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Wise, help please.

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    Wise, help please.

    Dr Kessler at Northwestern is working , as you know, on stem cell therapy for spinal injuries. He is committed because of his daughter's injury. This is good except he is saying we're years away from anything promising. My question is, do you agree or are we closer than we think?

    #2
    Something to think about. Dr. Kessler been working on a treatment for 6 years. Dr. Young as been working on for over 30 years. My vote goes to Dr. Young.

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      #3
      Sounds good to me.

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        #4
        i hope dr. Young evaluates his position
        "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

        "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


        2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
        Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

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          #5
          contrary or not
          "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

          "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


          2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
          Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

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            #6
            If Kessler is working in the field, he's probably got a good idea of where he's at.
            Tom

            "Blessed are the pessimists, for they hath made backups." Exasperated 20:12

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              #7
              Last time I had spoken to kessler, about four months ago, he believed his current research was close to going to a clinical trial, but his research was not a "cure". It was an improvement.
              Has anyone truly spoken to him lately as to validate any of these claims and would be able to quote him?

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                #8
                Hey, an improvement is a step in the right direction. From where and from whom, it doesn't matter, as long as it gets done.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by keeping on View Post
                  Dr Kessler at Northwestern is working , as you know, on stem cell therapy for spinal injuries. He is committed because of his daughter's injury. This is good except he is saying we're years away from anything promising. My question is, do you agree or are we closer than we think?
                  Keeping on,

                  "Years away" seems about right. I agree with Dr. Kessler. We are years but, in my opinion, not decades away from therapies that restore function. It may not work for everybody and it may not restore full function but there will be therapies that restore substantial function to many people.

                  What is the basis of my belief? As everybody knows and many studies have now shown, a person with incomplete spinal cord injury (ASIA C) has a >90% chance of recovering unassisted locomotion. I think that there are therapies that can convert animals from the equivalent of ASIA A to C and that some of these therapies will work in people.

                  Let me first describe why we chose umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and lithium as the first treatment to test in the ChinaSCINet trials.
                  1. Bridging the injury site. The injury site is not particularly hospitable to growing axons. There may be cysts, loss of cellular adhesion molecules, and other surfaces for axons to grow on. The injury site may be surrounded by chondroitin-6-sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) that inhibit axonal growth. This problem can be resolved by injecting cells into the spinal cord at the edge of the injury site. Transplanted umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells grow into the injury site and form a bridge across the injury site.
                  2. Sustained growth factor support. Long distance axonal regeneration require sustained growth factor support. We discovered that lithium strongly stimulate umbilical cord mononuclear cells to produce neurotrophins, particularly NGF and NT3, the growth factors known to encourage axonal regeneration. Lithium is safe to give to people with chronic spinal cord injury and also stimulates neural stem cells.
                  3. Blocking growth inhibitors. CSPG and a myelin-protein called Nogo are known to block axonal regeneration. Treatments that block axonal responses to Nogo and CSPG (i.e. cethrin), that block Nogo (i.e. Novartis' nogo antibodies), or break down CSPG (chondroitinase) have been reported to stimulate regeneration and restore function in animals. Likewise, several groups have reported that combination neurotrophin treatment and increasing cAMP level will allow axons to ignore growth inhibitors.


                  So, in our ChinaSCINet trials, we have first tested lithium and find that it can be safely given to people with chronic spinal cord injury. We are now starting trials to establish the safety of transplanting HLA-matched umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells into the spinal cord with and without lithium. I hope that that the combination will restore function and we should know within a year or two. We are then planning to compare growth inhibitor blockers infused into the spinal cord of these patients.

                  Wise.

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                    #10
                    Wise, thank you as usual; we're waiting to be tested ourselves and are eagerl and willing participants to find a cure. Remeber sitting ina chair and waiting for soemthing big to happen can be torturous. Please understand our emotions and expectamcy for some breakthru. I know you understand this; but those of us that experience everyday thoughly understand this.

                    Thanks,
                    T.J.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by keeping on View Post
                      Wise, thank you as usual; we're waiting to be tested ourselves and are eagerl and willing participants to find a cure. Remeber sitting ina chair and waiting for soemthing big to happen can be torturous. Please understand our emotions and expectamcy for some breakthru. I know you understand this; but those of us that experience everyday thoughly understand this.

                      Thanks,
                      T.J.
                      T.J.,

                      It would be so good if we had many clinical trials and not just one or two. The more the better.

                      Wise.

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                        #12
                        I have not spoken to Kessler; just read reviews. What improvements is he looking at? When will his clinical trials begin? Thanks in advance.

                        T.J.

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                          #13
                          Question to Dr. Young-

                          What dollar amount would be necessary to push spinal cord research and trials to the point at which a truly effective therapy (for complete chronic injuries) can be developed?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Young
                            "Years away" seems about right. I agree with Dr. Kessler. We are years but, in my opinion, not decades away from therapies that restore function.
                            This is not personal, and know you're working diligently, but this sounds very familiar to me.

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                              #15
                              well if it is not decades away then nine years is too long also !!

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