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First evidence that chitosan could repair spinal damage

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    #16
    Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
    If the material is to be injected into the spinal cord, it will require animal safety data (if the data is not already available). Chitosan has been around for a long long time. I of course knew about chitin because this is the material that shrimp shells are made from but I wasn't aware of the all the biomedical uses of this material. By the way, what one eats is very different from what one injects into the body and particularly into the spinal cord.

    Wise.
    I understand. I also understand that bypassing the FDA isn't a good thing although I would love to see these types of treatments come out faster. This treatment could possibly be a solution for my SCI as I have a bruised spinal cord. This sounds great though. It seems like they already have the Animal Safety data.
    Last edited by XYNaPSE; 18 Apr 2010, 2:40 PM.

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      #17
      I had a post in this forum a few months ago on chitosan. I could only find an abstract about how in China they are using chitosan and I believe collagen for chronic injuries. I'll have to look for it.

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        #18
        Try Pubmed or sciencedirect.com.

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          #19
          Heres the stuff I have, not bad $6.00 for 120 capsules even though its slightly expired. http://www.avilaproducts.com/theprod...9227&owner=622

          I remember when I took it that it did not seem to do much of anything though.
          "Life is about how you
          respond to not only the
          challenges you're dealt but
          the challenges you seek...If
          you have no goals, no
          mountains to climb, your
          soul dies".~Liz Fordred

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            #20
            Originally posted by Curt Leatherbee View Post
            Heres the stuff I have, not bad $6.00 for 120 capsules even though its slightly expired. http://www.avilaproducts.com/theprod...9227&owner=622

            I remember when I took it that it did not seem to do much of anything though.
            Found this where it talks about being a fat attractor.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chitosa...ealth_benefits
            Chitosan is frequently sold in tablet form at health stores as a "fat attractor": It is supposed to have the capability of attracting fat from the digestive system and expelling it from the body so that users can, it is claimed, lose weight without eating less. However, some scientific research suggests that these claims are likely without substance. The FDA has issued warning letters to several companies who make claims that are not supported by reliable scientific evidence to the benefits of chitosan as a fat blocker.[35] At best, unmodified chitosan would remove roughly 10 calories per day from a person's diet.[36] Modified chitosan is claimed to absorb anywhere up to three to six times its weight in fat and oils. Detractors claim[who?] that using chitosan may have the deleterious effect of rendering ineffective certain minerals found in foodstuffs and required by the body in order to remain healthy.

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              #21
              This isn't exactly true:

              Richard Borgens and his colleagues from the Center for Paralysis Research at the Purdue School of Veterinary Medicine have a strong record of inventing therapies for treating nerve damage. From Ampyra, which improves walking in multiple sclerosis patients to a spinal cord simulator for spinal injury victims, Borgens has had a hand in developing therapies that directly impact patients and their quality of life.
              Borgens didn't develop Ampyra.

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                #22
                Originally posted by antiquity View Post
                This isn't exactly true:



                Borgens didn't develop Ampyra.
                hmmm. Wher'd you get that information?
                https://engineering.purdue.edu/BME/A...forUniqueMulti
                Borgens, Shi and Collaborators Receive FDA Approval for Unique Multiple Sclerosis Drug


                Professors Richard Borgens, Riyi Shi and Andrew Blight (former Purdue professor) received notification that their drug, Ampyra, has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for improving motor function in patients with multiple sclerosis.

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                  #23
                  this sounds like the same stuff only in a form that allegedly crosses the blood/brain barrier
                  http://www.herbspro.com/shop/product...tm_medium=Feed
                  NanoTek Chitosan
                  NanoTek Chitosan contains nano-particle chitosan oligosaccharide that can be better absorbed into the bloodstream, with significantly enhanced detoxification potential.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by XYNaPSE View Post
                    hmmm. Wher'd you get that information?
                    https://engineering.purdue.edu/BME/A...forUniqueMulti
                    The excerpt I quoted came from the original post. Several articles have been posted here regarding Ampyra which was developed by Accorda.

                    I know that Borgens is currently working on 4-AP-3-MeOH which is different from 4-aminopyridine, the drug patented and tested through Accorda, received FDA approval earlier this year and released commercially as Ampyra. Wise offers a summary here: /forum/showpost.php?p=1161450&postcount=1

                    I don't believe Borgens was involved in testing 4-aminopyridine on human subjects but since he was one of the first researchers to see its potential, I suppose he is now being credited for the final product and Accorda's accomplishment.
                    Last edited by antiquity; 19 Apr 2010, 3:01 PM.

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                      #25
                      Crab shells help spinal injury?


                      Posted by Lauren Urban
                      [Entry posted at 19th April 2010 03:48 PM GMT]
                      Comment on this news story

                      Material from crushed up crab and shrimp shells can restore electrical function to damaged guinea pig spinal cords, suggesting it may one day serve as a treatment for spinal cord injuries, according to a study published April 16th in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

                      This paper is an "intriguing first step," said Scott Whittemore, professor of neurological surgery at the University of Louisville, who was not involved in this research. But there are many steps that need to be taken first, he cautioned. "There needs to be more research and data presented before this is applied in a clinical setting," he added.



                      Trauma to the spinal cord often results in the deterioration of cell membranes, which then results in cell and tissue death, often leading to paralysis. One way to help eliminate loss of body functions is to seal the deteriorating cell membranes, researchers suggest. Chitin -- the main component of crustacean exoskeletons and fungi cell walls, previously used to build scaffolding for tissue growth -- has recently been suggested to stimulate spinal cord regeneration in rats.

                      To see if chitosan, a form of chitin, could help seal cell membranes after spinal cord injury, neuroscientist Youngnam Cho of the Center for Paralysis Research at Purdue University and her colleagues examined the spinal cords of guinea pigs. After dissection, the researchers soaked a sample of the injured spinal cord fragments in chitosan, and then looked for leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) -- an intracellular enzyme that is found in cerebrospinal fluid -- to see if the cell membrane was intact. Surprisingly, the researchers detected only low levels of LDH release from the chitosan-treated cells -- even lower than those treated with polyethylene glycol (PEG), a "well-known cell membrane sealant," Cho said -- suggesting that the cells had been fused and sealed.



                      Read more: http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/57340/

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Manouli,

                        Thanks for posting this. This is a much more responsible report of the findings in the paper.

                        Wise.

                        Originally posted by manouli View Post
                        Crab shells help spinal injury?


                        Posted by Lauren Urban
                        [Entry posted at 19th April 2010 03:48 PM GMT]
                        Comment on this news story

                        Material from crushed up crab and shrimp shells can restore electrical function to damaged guinea pig spinal cords, suggesting it may one day serve as a treatment for spinal cord injuries, according to a study published April 16th in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

                        This paper is an "intriguing first step," said Scott Whittemore, professor of neurological surgery at the University of Louisville, who was not involved in this research. But there are many steps that need to be taken first, he cautioned. "There needs to be more research and data presented before this is applied in a clinical setting," he added.



                        Trauma to the spinal cord often results in the deterioration of cell membranes, which then results in cell and tissue death, often leading to paralysis. One way to help eliminate loss of body functions is to seal the deteriorating cell membranes, researchers suggest. Chitin -- the main component of crustacean exoskeletons and fungi cell walls, previously used to build scaffolding for tissue growth -- has recently been suggested to stimulate spinal cord regeneration in rats.

                        To see if chitosan, a form of chitin, could help seal cell membranes after spinal cord injury, neuroscientist Youngnam Cho of the Center for Paralysis Research at Purdue University and her colleagues examined the spinal cords of guinea pigs. After dissection, the researchers soaked a sample of the injured spinal cord fragments in chitosan, and then looked for leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) -- an intracellular enzyme that is found in cerebrospinal fluid -- to see if the cell membrane was intact. Surprisingly, the researchers detected only low levels of LDH release from the chitosan-treated cells -- even lower than those treated with polyethylene glycol (PEG), a "well-known cell membrane sealant," Cho said -- suggesting that the cells had been fused and sealed.



                        Read more: http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/57340/

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                          #27
                          assume there is NO current info on chitosan?? if i am incorrect someone plrease advise. thanks poobear

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                            #28
                            since no response since last post i assume this is a LOST CAUSE POOBEAR

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by poobear View Post
                              since no response since last post i assume this is a LOST CAUSE POOBEAR
                              poobear,

                              I don't know what you mean. Chitosan is an interesting material but nobody is studying it, not because it is not interesting or a lost cause. I suspect that nobody has the money to study it. It is nearly impossible to get grants to study anything in spinal cord injury. Les than 10% of grants are being funded by NIH and all the states are cutting back on spinal cord injury funding. Most of the work that is being done comes are either funded by companies or in overseas countries.

                              Wise.

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                                #30
                                wise i only referred to LOST CAUSE in regard to the fact that no new posts were forthcomming re chitosan. i agree with you that the probable reason is lack of funds thus no news. it is a shame for it might well have been a savior. poobear

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