... you should just ignore my posts.

                        I don't understand ... words.

                        Paolo

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Solan View Post
                          I hope this is wrong.
                          Why would they spend a lot of time, money and resources on a phase three trail if the 6month data of the phase two trail shows no recovery?
                          Any chance Dr. Young could comment on the rationale here? It seems to me, from the comments here and indeed the question at that talk, that there is reason to suspect that some combination of the rehab alone and false classification of complete injuries could be responsible for the walking... Ok maybe not even suspicion, more pure speculation considering none of us have seen the data, but is there sufficient evidence to the contrary i.e. the cell transplant is helping?
                          An aside: we've probably all met walking quads/incomplete paras who have little to no sensation below a certain level, for example below the knees. What on earth would it feel like to walk without having a change in sensation below an upper thoracic/lower cervical injury?!?

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by paolocipolla View Post
                            At the spinal cord workshop of today Wise has given un update on the trials at chinaSCINet.
                            Videos are available here:

                            http://www.ustream.tv/channel/spinal-cord-workshop

                            It is interesting that Wise said that the patients didn't improve motor and sensory score, but some of them walk... ???

                            Paolo
                            This is another disappointment
                            Dr. Young, why r u going ahead with the trial in Norway, China, US and India ??

                            Comment


                              This is a big disappointment , but was on the cards , as Wise had said earlier to lower down our expectations. I do not see any real cure of sorts coming in the near future. With this kind of a result I don't think many countries are going to do what Wise is hoping that they will do.

                              Comment


                                lakboy and others,

                                As I pointed out in my talk, it is still early and we don't have all our 6 month data yet. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor and sensory scores represent voluntary strength of 5 muscle groups in the legs. These scores do not appear to have changed at 6 weeks but some of the patients have shown improvements in their ability to stand and take steps. This does not mean that the patients will not recover voluntary scores in the coming months and years. It is still very early.

                                I asked the question how people can recover locomotor capability when they are not showing changes in their motor and sensory scores. Our data suggest that the ASIA motor and sensory scores do not necessarily reflect indirect activation of the central pattern generator. ASIA motor and sensory scores are very important for detecting losses of long spinal tracts. However, they may not reflect recovery of function, which may be through indirect activation.

                                If you ask people who are "walking quads" (like Patrick Rummersfeld, who runs marathons and does triathlons) to tap their feet or wiggle their toes, you will find that they are often not able to do so. Patrick has little or no feeling below his knees. Yet, he is able to walk well and run marathons. That is because he is able to activate the central pattern generator even though he may not be able to activate the muscles directly.

                                This discrepancy between walking and motor scores may also be because spinal tract growth is (and should be) taking a long time. We see no growth of white matter tracts across the injury site at 6 weeks or even 6 months in some subjects. We are seeing white matter growth at 6 months in 3 of the 5 patients that we have transplanted and obtained good MRI-DTI scans from.

                                We don't know whether the axons that appear to be crossing the injury site have connected with neurons below. We also need to confirm these imaging results with careful neurophysiological assessments of the patients. Also, although we saw this in one patient only, white matter not only appears to be able to grow but also to retract, which is not so surprising.

                                These are very important phenomena to know and understand as we design our phase III studies. I also wanted my colleagues who are designing and running clinical trials to be aware of these phenomena.

                                Wise.

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