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Next decade offers promise for treatment of spinal cord injuries

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    Next decade offers promise for treatment of spinal cord injuries

    Public release date: 1-Apr-2010
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    Contact: Lauren Pearson
    pearson@aaos.org
    847-384-4031
    American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

    Next decade offers promise for treatment of spinal cord injuries


    New study says a multidisciplinary approach is most likely to achieve results
    Although new developments in the management of spinal cord injuries (SCI) are on the horizon, any eventual cure for the condition is more likely to involve a multidisciplinary approach, drawing from expertise in several fields, according to a review article published in the April 2010 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS).


    Each year, approximately 12,000 men and women sustain and survive spinal cord injuries, and about 259,000 Americans currently live with a long-lasting SCI.
    Although traditionally associated primarily with young adults, today the average age of SCI patients has risen to 40.2 years.
    Automobile crashes are the most common cause of SCI, and males are most often affected, comprising almost 81 percent of all SCI patients.

    According to Ranjan Gupta, MD, chair of the department of orthopaedic surgery and professor of orthopaedic surgery, anatomy and neurobiology, and biomedical engineering at the University of California, Irvine, newer therapeutic approaches including stem cell therapy and novel drug formulations, hold special promise for management of SCI patients.


    read...

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-ndo040110.php
    56
    Yes
    92.86%
    52
    No
    7.14%
    4

    #2
    Next "decade"? I was hoping more like next couple of years.
    "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

    "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by lunasicc42 View Post
      Next "decade"? I was hoping more like next couple of years.
      Don't worry what they are saying, next couple of years is most likely. They always get stuck saying 5 or 10 years.

      Comment


        #4
        theyve been sayin "next couple of years, since like the 80s"... Stop me, but I am starting to take the way of da
        "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

        "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


        2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
        Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

        Comment


          #5
          As far as "predictions" goes, nothing has changed. Do a search on this forum, and you'll see, for instance, back in 2002, forum members were confident they would be on their feet in a few years, based on the progress of axon regeneration being achieved in the lab back then. Most of these members are no longer active on this forum. They've moved on.

          So, it's been: 5 more years; not if but when; it's imminent; within the next 10 years; etc. These predictions are worthless. Based on my experience, anytime some says 2-5-10 years, not if but when, they really have no idea. I get so tired of reading this sh_t.

          So, in the context of reality rearing it's ugly head, no one really knows.

          Comment


            #6
            in 2002, they knew how to remylinate axons, grow a few hundred axons across the injury site, they knew about l1, and testing neurons created with stem cells. by 2004, they were growings thousands and thousands of axons across the injury site.

            Comment


              #7
              As far as predictions a lot has changed we have more info and politics have changed trials are in view and results of all this right there, not so far any more.
              THINK POSITIVE NOW.

              Comment


                #8
                I´m not realy sure about when we can hava a normal life again, it´s true that they´ve been saying 5 or 8 years for a long time even Wise as we can read at the forum "10 questions about SCI" said that the new therapies would be aplicated in 4 or 8 years and it was 2002... Now we have more information, but I really think we will have to wait once more till that day... Hope and strength...

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Schmeky View Post
                  So, it's been: 5 more years; not if but when; it's imminent; within the next 10 years; etc. These predictions are worthless. Based on my experience, anytime some says 2-5-10 years, not if but when, they really have no idea. I get so tired of reading this sh_t.
                  Pretty much.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Schmeky View Post
                    As far as "predictions" goes, nothing has changed. Do a search on this forum, and you'll see, for instance, back in 2002, forum members were confident they would be on their feet in a few years, based on the progress of axon regeneration being achieved in the lab back then. Most of these members are no longer active on this forum. They've moved on.
                    If they didn't "move on" (I think "moved on" btw is just another words for lazy butt's) the cure could have been on a very good positive track by now.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by DA View Post
                      in 2002, they knew how to remylinate axons, grow a few hundred axons across the injury site, they knew about l1, and testing neurons created with stem cells. by 2004, they were growings thousands and thousands of axons across the injury site.
                      So why didn't you create clinical trials in 2002?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        One of the major orthopedic surgery organizations in the United States is saying that they have hope for spinal cord injury and what is the response on CareCure? Over 50% of the posts are criticizing each other for saying that they hope. Have you listened to yourselves recently? Please, what matters is that it is good for the field when clinicians have hope and believe that there will be therapies. Please stop complaining and do something positive. Thank you.

                        Wise.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                          One of the major orthopedic surgery organizations in the United States is saying that they have hope for spinal cord injury and what is the response on CareCure? Over 50% of the posts are criticizing each other for saying that they hope. Have you listened to yourselves recently? Please, what matters is that it is good for the field when clinicians have hope and believe that there will be therapies. Please stop complaining and do something positive. Thank you.

                          Wise.
                          You are right, and I hope those therapies to be ready as soon as possible... To many people are suffering the SCI and we all are in the same boat..

                          Thanks Wise.
                          Hope and strength..

                          Comment


                            #14
                            With all due respect Wise, hope has existed for decades with few tangible results. Hope isn't going anywhere, but we as consumers must be realistic.

                            Take the recent hype surrounding Apple's iPad, for example. Rumors of its development/existence floated around the web for a while (just as "rumors" of a "cure" do). It was finally announced. Consumer interest swelled. Pre-order numbers skyrocketed, all without but a select few actually touching the device. Apple can create products that people desire even without seeing in-person. Tomorrow will be another crazy day where the enthusiasts wait in line all night just to get their paws on a device that hasn't even been proven to be beneficial to one's life yet.

                            If this "hope" is worth getting the consumers hyped up over and thus prompting them to "do something positive," perhaps the research industry needs to look at examples of effective marketing.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Guessing as to when the cure will arrive can be a disheartening exercise but that does not mean that I am not encouraged by reports like this. I have given in having confidence in the estimates of how long it will take but the way I read this report is that rapid progress is being made and researchers who know a lot more than the majority of us are saying that we are getting a lot closer. I find that encouraging. As far as a time is concerned, I say with absolute certainty that we are significantly closer now than we were when I first heard an estimate. I regard that as good news.

                              Comment

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